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Full text of "The University of North Carolina School of Medicine and Alumni Association bulletin [serial]"

The University of North Carolina 



School of Medicine and 

Medical Alumni Association Bulletin 



Fall-Winter 1969-70 



Volume XVII 



IMo. 1 



EDITORIAL COMMITTEE 






Faculty: 






George D. Penick, M.D., Chairman 






Carl W. Gottschalk, M.D. 






William E. Lassiter, M.D. 






Benson R. Wilcox, M.D. 






Alumni: 

Charles L Herring, M.D. 


IN THIS ISSUE 




Isaac V. Manly, M.D. 
William W. McLendon, M.D. 


Message from the Dean 


3 


Shahane R. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 


The Long-Awaited Division of 
Radiation Therapy 


4 


NCMH House Staff: 


Daniel Allan MacPherson, Ph.D. 


6 


Gordon B. LeGrand, M.D. 


Community Psychiatry: What Is It? 


8 


Student: 


UNC's "Medic-Air" Service 


10 


Don A. Gabriel 


The Birth Defects Treatment Center 


12 


Medical Foundation of N. C, Inc.: 


The Country Doctor Museum 


13 


Emory S. Hunt 


Presenting the House Staff 


14 


Charles L. Powell 


Summer 


15-19 




Fall/Winter 


20-23 


EDITOR 

Maria A. Leon 


News from the Hill 
Class of 1973 


24 
36 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


Hospital Dedication 


44 


William Brinkhous, Charles L.Wright, 


Alumni News 


52 


NCMH Dept. Medical Illustration 


Alumni Necrology 


64 



THE LONG-AWAITED DIVISION OF 
RADIATION THERAPY 




By GERALD E. HANKS, M.D., Director 
Associate Professor of Radiology 



On April 1, 1969, a UNC professor became the first pa- 
tient to receive supervoitage radiation therapy at the 
University of North Carolina. Five years earlier, in re- 
sponse to the need demonstrated by the medical 
school faculty, the university administration, and un- 
told friends of the university, the legislative appro- 
priated funds to build and equip the long-awaited Di- 
vision of Radiation Therapy in the medical center at 
Chapel Hill. 

The goals of this new division are to provide the best 
radiotherapeutic care available, to teach oncology to 
medical students and house officers, to accumulate 
data that will help us discover the best methods of 
treatment, and to develop a section of radiobiology 
cancer research that will keep us alert to the applica- 
tion of new and exciting advances in the treatment of 
this dread disease. 

In the past, departments of radiation therapy have 
been small, crowded rooms in the basement of a medi- 
cal center, where patients were sent for palliative 
treatment of far-advanced malignancies. Within the 
past ten years, as a result of the technological ad- 
vances that have created such new terms as super- 
voltage, megavoltage, betatron, linear accelerator, 
simulator, and cobalt unit, a revolution in radiation 
therapy has taken place. The field has become so 
complex that the medical graduate who plans to spe- 
cialize in radiation therapy will need three or four 
years of training in that specialty alone. When he 
passes his board examinations (which are separate 
from those in diagnostic radiology), he may elect to 
join the American Society of Therapeutic Radiologists, 
an organization whose members practice radiation 
therapy full time. 

Radiation therapy is now indicated as part of the 
initial management of more than half of all cancers. 



Some of the conditions in which radiation therapy may 
be curative are early cancer of the larynx, Hodgkin's 
disease and the other lymphomas, and cancer of the 
cervix. Recent clinical investigation has indicated that 
preoperative radiation therapy may be valuable in 
cancers of the lung, esophagus, and rectum, and in 
selected cancers of the head and neck. 

Excellence in modern radiation therapy depends on 
the interaction of a number of well-trained people 
equipped with sophisticated and modern facilities. 
With thoughtful, cooperative effort between radiation 
therapists and specialists in surgery, medicine, gyne- 
cology, pediatrics, and other fields, 40 to 45% of all 
new cancer patients treated with radiation can be 
permanently and totally cured of their disease. 

The state of North Carolina is dependent upon the 
medical center at Chapel Hill to produce the majority 
of its practicing physicians. In the past, students and 
house officers at the university medical center have 
not had the opportunity to observe the modern use of 
radiation therapy in the management of cancer. By 
participating actively in the instruction of medical 
students and house staff, the new Division of Radia- 
tion Therapy will provide the future physicians of the 
state with a more comprehensive knowledge of the 
management of patients with cancer. 

The Division of Radiation Therapy contains about 
8,000 square feet of space, functionally divided into 
four areas as follows: 

1. The first area consists of reception and examining 
rooms. Since the radiation therapist is frequently the 
only physician in a medical center who restricts his 
practice to cancer, he is in a position to make positive 
contribution to the initial evaluation of the patient as 
well as to assist the patient's private physician in a 
follow-up program. 

2. The next area encompasses facilities for treatment- 
planning and tumor localization. A simulator, or du- 
plicate of the Cobalt-60 unit (but with a diagnostic 
x-ray head in place of the high-intensity radiation 
source), provides the precise geometric reproducibility 
needed to localize accurately the position of the tumor 
in relation to surface landmarks. The entire treatment 




can be planned and checked in a geometrically identi- 
cal position before tine patient enters the therapy 
room. This simulator provides the ultimate in flexible, 
efficient, and accurate means of localizing a cancer 
and planning its treatment. 




3. The third area contains equipment for radiation 
therapy. We have obtained the finest and most flexible 
equipment in use in North Carolina to give us treat- 
ment capabilities equal to any in the United States. 

A 25-million-eiectron-volt Allis-Chalmers betatron w\\ 
provide unique megavoltage capability by permitting a 
choice between high-energy electrons and high-energy 
x-rays. Further control of the depth of penetration is 
made possible by the ability to dial any energy be- 
tween 12 and 25 million volts. This unit will be espe- 
cially useful in treating cancers of the breast, cervix, 
bladder, and prostate, and some cancers of the head 
and neck. 

An 8, 750-curie Cobalt-60 unit with full rotational capa- 
bility has been installed. This unit's high rate of out- 
put and large field size are needed for the radical ra- 
diation therapy of lymphomas and ovarian cancer. The 
rotational capability will be helpful in treating pitui- 
tary tumors and cancers of the esophagus, bladder, 
and prostate. This cobalt unit, which is geometrically 
identical to our simulator unit, will readily accommo- 
date complicated field arrangements and is suitable 
for treating most cancers of the head and neck. 

The remaining two units are a conventional (250-Kilo- 
volt) therapy machine and a superficial therapy ma- 
chine. These will be used for palliative treatment in 
some patients and for curative treatment in patients 
with cancer of the skin. 



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For reasons of safety, the gynecologic radium supply 
of the department has been replaced by cesium, and 
cancer of the cervix is now being treated with the most 
modern applicators. The empty Fletcher-Suit after- 
loading devices are placed in position under anes- 
thesia. After the correct positioning of the applicator 
is confirmed by x-ray films, the cesium is easily in- 
serted into the applicator in the patient's room with a 
minimum of exposure to personnel. In addition to the 
decreased hazard to personnel, these afterloading de- 
vices have the advantage of permitting more accurate 
placement. 

4. The fourth area in the new division includes sup- 
porting facilities such as offices, a record room, a 
typists' pool, a physics and electronics laboratory, a 
machine shop and a conference room. 

The Division of Radiation Therapy now offers training 
in radiation therapy for residents desiring to specialize 
in radiation therapy alone or in combined radiology 
(diagnostic and therapeutic). Several elective pro- 
grams are available for medical students, and during 
the past summer two rising juniors had clinical fel- 
lowships in radiation therapy. 

Additional educational activities include the training 
of radiation health physicists in cooperation with the 
School of Public Health and the establishment of the 
first program in the state for training technologists in 
radiation therapy. The first two students in this pro- 
gram are now being trained under the direction of our 
chief technician. Miss Helen Swincer. 




Because radiobiology is the foundation of radiation 
therapy, excellence in clinical radiation therapy can 
be maintained only where the division of radiation 
therapy is combined with a strong radiation research 
unit. As a temporary measure, a small-animal radio- 
biology research facility has been constructed in 
trailers, while private funds are being sought that will 
permit the long-term development of additional space 
already committed to a section of radiobiology con- 
ducting cancer research adjacent to the clinical treat- 
ment facility. The donor who provides such funds 
will have in these cancer-research laboratories a con- 
tinuing public testimony to his interest in eliminating 
one of mankind's most feared diseases. 



DANIEL ALLAN MacPHERSON, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Bacteriology 



By WILLIAM R. STRAUGHN, JR., Ph.D. 
Professor of Bacteriology 



In 1969, for the first time in nearly half a century, the 
School of Medicine graduated a class which did not 
have the opportunity of learning bacteriology under 
the tutelage of Dr. Daniel Allan MacPherson. Dr. Mac- 
Pherson joined the medical school faculty in 1923 and 
taught every year until his retirement in 1966. 

Many practicing physicians throughout the state of 
North Carolina, and indeed across the country, can 
recall experiences associated with Dr. MacPherson's 
teaching of bacteriology. Some of these are pleasant 
and perhaps humorous memories, now; others are re- 
lated to long, tedious hours in laboratories and the 
exacting requirements for learning difficult subject 
matter. 

In the early days when the medical school was housed 
in Caldwell Hall, the students, in addition to studying 
the characteristics of microorganisms, prepared and 
sterilized ail of their own culture media and washed 
and sterilized the glassware. No matter how late stu- 
dents worked to accomplish these tasks. Dr. Mac- 
Pherson was usually available for assistance or con- 
sultation. 

Until the early 1940's, Dr. MacPherson was the only 
faculty member in the Department of Bacteriology and 
Immunology and gave all the lectures in bacteriology, 
immunology, hygiene, and preventive medicine, as well 
as a course in public health laboratory methods. As 
other faculty members were added to the department, 
responsibilities for courses were shared. 

Few of Dr. MacPherson's students can fail to recall 
the thoroughness and preciseness of his lectures. He 
spent many hours preparing them, keeping up with the 
current literature and taking care that no important 
details were omitted. Writer's cramp was a common 
complaint of students who, after an hour of note-tak- 
ing, had several pages of well-organized subject matter 
to be studied at a later time. He made all of his notes 
for lectures in a small black notebook which fitted into 
his coat pocket. At the start of each lecture this note- 
book was placed on the always-present lectern in front 
of him. From this moment on, students' eyes were 
fixed on their own notebooks, ears opened in an at- 
tempt to capture all that was said. His diction and 
enunciation were characteristic. No one can forget 
hearing for the first time the names of exotic diseases 
such as tsutsugamushi fever. It was not uncommon 
for a student to raise his eyes from his notes when he 
had finally caught up with the last spoken phrase, only 
to find that the lecture was over and Dr. MacPherson 
had quietly closed his notebook, placed it in his 
pocket, and departed from the lecture room. 



There were times when he felt that students were not 
keeping up with textbook reading but were depending 
wholly on his lectures for all the necessary informa- 
tion. At such times he might announce that he was 
going to stop lecturing and spend the class time on 
oral quizzes. Such sessions did not exactly evoke 
feelings of complacency among the students. They 
probably spent as much time worrying about whether 
they would be called on to answer as they did in 
studying. Usually, after several days of this a delega- 
tion would visit Dr. MacPherson to request that he 
resume his lectures, because the class found that 
system a more efficient way of learning. 

On those rare occasions when he was asked a question 
for which he did not have a ready answer, he made it 
his business to find the answer and to be certain that 
he would not be without that information if the ques- 
tion arose again. 

Written examinations were not noted for their brevity. 
Dr. MacPherson expected the subject of each question 
to be covered thoroughly in all answers. One did not 
commit the error of omitting a discussion of a ques- 
tion, even if he knew nothing about it. Once a student' 
who, in response to a question on brucellosis, wrote 
a fine essay on typhoid fever, was quite upset when 
he got no credit for his efforts. When he complained 
to Dr. MacPherson, it was pointed out to him that it 
would be a poor physician who would treat a patient 
for typhoid fever when the diagnosis was brucellosis. 

Some students may remember having their minds 
probed by such questions as: 

Given a live rabbit, a live guinea pig and a suspension 
of sheep red-blood cells, along with any needed reagents 
and equipment, describe in detail what immunological 
principles might be demonstrated. 

Although few publications came from the department 
30 years ago, there was no lack of interest in research. 
One of the first research grants made to the School of 
Medicine was obtained by Dr. MacPherson in the late 
1930's from the Johnson and Johnson Company, for 
the purpose of examining their products for sterility 
and investigating ways of improving their sterilization 
procedures. These funds were used to obtain better 
equipment and laboratory facilities for the depart- 
ment, thus relieving some of the pressures on the de- 
partment's inadequate funds. Dr. MacPherson, with 
an assistant, spent many hours working in a "sterile 
room," lined with stainless steel, which he had de- 
signed for carrying out strict aseptic procedures. In 
these studies he practiced the exacting techniques 
and demonstrated the concern for details which he 
expected from others. 

Although Dr. MacPherson is now retired after 43 years 
of active teaching, he finds that his earlier concern 
over having too little to do is unfounded. He, Mrs. 
MacPherson, and their son live in the home they built 
shortly after coming to Chapel Hill — a home which 
reflects the same qualities of orderliness and perfec- 
tion that characterized him as a scholar, teacher, and 
friend. 



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COMMUNITY PSYCHIATRY: WHAT IS IT? 



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By WILLIAM G. HOLLISTER, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Mental Health 

Director of the Division of Community Psychiatry 



Someone has defined a community psychiatrist as a 
"clinical psychiatrist with an overdeveloped social 
conscience." Certainly every psychiatrist is also, to 
some degree, a community psychiatrist. Ever since the 
advent of the child guidance clinics in America in the 
early 1930's, more and more clinical psychiatrists have 
been moving out to practice their skills and apply their 
knowledges in settings other than the hospital or pri- 
vate office. A study by the American Psychiatric Asso- 
ciation estimates that 80 per cent of its members are 
spending some time providing clinical, diagnostic, 
consultative, and educational services in community 
agencies, schools, or industry. Many of them have 
found that such experiences, in addition to offering in- 
teresting challenges, afford opportunities to render 
important service to individuals who would not ordi- 
narily come to a hospital or a private office. 

As more and more has been learned about the epi- 
demiology of mental health — about the prevalence and 
distribution of psychiatric illness, relationship prob- 
lems, behavior problems, psychophysiological dis- 
orders, and other disorders of human behavior — we 
have accumulated concrete data about the tremen- 
dous scope of the needs in local communities. We 
have learned that only 25 per cent of the people with 
problems of this kind define them as medical in na- 
ture and therefore turn to a general physician or psy- 
chiatrist for help. Most of the mild and moderate 
problems, and some of the severe ones, are taken first 
to the local minister, the public health nurse, or the 
welfare worker; others are first recognized by school 



teachers or brought to the attention of law enforce- 
ment agencies. 

As more prevention-orrented attempts are made to 
reach out and intercept mental and emotional dis- 
orders and disabilities at an earlier stage of develop- 
ment, it is apparent that many of these problems will 
first be discovered and encountered in the basic hu- 
man service agencies of the community. As psychia- 
trists pick up the challenge of doing something con- 
structive about the total endemic of mental and emo- 
tional disorders in the population, they inevitably find 
that they must turn some of their attention to the 
kinds of care of management given (or not given) to 
the majority of such disorders through the framework 
of other agencies, organizations, and professions. 

The clinical psychiatrist who begins to spend more 
time working in community settings soon discovers 
that he needs additional skills and understandings in 
order to apply constructively his basic comprehen- 
sions of human behavior, personality dynamics, and 
interpersonal relationships. As he moves into the 
public school setting, for instance, he finds that he 
needs to understand the roles and functions of guid-* 
ance counselors, school psychologists, school social 
workers, special education teachers, remedial reading 
therapists, and others, so that he can become an effec- 
tive resource for these front-line workers in school 
mental health. 

At first he may be asked to diagnose the cause of a 
child's learning difficulty and make recommendations 
for treatment. Later he may take a few of these chil- 
dren into personal one-to-one therapy. Inevitably he 
finds that the number of children requiring help is far 
beyond the number that he can see personally, and 
that he must learn how to strengthen the abilities of 
the school's own staff to deal constructively with the 
behavior, learning, and emotional problems they en- 
counter day by day in their children. Thus he finds 
himself moving from the role of diagnostician, per- 
sonal therapist, or consultant on a case to that of 
"consultee consultant." As such, he frequently does 
not see the individual patient but works with another 
professional person who has the responsibility for 
management of the situation. The psychiatrist's task 
becomes one of lending his understandings in such a 
way that the members of the school staff can be 
helped to manage not only the case in question, but 
the many other children that they see. 

As the psychiatrist moves into consultee consultation, 
he often is invited to give courses to staff members on 
simple, practical, concrete ways to handle behavior 
problems, effect better relationships, and diminish 
anxieties so that children can put more energy into 
learning. He may teach staff members how to evalu- 
ate children's emotional needs and behavior patterns. 
Later, as the school personnel sense that he really 
understands their mission, resources, and limitations, 
he might be invited to consult on the development of 
special classes for emotionally and mentally handi- 
capped children, the organization of teacher-training 
workshops, and the development of special programs 



8 



to take care of relationship and behavior problems in 
children. 

It is obvious that the psychiatrist must acquire similar 
kinds of new understanding and skills about the com- 
petence of other professions and the service capabili- 
ties of other helping agencies as he moves into other 
areas of community service. As he learns how to be 
helpful to courts and probation workers, to family 
service agencies and marriage counselors, to industry 
with its medical and personnel management depart- 
ments, as well as other agencies for public health, 
welfare, education, correction, and human service, he 
will need to be acquainted with these new frameworks 
of service and with the kinds of personnel that func- 
tion within them, so that he can be instrumental in 
strengthening them. 

As early as 1963, the Department of Psychiatry of the 
University of North Carolina School of Medicine or- 
ganized a committee to study the need for more defini- 
tive instruction of psychiatric residents in the area of 
community psychiatry. The committee recognized that 
much that is pertinent to this area was already being 
taught in the inpatient, outpatient, child psychiatry, 
and hospital consultation sections of the department. 
The committee also recognized, however, that other 
areas of knowledge and learning experience are 
needed for the psychiatrist of the future. They recom- 
mended that a staff be recruited from psychiatrists 
and other professionals who have practiced in com- 
munity settings. 

As a result of the committee's recommendation, the 
department established a new Section on Community 
Psychiatry. Over the last four years a staff has been 
recruited consisting of two psychiatrists, two clinical 
psychologists, a social work consultant, a social scien- 
tist who specializes in research on mental health 
programs, research assistants, and a "mental health 
program analyst" to set up and organize a "iVlental 
Health Materials Center." This latter unit, a unique 
feature in departments of psychiatry, stays ahead 
of the literature by actively collecting, for use in the 
section's teaching and research program, descriptions 
of community programs and the psychiatrists' func- 
tions in community settings. 

The Section on Community Psychiatry has established 
two field stations called "Family Counseling and Edu- 
cation Centers" in nearby rural counties, in order to 
study the delivery of mental health services to rural 
populations and to provide residents and other ad- 
vanced students with field opportunities to gain ex- 
perience in community services. In addition, the 
"Orange-Person County Mental Health Center," devel- 
oped through the cooperation of the medical school 
and the county commissioners of Orange and Person 
counties, has created another framework in which 
residents and other advanced students can gain field 
experience or carry out research on operating pro- 
grams. 

To date, the section has launched three major educa- 
tional programs: 



1. A course called "Basic Community Psychiatry" for 
resident physicians in psychiatry. First-year residents 
attend seminars covering epidemiology, the consulta- 
tion process, a review of the social science studies of 
mental illness, and a review of the psychiatrist's role 
in community agencies and industry. Second-year 
residents are placed in the field stations described 
above. Third-year residents are offered advanced 
placements, with supervision, in nearby mental health 
centers, family service associations, industrial plants, 
and other research or service settings. 

2. An advanced postgraduate training program for "the 
executive staffs of comprehensive community mental 
health programs or centers": psychiatrists, psycholo- 
gists, social scientists, social workers, nurses, adminis- 
trators and local health officers. This is an interdis- 
ciplinary program taught by an interdisciplinary staff. 
Through work with a personal tutor, the trainees are 
provided an individualized program with field experi- 
ences that are under supervision. In addition, they 
participate in advanced courses in administration, 
leadership, program organization, program evaluation, 
epidemiology, and health administration. Some of 
these courses are taught jointly with the School of 
Public Health. 

3. A continuing education course in "Mental Health 
Center Operations," given in coordination with mental 
health authorities in the fourteen Southeastern states. 
This course is given twice a year for selected adminis- 
trators and clinical directors of local mental health 
centers, who are chosen by their respective state de- 
partments of mental health. This is an intensive, 
short-term course designed to help clinicians and ad- 
ministrators coming from other backgrounds to be- 
come oriented and specifically trained to operate a 
comprehensive community mental health center — a 
new type of local agency developing over the nation. 

The staff of the Section on Community Psychiatry 
practice what they preach. They all spend one to 
three days a week working in the community in the 
area of program development, consultation, clinical 
service, and research. They hope that they are pro- 
viding working models of this particular subspecialty 
of psychiatry, so that students in the School of Medi- 
cine and house officers in Memorial Hospital can be 
oriented to serve a wider range of the population by 
working in various community settings on a part-time 
or a full-time basis. 



UNCS "MEDIC-AIR" SERVICE 




By LIN CAMPBELL 

Public Information Officer 

Division of Education and Research in Community 

Medical Care 



Although the "medic-air" service of the UNC School 
of Medicine is relatively new, its nnaturity — in terms 
of proving the concept of medical mobility — has been 
reached already. In December of 1967 the Division of 
Education and Research in Community Medical Care, 
under the direction of Dr. W. Reece Berryhill, began an 
air transportation system for faculty members at the 
schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health, and 
for members of the North Carolina Regional Medical 
Program. This service was carried out with a new 
twin-engine Cessna 337 "push-pull" airplane. That air- 
craft, and one just like it which was added in October, 
1968, were obtained with funds donated by some 60 
private businesses and citizens in North Carolina. 

Because the flight demands became greater than one 
flying physician and one faculty pilot could realisti- 
cally meet, a full-time pilot joined the staff of the di- 
vision in July, 1968. His job is to fly the existing air- 
craft and to develop an aviation program commen- 
surate with the needs of the university and the state. 
The pilot, Lt. Col. Earl D. Provancha, USAF (Ret.), is 
assisted by Dr. Carl B. Lyie— who flew prior to his 
arrival — and a full-time pilot, Mr. Carl Travis, operator 
of a local flying school. 

The two airplanes are in constant use and in even 
greater demand. Regular flights are made on biweekly, 
weekly, bimonthly, and monthly schedules in order 
to enable UNC staff physicians to hold clinics through- 
out the state. In addition, they fly numerous miscel- 
laneous health care missions. 

Each month, orthopedic clinics are held in Jackson- 
ville, Tarboro, and Elizabeth City. Two orthopedic sur- 
geons and a brace specialist take half a day away 
from Chapel Hill to spend it in the eastern part of the 
state, where physicians, particularly orthopedic spe- 
cialists, are scarce. These clinics have been in exist- 
ence for at least 12 years, but the travel time required 
for the physicians involved has been drastically cut 
since the advent of the air service. Whereas it takes 



more than four hours to drive to Elizabeth City, flight 
time is only 55 minutes, and during the flight the 
orthopedists are free to read, write, discuss, or dictate. 
The clinics in Jacksonville used to require the special- 
ists to be away from Chapel Kill for as long as 24 
hours. Now the orthopedic team can fly to Jackson- 
ville, see 50 or more patients, and be back in Chapel 
Hill in five hours. 

A monthly surgical consultation is held at the Wilson 
Clinic in Wilson. One surgeon and two medical stu- 
dents on the surgery rotation are flown there on the 
third Thursday of each month. They consult on a num- 
ber of cases and discuss them with the assembled 
staff. On the return trip, discussion of cases further 
extends the active learning process for the students. 
Average time away from Chapel Hill is four hours. 

In Morganton, the School for the Deaf, the Broughton 
State Mental Hospital, and the Western Carolina Cen- 
ter for children with multiple handicaps had long been 
without the services of an otolaryngologist. Since 
November, 1968, however, bimonthly otolaryngology 
clinics have been held for the population of these 
three state institutions— a total of more than 3000 
persons. This air-mobile clinic was designed by mem- 
bers of the Otolaryngology Division of the Department 
of Surgery and the Division of Education and Research 
in Community Medical Care. It is hoped that the ser- 
vices of the otolaryngology clinic will soon be open 
to the entire four-county health complex in which 
Morganton lies.^ At present, the otolaryngologists and 
an audiologist screen and treat the patients from all 
three institutions in the Western Carolina Center's 
operating facility. Those patients who require more 
extensive therapy are referred to NCMH. 

There is also a weekly exchange between UNC and 
New Hanover Memorial Hospital in Wilmington. This 
exchange was designed by the departments of sur- 
gery and pediatrics at both institutions in conjunction 
with the Division of Education and Research in Com- 




Dr. Frank C. Wilson, Mr. Curtis Jones and Dr. James Hundley 
at the Tarboro airport. After treating 64 patients the physicians 
and brace specialist are ready to return to Chapel Hill. 



1. The Regional Health Council of Eastern Appalachia, Inc., is 
composed of Alexander, Burke, Caldwell, and McDowell counties. 



10 




Dr. Newton D. Fischer and patient on a clinic visit to Western 
Carolina Center at Morganton. 

munity Medical Care. Through this program, surgeons 
from Wilmington come to Chapel Hill each Wednesday 
to hold discussions with students, to "scrub in" with 
the surgeons at NCMH, and to attend postoperative 
conferences. Conversely, surgeons from Chapel Hill 
visit the New Hanover Memorial Hospital. Students on 
the surgery rotation at the university may elect to 
spend one day in Wilmington, following a community 
hospital surgeon through a workday. UNC pediatri- 
cians in the subspecialties of cardiology, neurology, 
hematology, and allergy also make weekly trips to 
Wilmington in an effort to expand the pediatric ser- 
vices at New Hanover Memorial Hospital. The essence 
of the Chapel Hill-Wilmington program is that it pro- 
vides for a mutually beneficial exchange between a 
community hospital and a teaching hospital. 

The incidental flights made in addition to the regularly 
scheduled clinics cover a wide and varied spectrum. 
Members of the Division of Education and Research in 
Community Medical Care make constant use of the 
aircraft for quick visits to their several projects in di- 
verse communities. The projects requiring most of the 
division's on-location time at present are two in Wil- 
mington and one in Tarboro. Frequent trips to Wilson 
and to communities in the western part of the state 
are also necessary, and many other consultative and/ 
or work missions require at least a few sporadic trips 
by members of the division. 

Other flights take faculty members and North Carolina 
Regional Medical Program personnel to deliver ad- 
dresses at medical society meetings, and to help with 
the development of the various health-planning coun- 
cils that are burgeoning in all sections of the state. 
Faculty attending conferences in Atlantic City find the 
two-hour-and-fifteen-minute flight by Medic-Air a real 
time-saver. Two hours after leaving his office. Dean 
Taylor can be at the National Institutes of Health in 
Washington. 

The medical school's aircraft have been called on to 
perform some rather special services as well — for in- 
stance, the delivery of a blood specimen from a man 
serving time in a prison farm in Edgecombe County to 



the hematologists at UNC. The man's mother, a pa- 
tient in Memorial Hospital, was suffering from an ap- 
parent blood disorder, and for diagnosis a sample of 
her son's blood needed to be studied for possible 
common defects. On emergency occasions, Medic-Air 
has carried special plasma fractions (developed in the 
UNC Department of Pathology) to patients with bleed- 
ing disorders living in areas remote from specialized 
treatment centers. The planes are also used by the 
Regional Organ Donor Program to transport kidneys 
for transplantation. 

As of January 1, 1970, the university's two airplanes 
had flown more than 200 passengers a total of 442,000 
passenger miles in the interest of North Carolina 
medicine. At the present time the two aircraft account 
for 1500 passenger miles per working day. It has been 
estimated that, in only one year, this flight service 
has saved a total of 14,733 man-hours. 

It has been suggested that the medical center's air- 
mobility may be an answer to the medical problems of 
rural populations. Rapid air transit makes it possible 
for medical academicians to see community-based 
medicine, for community physicians to come to the 
teaching center for research or short courses, and for 
areas without specialists, or even without physicians, 
to have medical attention. 

Although the University of North Carolina School of 
Medicine has not been airborne very long, its air 
transportation program has been successful in every 
way, and there are plans to expand the program to 
meet the increasing demands. 




Mr. Joe Ferguson, brace specialist, and Dr. Edwin T. Preston, 
orthopedic surgeon, at Elizabeth City airport, on a clinic day at 
the Elizabeth City Health Center. 



11 



THE BIRTH DEFECTS TREATMENT CENTER 




By JAMES E. ETHERIDGE, JR., M.D. 

Former Director of The Birth Defects Treatment Center 



The Birth Defects Treatment Center at North Carolina 
IVIemorial Hospital offers a multidisciplinary approach 
to case-finding and treatment of infants and children 
with structural or metabolic disorders present at birth. 
The center is staffed by its director (Dr. Robert T. 
Herrington), a social worker (Mrs. Linda Howden), an 
orthopedic resident (Dr. Jack C. Childers), a physical 
therapist (Mrs. Judy Beswick), and a full-time secretary 
(Mrs. Mary Mize). Also available to the patients are 
the services of the entire staff of each outpatient 
clinic. The Birth Defects Treatment Center is supported 
by a grant from the National Foundation — March of 
Dimes. 

Because North Carolina Memorial Hospital is located 
in a small community, most of the patients seen at the 
center are referred from other towns. Thus the treat- 
ment program initiated at the center is necessarily 
dependent on the patient's family, local medical re- 
sources and community for its continuation. To 
achieve this coordinated approach, the plan is to work 
with the referring physician, in most cases to utilize 
the health services in the patient's community, and 
to give the patient periodic evaluations until it is felt 
that he has received the maximum benefit from the 
Birth Defects Treatment Center program. The family 
physician is always informed of findings, and sugges- 
tions are made for management of the patient during 
the period between evaluations. When the patient is 
finally discharged to the care of his local physician — 
usually during his late teens — it is always explained 
to the physician and to the patient that the center is 
available for re-evaluation and further treatment if 
these are needed. 

A major effort has been made to increase participation 
of the referring physician in local follow-up of the 
patient (including both treatment and medical and 
environmental support) as well as in case-finding. The 



staff of the center works closey with the referring phy- 
sician and the community to encourage community 
awareness of the patient's needs and support for 
measures enabling patients with birth defects to re- 
ceive education, job training, and finally employment. 
This community support has enabled the center to 
discharge more patients to the care of their local 
physicians and thus to accept more new patients who 
would not otherwise receive specialized care. 

The importance of the family and community in the 
management of patients with birth defects has be- 
come more and more apparent. Because of the harm 
that can be done by misinformation, anxiety, and fears 
in regard to birth defects, the social worker frequently 
visits the patient's family before the patient is seen 
in the treatment center. In her initial interview with 
the parents, she tells them about clinical procedures 
and policies, gathers a social history, assesses the 
psycho-social impact of the birth defect on the child 
and the parents, and evaluates the significance of the 
material obtained. She participates in diagnostic and 
treatment conferences, aids in the initial interpreta- 
tion of the medical findings, and is available for con- 
sultation regarding program planning. She offers case- 
work and consultation services to patients and their 
families during clinic visits, helps them handle the 
problems of continuing treatment, and coordinates pro- 
ifessional services to the patient. Finally, she serves as 
the liaison between the hospital and the community, 
makes referrals to community agencies, visits the 
community, and offers educational services in the 
area of birth defects and their concomitant social 
problems. 

Communities throughout the state are coming to rec- 
ognize that patients with birth defects can obtain com- 
plete and comprehensive treatment from the program. 
Physicians and health agencies are even beginning to 
refer patients with chronic or crippling diseases not 
related to birth defects. 




Drs. Lore Knetsch and Robert T. Herrington examine syndac- 
tylism victim. 



12 




Nurse Adams offers encouragement and guidance to one of the 
center's small patients. 

The program of the Birth Defects Treatment Center is 
interpreted to the professional community in several 
different ways. A brochure describing the entire pe- 
diatric program at the North Carolina IVIemorial Hos- 
pital and including information about the center has 
been mailed to pediatricians, general practitioners, 
and health and welfare agencies in North Carolina. 
Members of the staff have also discussed the activi- 
ties of the center at numerous local meetings through- 
out the state and plan to continue doing so. 

The Birth Defects Treatment Center also provides a 
teaching program in the medical school. Formal lec- 
tures and seminars concerning birth defects are given 
to the medical and physical therapy students, and 
special students in the School of Public Health. House 
officers working on the wards and in the outpatient 
department come in contact with all patients in the 
program. Emphasis is constantly being placed on 
the training of future physicians in the multiple physi- 
cal, psychological, social, and environmental aspects 
of birth defects. 

Birth defects seen at the center between July, 1969 
and January, 1970 included: metabolic disorders, de- 
fects involving the nervous and cardiovascular sys- 
tems, anomalies of the skeletal system, abnormalities 
of the eye, genitourinary abnormalities and facial 
malformations. 

The primary purpose of the Birth Defects Treatment 
Center is to demonstrate to local communities, to the 
medical school, and to the state the advantages of the 
team approach in evaluating children with birth de- 
fects. It is hoped that eventually every child so handi- 
capped will be handled in this manner. By continuous 
evaluation of the program for managing a limited 
number of patients, it will be possible to devise the 
best methods for diagnostic evaluation, treatment, and 
follow-up of cases. 



THE COUNTRY DOCTOR MUSEUM 

By IVIE LANE WILDER 
Spring Hope, N. C. 



The only purely medical museum to be found in 
America was dedicated on December 1968 in Bailey, 
North Carolina. Known as the Country Doctor Mu- 
seum, it is housed in a building which is a composite 
of the offices of two nineteenth-century doctors. The 
front portion of the building came from the office of 
Dr. Howard Franklin Freeman of Wilson County and 
was built in 1857. The back portion was the office of 
Dr. Cornelius H. Brantley, who began the practice of 
medicine in Nash County in 1884. 

Besides its collections of medical instruments and 
books, the museum displays an antique doctor's of- 
fice and apothecary shop, as well as a number of price- 
less pharmacy antiques which have been placed there 
on "extended loan" by the facility's honorary curator, 
Mr. Sydney N. Blumberg of Newton, Connecticut. 

Most of the medical tools come from five large col- 
lections given the museum. These formerly belonged 
to four Tar Heel physicians (J. Meigs Flippin, Robert 
Lee Flippin, Wood Tucker Johnson and Needham B. 
Herring) and to a Civil War surgeon, Dr. Matthew 
Moore Butler of Bristol, Tennessee. (Dr. Butler, one of 
the signers of the Articles of Surrender, assisted Dr. 
Hunter McGuire in the amputation of General "Stone- 
wall" Jackson's left arm.) Many other individuals have 
donated medical antiques, and the library acquired by 
the late Dr. Millard Hill of Raleigh was recently pre- 
sented to the museum. 

A local physician. Dr. Josephine E. Newell, conceived 
the idea of the museum and is president of the non- 
profit corporation under which it is operated. A major 
benefactor of the museum is Mrs. Pauline Massengill 
DeFriece of Bristol. She is a daughter of the late Dr. 




The museum is open to the public from 2 until 5 p.m. on Sun- 
days and from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Wednesdays. Special tours 
may be arranged at other times. 



13 



Samuel E. Massengilt who established the S. E. Massen- 
gill Laboratories, one of the oldest pharmaceutical 
houses in the nation. 

Curator Blumberg, a retired pharmacist and internation- 
ally known collector of medical and pharmaceutical 
antiques, is largely responsible for the 1890 American 
pharmacy in the Smithsonian Institute. The shelf-ware 
at the Ephraim McDowell Museum in Danville, Kentucky, 
is from his collection. His collection of Dutch pharmacy 
delftware is now on loan to the North Carolina Museum 
of Art in Raleigh. 

Some of the artifacts contained in the museum were 
shown in New York at the meeting of the American Medi- 
cal Association: an ivory (Laennec) stethoscope, a hand- 
blown nursing bottle, a pewter pressure irrigator made 
in France, and saddlebags (complete with vials of medi- 
cines) used by a horseback-riding country doctor. 





Left — Majolica syrup ewers (Savona, Italy, 1683). The ewers, used 
for storing and dispensing medicinal syrup, bear tfie coat-of-arms 
and initials of the original owner. (Blumberg collection.) 

Right — White porcelain leech jar (Germany, late 19th century). The 
perforated cover permitted the leeches to breathe while inside; 
they were kept in fresh water. (Blumberg collection.) 



PRESENTING THE HOUSE STAFF 



By Gordon B. LeGrand 

Resident and Instructor in Pathology 





George Hemingway 



Samuel W. Smith, Jr. 



GEORGE HEMINGWAY, the chief resident in pediatrics, 
grew up in Winston-Salem, N. C. and graduated from 
Reynolds High School. He received his collegiate educa- 



tion at Davidson College as a member of the class of 
1958. In 1963 Dr. Hemingway graduated from our school 
and served a mixed internship in medicine and pedia- 
trics at N.C.M.H. the following year. 

After a year of residency in internal medicine here, Dr. 
Hemingway entered the Army. He served his first year 
at Na Trang, Vietnam with a clearing company that han- 
dled the overflow of medical patients from field hospitals 
in that area. He returned to the United States for a 
year's tour at Womack Army Hospital, Fort Bragg, to com- 
plete his service obligation. 

His medical training continued at N.C.M.H.: a second 
year of residency in internal medicine; two years of 
residency in pediatrics. 

Dr. Hemingway is one of the first participants in the 
N.C.M.H. residency program designed to prepare phy- 
sicians for family practice. In July 1970 he will join Dr. 
Lawrence Cutchin ('62) of the Tarboro Clinic in a family_ 
practice partnership. They hope to have medical stu- 
dents and house officers from Chapel Hill join them to 
observe first hand the type of medical practice that is 
possible in this setting. 

Dr. Hemingway and his wife, the former Lynn Blalock of 
Winston-Salem, have three children— Susan, age 8; Chip, 
age 5 and Alice, age 3. 



SAMUEL WILSON SMITH, JR., a native of Charlotte, 
N. C, is chief resident in medicine. An alumnus of 
Episcopal High School, he graduated from Davidson 
College in 1959 and received his M.D. degree from the 
University of Pennsylvania. He interned in medicine at 
N.C.M.H. in 1963-1964. 

Military service called Dr. Smith to Andrews Air Force 
base in Washington, D. C. where he spent two years as 
a general medical officer. He was awarded the Air Force 
Commendation Medal at the completion of his tour. 

Dr. Smith returned to Chapel Hill as a fellow in hema- 
tology in 1966. During that year he co-authored two 
papers dealing with the hemolytic effects of granulo- 
cytes. From 1957 to the present he has been a resident 
in internal medicine. For the last six months of this 
period he will again be a fellow in hematology. 

Dr. Smith is married to the former Laura Simmons of 
Cooperstown, N. Y. They have two sons — Sam, 6, and Will, 
3 — and a daughter, Susan, who is 1 year old. The Smiths 
will move to Greenville, S. C. in June where Dr. Smith 
plans to enter the private practice of internal medicine 
in partnership with Dr. William P. Algary ('63). 



14 



Summer 




i 1 

1 




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1 Don A. Gabriel (72)— Biochemistry. 

2 James S. McFadden (71) — Medicine clerkship. 

3 Richard T, Holderness (72) and G. Terry Stewart (71)— Psy- 
chiatry. 

4 Christine 0. Suberman (70)— Medicine and Ob. Gyn. rota- 
tions. 

5 Peter R. Bream (72)— Pathology. 

6 E. Jane Meschan (71) (left), Henry H. Atkins II (72) (cen- 
ter) and William W. Webb (71) (right)— King's Fund College 
of Hospital Management (England). 




15 





^M, 




1 Fred D. Powell and Sampson E. Harrell (72)— Psychiatry. 

2 Charles E. Crumley (70)— Surgery. 
Ann C. Mortell (71)— Medicine clerkship. 
Carol K. Aschenbrener (71)— Pathology. 
David A. Rendleman III (70)— Pediatrics. 
Jonathan 0. McLean (71) — Medicine clerkship. 
Donald C. Nagel (72)— Physiology. 



8 H. Clifford Baggett and Robert B. Jones (70)— Surgery rota- 
tion. 



Thomas G. Irons (72)— Pathology. 




16 




J. Frederick Wolfe (72)— Biochemistry. 

Robert W. Little (72)— Psychiatry. 

James S. Fulghum (71)— Medicine clerkship. 

David E. Sharp (72)— Pathology. 

John E. Hanna (70)— On a Parisian leave wUWe in thoracic 
surgery at Arhus Kummunehospital (Denmark). 

William J. Busby (70)— Radiology and Ob. Gyn. rotations. 

Philip D. Meador, Jr. (71)— Medicine clerkship. 




17 




1 D. Clark Bright (71)— Psychiatry clerkship. 

2 Donald D. Howe (70)— Ob. Gyn. and Surgery rotations. 

3 E. Lance Walker (70)— Medicine, Radiology and Medicine- 
Pediatrics rotations. 

4 J. Richard Auman (71)— Psychiatry clerkship. 

5 Gilbert C. White II (71), Joseph M. Harmon (70) and Neil 
Chafetz (70)— Pathology. Don A Gabriel (72)— Biochemistry. 

6 Michael J. Kirby (72)— Physiology. 

7 James B. Sloan (70)— Ophthalmology rotation. 

8 Charles E. Thompson (70) — Pediatrics and Medicine rota- 
tions. 




18 





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1 John F. Moore (73)— Pathology. 

2 Robert L. Kuykendal (71)— Psychiatry 
clerkship. 

3 S. Clarkson Sugg, Jr. (72)— Bartending at 
Glacier Park, Mont. 

4 J. Ronald Hunt (72)— Medicine clerkship. 

5 William E. Long (72)— Biochemistry. 

6 Frederick W. Henderson (70)— Pediatrics. 

7 Steven P. Dewees (71)— Psychiatry clerk- 
ship. 

8 John V. Allcott III (71)— Psychiatry clerk- 
ship. 

9 Roberta S. Gray (72)— Physical Therapy. 



19 



Fall-Winter 




20 




21 




22 



News from the Hill 




DR. CHARLES W. HOOKER retired 
on May 31, 1969 as chairman of the 
Department of Anatomy, after 20 
years of serving in that capacity. 

Dr. Hooker — a Virginian — obtained 
his education at Duke University 
(A.B., 1930; A.iVi., 1932; Ph.D., 1933), 
spent one year at the University of 
Rochester as a National Research 
Council Fellow, and returned to 
Duke University for a research fel- 
lowship in medicine until 1936. He 
was an instructor in anatomy at Tu- 
lane University during the academic 
year 1936-37, and then joined the 
faculty of Yale University with the 
same rank. Through the years he 
was promoted to associate profes- 
sor. He left New Haven in 1948 to 
become a professor of cytology at 
Emory University. A year later, he 
came to Chapel Hill as professor 
and chairman of the Department 
of Anatomy. 

Since he arrived in Chapel Hill in 
1949, Dr. Hooker has inspired many 
freshmen medical students with 
his unusually competent teaching. 
He has been noted for being able 
to open students' eyes to the need 
for critical and objective evaluation 
of scientific material. He is person- 
ally known by his colleagues for 
his basic contributions to the biol- 
ogy of cancer, his research having 
resulted in the publication of 55 
scientific articles. 

The school is pleased that Dr. 
Hooker will continue within the De- 
partment of Anatomy as a contribu- 
tor to both the teaching and re- 
search programs. 



24 



The Department of Pharmacology 
has been awarded four research 
grants totaling $168,299. The Na- 
tional Institute of Mental Health is 
to support two independent proj- 
ects on alcohol and marijuana. DR. 
FRED W. ELLIS is to direct a re- 
search program on chronic intake 
and withdrawal of alcohol in ani- 
mals and DR. LOUIS S. HARRIS 
one on the pharmacology of trans- 
tetrahydrocannabinol, the pure ac- 
tive ingredient in marijuana. 

DR. WILLIAM H. PEARLMAN is to 
be the principal investigator on two 
different projects: "Steroid-protein 
interactions and human breast can- 
cer" (funded by the National Can- 
cer Institute) and "Steroid-protein 
interactions in serum and in steroid- 
hormone-responsive tissues" (to be 
supported by the National Science 
Foundation). 



In gathering news items, it became 
obvious that the summer of 1969 
was one for traveling afar. Mem- 
bers of our faculty participated in 
a variety of international meetings 
held in foreign countries: 

As reported in our last issue, DRS. 
WILLIAM B. BLYTHE, CRAIGE 
COLE, and LOUIS G. WELT (Medi- 
cine) were participants in the IVth 
International Congress of Nephrol- 
ogy held in Stockholm in late June. 

DR. EDWARD CLASSMAN (Biochem- 
istry) attended a meeting on "The 
Pituitary-Adrenal Axis and the Ner- 
vous System" held in Vierhouten 
(Netherlands) on July 22-24. He 
presented a paper on "Brain func- 
tion and RNA," co-authored by DR. 
JOHN E. WILSON (Biochemistry). 

DR. ROBERT SMITH (Prev. Medicine 
& Medicine) participated in the 
King's Fund (College of Hospital 
Management course (June 30-August 
1) in England. Seven of the 18 
American and Canadian students of 
medicine and hospital administra- 
tion enrolled in the course were 
from our school: MISS E. JANE 
MESCHAN ('71), MESSRS. HENRY 
H. ATKINS II ('72), LARRY W. 



BOYLES (70), WILLIAM A. LAM- 
BETH III ('71), WILLIAM W. WEBB, 
JR. ('71), and LEE A WHITEHURST 
('72). 

DRS. LOUIS S. HARRIS and PHILIP 
F. HIRSCH (Pharmacology) attended 
the IVth International Congress on 
Pharmacology in Basel, July 14-18. 

Dr. Harris presented two papers: 
"Bentazocine in the adrenal corti- 
cal stress response of rats" and 
"Acetylcholine turnover in brain 
slices: effect of narcotics and nar- 
cotic antagonists." 

Dr. Hirsch also attended the II 
International Symposium on Cal- 
citonin and C Cells in London,. 
July 21-24, where he spoke on 
"Thyrocalcitonin and parathyroid 
hormone in the hamster." 

DR. JOHN A. EWING (Psychiatry) 
presented results of his survey on 
138 undergraduate students regard- 
ing use of marijuana to the Second 
International Congress of Social 
Psychiatry (London, August 4-9). 

DR. CARL E. ANDERSON (Biochem- 
istry) was a delegate at the Vlllth 
International Congress of Nutrition 
held early in the summer in Prague. 
He attended the congress under a 
grant from the American Institute 
of Nutrition. 

Three members of the Department 
of Pathology participated in the 
World Federation of Hemophilia 
meeting held in conjunction with 
the XII Congress of the International 
Society of Blood Transfusion (Mos- 
cow, August 17-23). 

Department chairman DR. K. M. 
BRINKHOUS officially represented 
the National Hemophilia Foundation 
and delivered a paper on "Plasma 
concentrates in the therapy of he- 
mophilia A." 

In his presentation on "Current 
status of organ transplantation in 
hemophilia A", DR. GEORGE D. 
PENICK reported work done with 
DR. WILLIAM P. WEBSTER (also 
Sch. Dentistry), DR. CHARLES F. 
ZUKOSKI (Surgery) and MR. ROB- • 
ERT L REDDICK (Pathology) under I 



the auspices of the John A. Hart- 
ford Foundation. The Foundation 
supports investigations on the origin 
of blood clotting factors as demon- 
strated by organ transplantation 
techniques. 

DR. HAROLD R. ROBERTS (also 
Medicine) commented on recent 
developments in the management 
of circulating inhibitors to blood 
coagulation factor VIII. His paper 
was entitled "Clinical management 
of circulating inhibitors in hemo- 
philiacs." 

DRS. PENICK and ROBERTS also 
attended the Vth Congress of the 
Asian and Pacific Society of Haema- 
tology in Istanbul and spoke at the 
Vlth Congress of the Yugoslav Phys- 
iological Society in Ohrid (Yugo- 
slavia). 



^h * 


*.p.i 



During their stay in Yugoslavia, they 
were hosted by former research 
associates in the Department of 
Pathology, DRS. IVAN I. DEJANOV 
(left) and ALEXANDER G. NAUMOV- 
SKI (center). 

DR. ERICK SCHOPLER (Psychiatry) 

took part in both the international 
Congress of Psychology and the 
International Congress of Social 
Psychiatry, held in London in Au- 
gust; he also lectured at the Psy- 
chiatric Institute of the Maudsley 
Hospital in London. The theme of 
his presentations was the parents 
of psychotic children, but in each 
instance Dr. Schopler elaborated 
on a different aspect of the prob- 
lems and functions of such individ- 
uals. DR. ROBERT J. REICHLER 
(Psychiatry) collaborated in some 
of this work. Upon his return to the 
U.S. Dr. Schopler spoke on "Parents 
of psychotic children as scapegoats" 
at the American Psychological As- 
sociation symposium on "Can Par- 
ents Function as Developmental 
Agents for Their Impaired Child?" 
(Washington, D. C, September 3). 



DRS. GEORGE K. SUMMER (Bio- 
chemistrv & Pediatrics) and HENRY 
N. KIRKMAN (Pediatrics) attended 
the llird International Conference 
on Congenital Malformations held 
in The Hague (September 7-13). 
Dr. Summer reported on studies on 
hyperlipemia in glycogen storage 
disease performed by him and MR. 
JOHN T. CUTTINO, JR. (71). Dr. 
Kirkman addressed the Conference 
on two occasions speaking on "Dom- 
inant mutations — biochemical basis 
for phenotype" and "Enzyme ab- 
normalities and developing sys- 
tems." 

DR. JOSEPH S. PAGANO (Bacteriol- 
ogy 8c Medicine) lectured on "Virus 
vaccine" at the University of Mon- 
treal (September 4); and on "The 
biologic activity of SVm DNA" at 
the Swiss Cancer Research Insti- 
tute, Lausanne (September 15) and 
at the Cantacuzino Institute in 
Bucharest (September 17). 



Five Kenan Professors and three 
Alumni Distinguished Professors 
were appointed at UNC in the sum- 
mer. Three of the professorships 
were awarded to members of the 
medical faculty: DRS. CARL W. 
GOTTSCHALK (Medicine & Physiol- 
ogy) and J. LOGAN IRVIN (Biochem- 
istry), Kenan Professors; DR. LOUIS 
G. WELT (Medicine), Alumni Dis- 
tinguished Professor. 

Kenan professorships, regarded as 
one of the top honors for UNC fac- 
ulty members, are supported by the 
Kenan Professorship Endowment 
and Reserve Fund. Alumni Distin- 
guished professorships are compar- 
able in rank and made possible 
through the University's Alumni 
Annual Giving Program. 

Born and educated in Virginia, Dr. 
Gottschalk obtained a B.S. degree 
from Roanoke College in 1942 and 
the M. D. degree from the Univer- 
sity of Virginia in 1945. 

Prior to joining our faculty in 
1952, he served a two year tour of 
duty with the U.S. Army, spent an 
equal period of time at Harvard 
Medical School as a research fellow 
in physiology and another two years 
as a resident in medicine at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital. 



He came to Chapel Hill as an in- 
structor in medicine and within nine 
years had been promoted to the 
rank of professor in the Depart- 
ments of Medicine and Physiology. 




Among the many distinctions he has 
received, Dr. Gottschalk was made 
an Established Investigator of the 
American Heart Association from 
1957 to 1961 and a Career Investi- 
gator in 1961. In 1966, Roanoke 
College conferred on him an Hon- 
orary Sc.D. degree; he was also the 
recipient of a Modern Medicine 
Distinguished Achievement Award 
and of the 1967 North Carolina 
Award. Last spring, our student 
body chose him to receive The 
Professor Award. 

Dr. Gottschalk has held many im- 
portant national positions, including 
membership in the editorial board 
of Physiological Reviews and chair- 
manship of a special federal com- 
mittee on kidney disease, but he 
also has given dedicated and in- 
fluential service on many commit- 
tees within our medical center. A 
productive investigator, he has pub- 
lished about 80 scientific papers 
and is widely recognized for his 
contributions to our knowledge of 
renal physiology gained largely 
through the utilization of micro- 
puncture techniques. 

Dr. Irvin, a native of Florida, holds 
a B.S. degree from the University 
of South Carolina (1934) and a Ph.D. 
degree from the University of Penn- 
sylvania (1938). 

He began his teaching career at 
Wayne University College of Medi- 
cine as an instructor in physiologi- 
cal chemistry. He occupied the 
same position at Johns Hopkins 
School of Medicine, becoming an 



25 



assistant professor in 1943. In 1950 
he joined the faculty of our Depart- 
ment of Biochemistry with the rank 
of associate professor, which he 
held until 1957 when he became 
professor and departmental chair- 
man. Before occupying the chair, 
he spent several months at the 
National Institutes of Health as a 
Guggenheim Fellow. 




Dr. Irvin has been a regular and 
vital contributor to the administra- 
tion of the medical school, as well 
as other university departments, 
through his participation in key 
committees. He has also been ac- 
tive in regional, state and national 
organizations, mainly in the North 
Carolina Heart Association. 

His current research interests are 
molecular biology and the synthesis 
of proteins and nucleic acids in 
cell nuclei and isolation and func- 
tions of histones. He has published 
more than 60 articles and 50 ab- 
stracts. 




Dr. Welt was born in New Jersey 
and was granted degrees from the 
New York University (B.A., 1934) 
and Yale University School of Medi- 
cine (M.D., 1938). He trained at 
New Haven Hospital and upon com- 
pletion of his residency was ap- 
pointed assistant at Yale becoming 



an instructor a year later. He joined 
the U.S. Army in 1942, serving until 
1946. After his discharge he entered 
private practice for a year, simul- 
taneously holding an oppointment 
as clinical instructor at Yale. He 
spent a year as chief of the Re- 
search Section of the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Central Office (Wash- 
ington, D.C.). 1948-52 found him 
working full time in New Haven as 
U.S.P.H.S. fellow and then as assist- 
ant professor of medicine at Yale, 
associate attending physician at 
New Haven Hospital and consultant 
at Windham Community Hospital. 

Dr. Welt came to UNC in 1952 as 
associate professor of medicine. 
Being promoted to professor in 
1954, he became department chair- 
man in 1965. In 1963 he was the 
recipient of a U.S.P.H.S. Research 
Career Award. 

An active researcher whose bibli- 
ography lists more than 100 articles 
and over 60 abstracts, he also con- 
tributes to the medical literature 
by being a member of the editorial 
board of six professional journals. 

Dr. Welt has made many contribu- 
tions at the national and interna- 
tional levels, currently holding such 
important positions as: president of 
the American Society of Nephrol- 
ogy; member of the National Ad- 
visory Council and of the Advisory 
Council ad hoc committee to review 
extramural support for research in 
nephrology of NIH's National Insti- 
tute of Arthritis and Metabolic Di- 
seases; member of the Executive 
Committee of the American Heart 
Association Council on Circulation 
(Renal Section); etc. 

The first kidney transplant under 
the regional transplant sharing pro- 
gram was performed here on July 
3. Hospitals in an area from At- 
lanta to Baltimore are to partici- 
pate in the program which began 
on July 1. 

Invited by Cornell University School 
of Engineering, DR. REGINALD G. 
MASON (Pathology) participated in 
a seminar on biomaterials at that 
institution, lecturing on "Thrombo- 
genic and athrombogenic materials" 
(July 29). 



DR. TOMMY B. GRIFFIN has re- 
turned to the Hill as assistant pro- 
fessor of medicine, after three years 
of military service. Born in Ohio, 
he is a graduate of Davidson Col- 
lege and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania (M.D.). He served his intern- 
ship and residency at NCMH where 
he was also a fellow from 1964-66. 



DR. PETER HUTCHIN (Surgery) left 
the school to accept a position at 
the University of California. 



DR. GEORGE JOHNSON (Surgery) 
has been named chief of the re- 
cently created Division of General 
Surgery (Vascular and Traumatic). 
The new division is to emphasize 
patient care, education and research 
in surgical diseases of the blood 
vessels and in injuries resulting- 
from accidents. 



DRS. EMILY S. BARROW and PAN- 
AYATIS G. lATRIDIS, who had been 
research associates in the depart- 
ments of Pathology and Physiology, 
respectively, have been appointed 
to the rank of assistant professor. 




DR. GERALD W. FERNALD (Pediat- 
rics) is the recipient of a Research 
Career Development Award from 
the National Institute of Allergy and 
Infectious Diseases. The five-year 
award was effective July 1 and will 
provide funds for Dr. Farnald's re- 
search on immunology of myco- 
piasm.a pneumoniae diseases. In 
December he participated in an 
NIH sponsored conference on "Sec- 
retory Immunologic System" pre- 
senting a paper on "Local immune 
mechanisms in respiratory infection 
due to mycoplasma pneumoniae." 



26 



In pursuit of his researcii, Dr. Fer- 
naid is currently on a year's leave 
of absence and is working in the 
Division of Immunology at Duke 
University Medical Center. 

Promotions to assistant professor: 
DR. NORTON G. JOLLY (Anesthesiol- 
ogy); DRS. EUGENE M. BOZYMSKI 
and WILLIAM P. HOOD (Medicine); 
DR. FAUSTINO C. GUINTO (Radiol- 
ogy); DR. ELAINE L. GOOLSBY 
(Social Service); DRS. JEANNE A. 
ANDERSON, LLOYD S. ANDERSON, 
ALBERT A. BECHTOLDT, A. GRIS- 
WOLD BEVIN, W. PAUL BIGGERS 
and PEGGY SUE WILLIAMS (Sur- 
gery). 

DR. WILLIAM G. WYSOR, JR. (Medi- 
cine) has left academic medicine to 
enter private practice in Durham. 

MR. JAMES S. HUTCHESON has 
been appointed instructor in the 
Department of Psychiatry where he 
had been a consulting engineer 
since 1964. 

DR. RONALD C. REITZ, new assist- 
ant professor of biochemistry, had 
been a research associate (NIH 
post-doctoral fellow) at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan since 1966. A 
Texan, he is a graduate of Texas 
A & M University and holds the 
Ph.D. degree from Tulane Univer- 
sity. 

DR. ANTHONY F. BARTHOLOMAY 
(Surgery & Pharm. Toxicol.) has left 
UNO to join the Medical College of 
Ohio faculty. 

DR. MARIO PEREZ-REYES (Psychia- 
try) is to administer a $149,000 
three-year grant from the National 
Institute of Mental Health for re- 
search on sympathetic and neuro- 
endocrine functions in depression. 
He has also been awarded $1,250 
from the Anna-Monika Foundation, 
a West German organization, to help 
support his research in the neuro- 
physiological and neuroendocrinol- 
ogical aspects of mental depression. 

DR. WILLIAM H. BARNWELL II was 
a fellow in the Department of Medi- 



cine prior to his appointment as 
instructor. Born in South Carolina, 
he graduated from Furman Univer- 
sity and the Medical College of 
South Carolina. After 13 years in 
private practice he returned to his 
alma mater for a residency in medi- 
cine. 



DR. C. NORMAN SMYTH of the Uni- 
versity College Hospital and the 
Obstetrics Hospital in London, 
visited the school on August 6, in- 
vited by the Department of Obstet- 
rics and Gynecology. He showed a 
film on "Perinatal Care" and dis- 
cussed the utilization of auditory 
stimuli in prognosticating fetal sur- 
vival. 

DRS. JOHN B. MADDEN, WILLIAM 
0. TRIER and CHARLES F. ZUKO- 
SKI resigned their positions in the 
Department of Surgery to join the 
faculty of the University of Arizona. 
Dr. Madden, though, remained as 
a clinical assistant professor until 
July 31, 1970. 

DR. RICHARD SCOTT BEAR, who 
has joined the faculty as professor 
of anatomy, was teaching at Boston 
University prior to his coming to 
UNC. A native of Ohio, he is a 
graduate of Princeton University 
and holds a Ph.D. degree from the 
University of California at Berkeley. 
He taught for 16 years at Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, 
was dean of Sciences and Humani- 
ties at Iowa State College for four, 
and served as dean of the Graduate 
School at Boston University for five. 

DR. WILLIAM P. HOOD, JR. (Medi- 
cine) spoke on "Dynamics of hyper- 
trophy in the left ventricular wall 
of man" at the Symposium on Car- 
diac Hypertrophy sponsored by the 
American Heart Association in Burl- 
ington, Vermont (August 8) and on 
"Left ventricular volum.e: physio- 
logic and clinical implications" at 
the Department of Medicine of the 
Medical College of South Carolina 
(October 21). 

On November 14, Dr. Hood pre- 
sented his and DR. ELLIS L ROL- 
LETT's (Medicine) findings on the 
patterns of contraction in the hu- 



man left ventricle at the Annual 
Scientific Session of the American 
Heart Association (Dallas). Dr. Roi- 
lett, though, has taken a year's leave 
of absence to do research at Duke 
University. 

MR. JAMES W. ANDERSON has re- 
ceived joint appointments as in- 
structor in hospital administration 
and director of the Private Patient 
Service at NCMH. A graduate of 
the University of Miami, he had 
been assistant administrator to the 
director of financial operations at 
Duke University Medical Center 
since 1967. 



DR. JAN J. HERMANS (Biochemis- 
try) is to direct a two-year grant of 
$44,000 received from the National 
Science Foundation for research on 
theoretical aspects of protein struc- 
ture. 

DR. SILAS B. COLEY, JR. ('65) has 
been named instructor in psychi- 
atry. A native of Raleigh, he grad- 
uated from the University of Miami 
and UNC. He served his residency 
at NCMH. 

Work by DRS. RICHARD L GLASS- 
ER and WALTER M. ST. JOHN 
(Physiology) on "Respiratory 
rhythm-making function of the 
pneumotoxic center" was presented 
at the American Institute of Biologi- 
cal Sciences in Burlington, Vermont 
(August 17-22). 

DR. ESZTER B. KOKAS (Physiology) 

attended the meetings of the Ameri- 
can Physiological Society (Davis, 
Calif.) and gave a paper on "Gas- 
tric secretion inhibition in chickens" 
resuming studies carried out by her 
and MR. WILLIAM D. BRUNSON, 
JR. (Sch. Dentistry '71). 



MISS E. SHEPLEY NOURSE has 
joined the staff of the Division of 
Health Affairs as assistant director 
of Continuing Education in charge 
of publication services. She is to 
assist in the preparation of confer- 
ences and in the publication of 
materials related to them. She will 
also be available for consultation 



27 



from faculty members on matters 
pertaining to both scientific and 
non-scientific publications. 



DR. DONALD E. McMILLAN, ap- 
pointed assistant professor of phar- 
macology, joined our faculty after 
three years of teaching at Down- 
state Medical Center, State Univer- 
sity of New York. Born in Pennsyl- 
vania, he graduated from Grove City 
College and the University of Pitts- 
burgh (M.S. and Ph.D.). 



DR. RALPH PENNIAL (Biochemis- 
try) is the principal investigator on 
a $35,000 grant from the National 
Science Foundation to carry on re- 
search which may provide clues to 
the origin of life by supporting the 
theory that some parts of the cell 
are remnants of an earlier evolu- 
tionary stage. Dr. Penniall is to 
direct the two-year project involv- 
ing the study of the synthesis of 
cytochrome oxidase, a cellular en- 
zyme. 



As guest of the Department of 
Radiology, DR. RICHARD C. WIT- 
COFSKI, from Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine, spoke on "Instrumen- 
tation in radioisotope scanners" 
(August 27). 



DR. F. X. CALVIN KNOBELOCH, ap- 
pointed professor of pediatrics, is 
a native of Indiana who graduated 
from Indiana University and holds 
a Ph.D. degree from the University 
of Florida. He has taught at the 
University of Mississippi, Indiana 
University, Wake Forest University, 
UNC-Greensboro and North Caro- 
lina College. 



At the annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Sociological Association (San 
Francisco, September 1-2) DR. 
BETTY E. COGSWELL (Prev. IVIedi- 
cine) presented two papers and 
chaired the session on "Cross- 
Cultural Family Research." The 
papers were entitled "Organization- 
al efforts to link adolescents to a 
sex information program" (DR. 
CHARLES B. ARNOLD, co-author) 
and "Modernization and socializa- 
tion systems." 



Dr. Cogswell spoke to the N. C. 
Family Life Council (Goldsboro, 
October 3) on "Socialization for the 
seventies" and to the participants 
of the Merrill-Palmer Institute Fam- 
ily and Society Conference (Detroit, 
November 20) on "What parents owe 
their children— myths about social- 
ization." 



DR. HUGH M. SHINGLETON (Obst. 
& GynecoL) resigned to become a 
member of the faculty at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama Medical Center. 



DR. KANUO AZUMI joined the re- 
search staff of the Department of 
Psychiatry during the summer. He 
came to the Hill from Stanford 
Medical School and is currently 
carrying out studies on the effect 
of ethanol and alcoholic beverages 
on sleep and on the relationship 
between galvanic skin response and 
sleep course. 



MR. J. OBIE HARMON (UNC '24) of 
Raleigh, has established a $10,500 
fund for the Health Science Library 
in memory of his wife, Sadie Jenk- 
ins Harmon. Mrs. Harmon also at- 
tended UNC, receiving both M.A. 
and Ph.D. degrees. 

DR. DONALD D. WEIR (Medicine & 
Prev. IVIedicine) is on leave this 
academic year. He is organizing 
the rehabilitation center at the Uni- 
versity of Iowa and St. Luke's Hos- 
pital and is to return to UNC next 
August. 

MR. WILLIAM L IVEY, associate 
professor of hospital administration 
and former director of NCMH, re- 
signed on August 31 to accept a 
position with the Arizona Regional 
Medical Program. 

DR. JOSEPH J. ALLEN ('57), ap- 
pointed instructor in psychiatry, is 
a tar heel who holds B.S. and M.D. 
degrees from UNC. He served as 
a medical officer in the U.S. Navy 
for three years and was in private 
practice in Warrenton, N. C. for five 
more before returning to NCMH in 
1965 for a psychiatry residency. 



On August 29 DR. J. WILBERT ED- 
GERTON (Psychiatry) participated 
in a symposium on "Evaluating the 
Program of Psychiatric Consultation 
to the General Practitioner" held 
in Wrightsville Beach, and on Sep- 
tember 18 was a panel member and 
discussant on "The Role of the 
Nurse in Mental Health Programs" 
(N. C. Public Health Association 
Annual Meeting, Asheville). During 
the fall he chaired two other sym- 
posia: one on "Current Problems in 
Legislation" (American Psychologi- 
cal Association Annual Convention, 
Washington, D. C.) and another on 
"Training the Mental Health Work- 
er for the 1980's" (American Public 
Health Association Annual Meeting, 
Philadelphia). DR. WILLIAM G. 
HOLLISTER (Psychiatry) was a 
panel member of the latter. At this 
last meeting. Dr. Edgerton present- 
ed a paper on "Demographic fac- 
tors and responses to stress among 
rural people" co-authored by DPS. 
HOLLISTER and WILLARD K. 
BENTZ (Psychiatry). 

Dr. Edgerton spoke on "Communi- 
cation in the helping relationship" 
to the staff of Guilford County De- 
partments of Health and Mental 
Health, (Greensboro, September 8) 
and to the supervisors and directors 
of instruction of the N. C. Educa- 
tion Association (Elizabeth City, 
October 10). 



MR. GEORGE F. HAMILTON (Psys. 
Therapy) resigned on August 31 to 
accept a position at East Carolina 
University. 




Physicians and theologians from 
throughout the Southeast assem- 
bled at the Hill in September for a 
two-day symposium entitled "Dia- 



28 



logue and Dilemmar Medicine and 
Religion." The program — the sec- 
ond of its kind held here and 
organized by the Office of Continua- 
tion Education — was co-spon- 
sored by the Committee on Medi- 
cine and Religion of the Medical 
Society of the State of North Caro- 
lina (MSSNC), the Department of 
Medicine and Religion of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association and the 
School of Medicine. CHAPLAIN 
FRED W. REID, JR. presided at the 
opening session where DEAN ISAAC 
M. TAYLOR welcomed the partici- 
pants and DR. JACK W. WILKER- 
SON, chairman of MSSNC's Com- 
mittee on Medicine and Religion, 
made the pertinent introductory re- 
marks. 

The symposium was divided into 
three main areas: "Life, Death and 
The Days Between." Speakers in 
the "Life" session included REV. 
DR. PAUL B. McCLEAVE, director 
of AMA's Department of Medicine 
and Religion; DR. RICHARD T. 
MYERS, chairman of the Depart- 
of Surgery, Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine; and DR. PAUL S. 
RHOADS, professor emeritus at 
Northwestern University Medical 
School and chairman of the Board 
of Governors of the Institute of 
Medicine of Chicago and of AMA's 
Department of Medicine and Relig- 
ion. DR. W. WYAN WASHBURN, 
member of MSSNC's Committee on 
Medicine and Religion, presided at 
the session. 

Speaking on "Death" were: REV. 
DR. ROBERT L NEWTON, associate 
professor of religion and dean of 
the chapel, Campbell College; REV. 
DR. GRANGER E. WESTBERG, pro- 
fessor, Wittenburg University Ham- 
ma School of Theology; and REV. 
THOMAS J. O'DONNELL, consultant 
to the Committee on Medicine and 
Religion. Dr. Wilkerson presided. 

"The Days Between" were discussed 
by MRS. ETHEL M. NASH (Obst. & 
Gyn.); DR. FRANK J. AYD, psychia- 
trist and editor of The Medical- 
Moral Newsletter; MR. RONALD J. 
GROGNET, coordinator. Drug Addic- 
tion Program at St. Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital and Drug Central of Metropoli- 
tan Washington; and DR. H. DOUG- 
LAS SESSOMS, professor of recrea- 
tion administration, UNC School of 



Education. REV. ORION N. HUTCH- 
INSON, JR., consultant to the Com- 
mittee on Medicine and Religion, 
presided in the morning; DR. WIL- 
LIAM R. RICHARDSON (Prev. Medi- 
cine) in the afternoon. 

After the first and last sessions, 
panel discussions were held with 
the participation of the session 
speakers, REV. O'DONNELL and 
RABBI HOWARD RABINOWITZ, di- 
rector, B'nai B'rith, Hillel Founda- 
tion of N. C. and consultant to the 
Committee on Medicine and Relig- 
ion. The specific topics considered 
at the symposium ranged from 
organ transplantation, counseling 
the dying, and sex and life relation- 
ships to the youth revolution and 
drugs. 

In September, the Class of 1963 
announced the establishment of the 
Mrs. Bruce F. Caldwell Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Mrs. Caldwell 
was the wife of Dr. Bruce F. Cald- 
well {'63) of Clinton, N. C. 

The scholarship will be awarded 
annually to a married student at the 
school on the basis of need. Pres- 
ent plans are for a $500 award, but 
if available funds increase, the 
amount may become larger. 

DR. JACK C. CHILDERS has been 
promoted from chief resident and 
part-time instructor, to instructor in 
the Department of Surgery. A tar 
heel, he is a graduate of Princeton 
(B.A.) and Columbia (M.D.) univer- 
sities. 



DR. DAVID A. DAVIS has resigned 
his full time professorship, yet re- 
mains as a clinical professor in the 
Department of Anesthesiology. 

DR. DONALD L MADISON has been 
appointed assistant professor of 
preventive medicine and research 
associate in the Health Service Re- 
search Center. A native of Nebras- 
ka, he is a graduate of La Sierra 
College (Calif.) and holds the M.D. 
degree from Loma Linda Univer- 
sity (Calif.). 



The 85 members of the class of 
1973 were selected from 1185 appli- 
cants. They represent 31 colleges, 
the main providers being UNC, 
Duke U., NC State U. and Davidson. 
Fifty-one of the students hold B.A. 
degrees; 32, B.S. degrees; two will 
obtain their B.S. degree in medicine 
upon completion of their first year 
in our school. Twenty-three are 
married. Seven are women. 

Three entering students were se- 
lected to receive the coveted More- 
head Fellowship in Medicine: MR. 
DAVID ALAN GRIMES of Greens- 
boro (Harvard), MR. DALE ALAN 
NEWTON of Raleigh (NC State) and 
MR. JAMES WILLARD STRATTON of 
Charlotte (Wooster). Morehead 
Medical Fellows are selected by a 
special committee from a slate of 
candidates recommended by the 
Committee on Admissions. Chosen 
on the basis of scholastic ability 
and achievement, personal quali- 
fications, motivation towards medi- 
cine and promise of distinction in 




Morehead scholars Newton, Grimes and Stratton. 



29 



the profession, they receive from 
the John Motley Morehead Founda- 
tion $10,000, plus tuition and fees, 
to cover expenses during the four 
years of medical school. 

DR. J. MARSHALL STARK— immu- 
nologist, traveling fellow of the 
Medical Research Council of Great 
Britain, and lecturer in bacteriology 
at the University of Glasgow— is at 
the Hill this year continuing his 
studies on the mode of action of 
immunological adjuvants in collab- 
oration with DR. JOHN K. SPITZ- 
NAGEL (Bacteriology). Dr. Stark is 
a native of Glasgow and received 
the M.D. degree there in 1948. 

$12,000 has been granted to the 
school by the National Science 
Foundation to support DRS. MAR- 
SHALL H. EDGELL and CLYDE A. 
HUTCHINSON'S (Bacteriology) re- 
search on the structure of bacterio- 
phage PHI X 174. Dr. Edgell is to 
direct the program which is part of 
a larger three-year project funded 
by NIH (each investigator has re- 
ceived about $40,000 from NIH for 
the first year of research). 

DR. ROBERT D. CROOM III, chief 
resident in surgery, was selected 
as the first recipient of the Nathan 
A. Womack Fellowship in Surgery. 




This fellowship, awarded on an an- 
nual basis to a member of the sur- 
gical house staff, was created by 
friends, associates and students of 
Dr. Womack in recognition of his 
leadership in surgery and medical 
education. 

Dr. Womack, who was the first chair- 
man of the Department of Surgery, 
is a Kenan professor and chairman 
emeritus of the department. 



On September 12, DR. W. PAUL 
GLEZEN (Pediatrics) talked to the 
staff of the Mary Imogene Bassett 
Hospital in Cooperstown, N. Y. on 
"Epidemiologic patterns of impor- 
tant respiratory pathogens in chil- 
dren." In mid October, he attended 
the International Working Confer- 
ence on Hong Kong Influenza at the 
National Communicable Disease 
Center in Atlanta, where he spoke 
on "Field evaluation of inactivated 
zonal centrifuged influenza vac- 
cines in children." 



DR. JOHN REINHART, director of 
the Psychiatric Clinic at Children's 
Hospital of Pittsburgh visited the 
Hill as guest of the Department of 
Psychiatry and lectured on "Pedi- 
atric liaison" (September 18) and 
"Aspects of psychosomatic illness 
in children" (September 19). 

DR. CAMPBELL W. McMILLAN 
(Pediatrics) spent two days (Sep- 
tember 22-23) at the Charlotte Me- 
morial Hospital as a visiting pro- 
fessor. 



"Genes of Mice and Men," the 1969 
Medical Science Lecture Series was 
organized by a committee chaired 
by DR. H. NEIL KIRKMAN (Pedi- 
atrics) and composed of ASSOCI- 
ATE DEAN JOHN B. GRAHAM 
(Pathology), DRS. ROBERT C. EL- 
STON (Pathology & Sch. Public 
Health), ROBERT A. GOYER (Pathol- 
ogy), GEOFFREY HAUGHTON (Bac- 
teriology), WILLIAM S. POLLITZER 
(Anatomy) and MAURICE WHIT- 
TINGHILL (Zoology). The lectures, 
delivered on Saturday mornings 
from September 20 to November 
22, brought to our school: 

DR. JAMES F. CROW, professor and 
chairman. Department of Medical 
Genetics, University of Wisconsin 
("Nearly neutral genes and their 
role in evolution"). 

DR. MARGARET C. GREEN, senior 
staff scientist, The Jackson Labora- 
tory, Bar Harbor, Maine ("Recent 
advances in mouse genetics"). 

DR. MARGERY W. SHAW, associate 
professor of biology, M. D. Ander- 
son Hospital and Tumor Institute 
and the University of Texas ("Elec- 




tron microscopy of human chromo- 
somes"). 

DR. GEORGE KLEIN, professor of 
tumor biology, Karolinska Institutet, 




Stockholm, Sweden ("Somatic vari- 
ation in tumor cell populations"). 

DR. BERT N. LA DU, professor and 
chairman. Department of Pharma- 




cology, New York University ("He- 
reditary responses to drugs"). 

DR. C. C. LI, professor of biometry, 
Graduate School of Public Health, 
University of Pittsburgh ("Medical 
sciences and natural selection"). 

DR. WALTER M. FITCH, associate 
professor of physiological chemis- 
try. University of Wisconsin ("Gen- 
etic processes in the evolution of 
amino acid sequences"). 



30 



DR. LENARD A. HERZENBERG, pro- 
fessor of genetics, Stanford Univer- 




sity ("Gene control of immunoglob- 
ulins"). 

DR. KURT SCHLESINGER, associ- 
ate professor of psychology, Uni- 




versity of Colorado ("The inherit- 
ance of behavior"). 

DR. ARNO G. MOTULSKY, profes- 
sor of medicine and genetics, Uni- 
versity of Washington ("Genetics 
and the future of medicine"). 



VICE CHANCELLOR C. ARDEN MIL- 
LER and DR. LESTER BRESLOW, of 
the University of California in Los 
Angeles, are co-directors of a na- 
tionwide effort to review "Consum- 
er health problems" (medical serv- 
ice from the patient's point of view). 
The Miller-Breslow board will con- 
duct hearings during 18 months to 
learn about health problems from 
community leaders, health service 
personnel and other interested 
groups. 



DR. WILLIAM VALENTINE, profes- 
sor and chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Medicine, UCLA, spoke at 
the combined staff conference on 
September 24, on "Red cell metabo- 



lism in hereditary hemolytic anem- 
ias." 

Organized by the Office of Continua- 
tion Education, postgraduate 
courses in medicine were conducted 
in Waynesville (September 16- 
October 28) and Morganton (Sep- 
tember 17-October 29). Among the 
lecturers were faculty members 
DRS. CAMPBELL W. McMILLAN 
(Pediatrics), WILLIAM B. WOOD 
(Medicine), GEORGE JOHNSON 
(Surgery) and JOSEPH J. ALLEN 
(Psychiatry). 

DR. JOHN M. WELLS, JR., instruc- 
tor in physiology since September, 
was until the summer a research 
assistant at the Scripps Institution 
of Oceanography (La Jolla, Calif.). 
Born in Virginia, he holds degrees 
from Randolph-Macon College (B.S.) 
and the University of California 
(Ph.D.). 

Psychiatrist DR. ROBERT B. DUKE 
has left Chapel Hill to accept a 
position at N. C. State University. 

DR. ARTHUR J. PRANGE, JR. (Psy- 
chiatry) returned in August from a 
year's research leave in England. 
While in Europe, he worked with 
the Neuropsychiatric Unit of the 
Medical Research Council in Car- 
shalton and Epsom (Surrey, Eng- 
land). He also visited psychiatric 
research facilities in Edinburgh, 
London, Munich, Basel and Milan. 
On September 17 he visited the 
Cherry Hospital in Goldsboro and 
shared with the staff his views on 
the approach to research in depres- 
sion. 



In late September, DR. COLIN G. 
THOMAS, JR. (Surgery) attended 
the meetings of the International 
Society of Surgeons in Buenos Aires, 
delivering a paper on "A compara- 
tive study of choledochoenterostomy 
and transduodenal sphincterotomy 
in the management of benign extra- 
hepatic biliary tract obstruction." 

Dr. Thomas and DR. A GRISWOLD 
BEVIN (Surgery) participated in the 
meetings of the American College 
of Surgeons held in San Francisco 



in October. Dr. Thomas reported on 
investigations carried out by him, 
DR. ANDREW DAVIDSON ('69) and 
MRS. JUDY OWENS (Surgery) on 
the effect of surgical trauma on 
DMBA induced breast cancer in the 
Sprague-Dawley rat. Dr. Beven 
spoke about work done by him and 
DR. JOHN W. MADDEN (now of V.A. 
Hospital and U. Arizona) on local- 
ization of collagen synthesis in heal- 
ing wounds. 

On December 7, Dr. Thomas ad- 
dressed the Southern Surgical As- 
sociation (Homestead, Va.) on "In- 
dications for and results of posterior 
sphincterotomy in the management 
of Hirschsprung's disease" and on 
the 13th of the same month, he 
spoke to the surgical staff of Moses 
H. Cone Memorial Hospital on 
"Management of goiter." 

DR. JAMES E. ETHERIDGE, JR. 
(Pediatrics & IVIedicine) resigned 
his position here and is currently 
at the Mayo Clinic. 

Hosted by the Department of Phys- 
iology, DRS. ZEHAVA GOTTSFELD 
(McGill University, Montreal), 
FRANK P. BROOKS (University of 
Pennsylvania Medical Clinic, Phila- 
delphia), MOGENS KAMPP and 
AARON P. SANDERS (Duke Univer- 
sity Medical Center) presented 
reminars here during the fall semes- 
ter. Their respective topics were: 
"Some biochemical and physiologi- 
cal aspects of GABA (gamma amino 
butyric acid)" (September 25), "The 
Neurohumoral control of digestive 
secretions" (October 17), "Studies 
on the regulation of transcapillary 
filtration transport" (November 20), 
and "Hyperbaric oxygen, convul- 
sions and cerebral energetics" 
(December 18). 

DR. ALBERT R. KRALL, who was an 
associate professor of biochemistry 
in the Department of Psychiatry, is 
now at the Medical College of South 
Carolina. 

Former assistant professor at Toron- 
to General Hospital, DR. GEORGE 
D. BLENKARN, has joined the De- 
partment of Surgery with the same 
rank. Born in Toronto, he won his 



31 



M.D. degree from the university of 
that city. 




William D. Kassens (71) with Prof. Alex 
Turnbull in Cardiff where Bill served an 
Ob.-Gyn. clerkship during the fall at the 
Welsh National School of Medicine. 



PROF. GEORGE KLEIN from the De- 
partment of Tumor Biology of the 
Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm) 
visited the school by invitation of 
the Department of Bacteriology and 
the Genetics Curriculum. On Sep- 
tember 26, Prof. Klein lectured on 
''Somatic variation in tumor cell 
population studied by antigenic 
markers." 

On the same day, DPS. NATHANIEL 
F. RODMAN and REGINALD G. 
MASON (Pathology) gave a seminar 
on "A search for materials compati- 
ble with blood" at Columbia Uni- 
versity as part of that institution's 
program on biomaterials. 

DR. RALPH SPENCER has been 
named visiting assistant professor 
of radiology for the current academ- 
ic year. A native of England, he 
holds three degrees from Man- 
Chester University. He has been a 
professor at Liverpool University 
since 1958 and is a fellow of the 
Royal College of Surgeons. 

"Confirmation of inborn errors of 
metabolism, and identification of 
the carrier state" was the title of 
DR. KARL H. BLAU's (Biochemistry) 
presentation at the Department of 



Chemistry of the Medical College 
of South Carolina (September 29). 

DR. CLAYTON E. WHEELER (Medi- 
cine) attended the meeting of the 
Subcommittee on Venereal Diseases 
of the Cutaneous Commission of 
the Armed Forces Epidemiological 
Board at the National Communica- 
ble Disease Center in Atlanta (Sep- 
tember 25) and the meeting of the 
Cutaneous Commission at Walter 
Reed Army Medical Center in Wash- 
ington, D. C. (November 24-25). On 
October 23, Dr. Wheeler delivered 
a paper entitled "Dermatologic as- 
pects of viral disease" at the assem- 
bly of the North Carolina Academy 
of General Practice, in Durham. 

DR. PHILIP SANDBLOM, professor 
and chairman of the Department of 
Surgery at the University of Lund 
(Sweden) since 1950, was the first 
Hunter J. Sweaney visiting lecturer 
in surgery. The lectureship was 
established in 1968 by the late DR. 
HUNTER M. SWEANEY ('17) and 
his family. Students, surgical house 
staff and faculty had the opportun- 
ity to have a personal contact with 
Prof. Sandblom during his stay in 
our school (September 28-October 
4). Prof. Sandblom gave three for- 
mal presentations: "Wound heal- 
ing," "Problems of patients with 
inoperable cancer" and "Hemobil- 
ia." 

Through the years Dr. Sweaney, 
who died shortly after establishing 



the lectureship, had donated part 
of his medical library to the school. 
In his will he bequested the re- 
mainder of his collection to our 
library. 

Two visiting ophthalmologists lec- 
tured to staff and students on Octo- 
ber 2. DR. DONALD JOHNSON 
LYLE, retired professor and chair- 
man of the Department of Ophthal- 
mology of the University of Cincin- 
nati, spoke on "Wegener's granulo- 
matosis" and DR. ALAN J. MOON- 
EY from Dublin, on "Diabetic reti- 
nopathy." 

The North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Tennessee and Kentucky branches 
of the American Society for Micro- 
biology met in Asheville on Octo- 
ber 3-4. Several members of our 
faculty attended the meetings, and 
DPS. HARRY GOODER and ROBERT 
TWAROG (Bacteriology) presented 
papers on "Autolysis of pneumococ- 
cal cell walls" and "Regulation of 
the tryptophan biosynthetic en- 
zymes in acinetobacter," respect- 
ively. Dr. Gooder's co-worker in this 
specific research was graduate stu- 
dent MR. LARRY V. HOWARD. 

DR. ORLANDO GABRIELE (Radiol- 
ogy) attended an international con- 
gress of radiology held in Tokyo 
during the first week in October. 

DR. MICHAEL P. REMLER, recently 
appointed assistant professor of 




Drs. Thomas and Sandblom. 



32 



medicine and anatomy, was born 
in New York and is a graduate of 
Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy and Tufts University School of 
Medicine. He was a neurology resi- 
dent and a fellow at Stanford Uni- 
versity (1966-68) and Harvard Medi- 
cal School (1968-69), 



HEW has awarded a $16,427 grant 
to the school for continuation of 
research on "Mechanisms of Endo- 
toxin Action" under the direction of 
DR. JOHN C. HERION (Medicine). 



On October 8, DR. WILLIAM B. 
RADCLIFFE (Radiology) spoke to 
the staff of Danville Memorial Hos- 
pital on the radiology of stroke. 



DR. ISAAC M. TAYLOR has been 
reappointed for a second five-year 
term as dean of the school and DR. 
WILLIAM J. CROMARTIE (Bacteriol- 
ogy) has been made associate dean 
for clinical sciences and chief of 
staff of NCMH, succeeding DR. 
CHRISTOPHER C. FORDHAM. 

A specialist in infectious diseases, 
Dr. Cromartie received the M.D. de- 
gree from Emory University in 1937 
and is a diplomate of both the 
American Board of Pathology (1948) 
and the American Board of Internal 
Medicine (1951). He came to Chapel 
Hill in 1951 as an associate profes- 
sor of bacteriology and medicine 
and was promoted to professor in 
1959. 



Dr. Cromartie has been an active 
member of state and national bac- 
teriology and microbiology organi- 
zations and has served on numerous 
committees of the School of Medi- 
cine. Since 1967 he has been direc- 
tor of Curriculum Studies. 



As participant in Project Cardiac 
Case — A National Conference on 
Coronary Heart Disease (Pensacola, 
October 10) DR. ERNEST CRAIGE 
(Medicine) spoke on "Physical signs 
in coronary heart disease." 

A month later. Dr. Craige presented 
a paper on "Impaired function of 
cloth-covered Starr-Edwards mi- 
tral valve prosthesis: Detection by 
phonocardiography" at the annual 
joint meetings of the Laennec So- 
ciety and the American Heart Asso- 
ciation (Dallas, November 12). 



DR. FRANK C. WILSON (Surgery) 
participated in the meetings of the 
N. C. Orthopaedic Association (Ashe- 
ville, October 11) and reported on 
studies carried out by him and DR. 
JAMES D. HUNDLEY (Surgery) on 
"Engelmann's disease." 

At the same meetings, DR. EDWIN 
T. PRESTON (Surgery) presented 
"A study of some of the physical 
and histological aspects of tendon 
healing in the dog" (October 10). 
Next day. Dr. Preston reviewed the 
rehabilitation program at NCMH to 
the School of Medicine Co-Found- 
ers Club. 




"Mind: The software of the brain" 
was the title of a paper presented 
by DR. NORMAN A. COULTER, JR. 
(Surgery) at the third annual sym- 
posium of the American Society of 
Cybernetics, held on October 14 at 
Gaithersburg, Md. 

DR. ROBERT H. WAGNER (Pathol- 
ogy & Biochemistry) received the 
Dr. Murray Thelin Award given by 




Dean Taylor and Associate Dean Cromartie. 



the National Hemophilia Founda- 
tion. The presentation took place at 
a Foundation board of trustees 
awards dinner (Chicago, October 11) 
and was made jointly by NHF Pres- 
ident JAMES C. CUNNINGHAM and 
DR. K. M. BRINKHOUS (Pathology), 
chairman of the organization's Medi- 
cal Advisory Council. 

The award was established in mem- 
ory of Dr. Murray Thelin, a 1960 
UNC graduate who received his 
Ph.D. in Biochemistry under Dr. 
Wagner's advisorship. Dr. Thelin, 
himself a severely affected hemo- 
philiac, was a researcher at Hyland 
Laboratories in Los Angeles, but 
worked closely with Dr. Wagner and 
other members of our Department 
of Pathology in developing a plasma 
concentrate for the aid of hemo- 
philiacs. The award, which reads 
"For outstanding achievements 
which have contributed greatly to 
the health, comfort and hope of 
hemophiliacs" was given to Dr. 
Wagner for his studies in the isola- 
tion of a trace material, antihemo- 
philic factor from blood plasma. 
These studies have lead to the 
commercial production of two dif- 
ferent preparations of antihemo- 
philic factor used in treating hemo- 
philic patients. 

On October 17-20, Dr. Wagner, to- 
gether with Dr. Brinkhous, DR. 



33 



NATHANIEL F. RODMAN and MISS 
SILVIA HINNOM (Pathology) at- 
tended the International Commit- 
tee on Haemostasis and Thrombosis 
held in Bath, England. 

DR. JERRY A. SMITH ('63) has re- 
turned to the Hill as instructor in 
pharmacology-toxicology and pedi- 
atrics. Born and educated in North 
Carolina (UNC: B.S., M.D.) he was 
a Peace Corps physician in 1968-69. 

In October, DR. ROBERT SMITH 
(Prev. Medicine & Medicine) was 

named acting director of the Divi- 
sion of Research and Education in 
Community Medical Care succeed- 
ing dean emeritus W. Reece Berry- 
hill who held the post since 1966. 

ASSOCIATE DEAN JOHN B. GRA- 
HAM (Pathology) was a participant 
in the annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Society of Human Genetics in 
San Francisco in early October. He 
presented a paper co-authored by 
DR. EMILY S. BARROW (Pathology) 
on " 'Unmasking' of plasma anti- 
hemophilic activity in hemophilic 
plasma by succinic anhydride." 

On December 7, Dr. Graham took 
part in the American Society of 
Hematology education program de- 
signed to familiarize hematologists 
with genetic concepts and their 
clinical applications (Cleveland). 
He spoke on the genetics of coagu- 
lation. 



DR. JEAN LEON GUERIGUIAN, an 
instructor in pharmacology since 
October, comes to the school from 
the French Institute for Medical Re- 
search in Paris. Born in Alexandria, 
Egypt, he holds both the B.S. and 
M.D. degrees from the University 
of Paris. 



The Department of Bacteriology pre- 
sented two visiting lecturers during 
October. DR. W. W. JOKLIK, from 
the Department of Microbiology at 
Duke University Medical Center, 
spoke on "Virus replication" on Oc- 
tober 15. On the 23rd, DR. HILARY 
KOPROWSKI, director of The Wis- 
tar Institute in Philadelphia, lec- 
tured on "Koch's postulates 1969." 



DRS. MORRIS A. LIPTON and 
ARTHUR J. PRANGE, JR. (Psychia- 
try) attended the Chicago meetings 
of the Psychiatric Research Society 
(October 16-17) where Dr. Prange 
reported studies carried out by them 
and DR. IAN C. WILSON (Psychiatry) 
on "Hormone enhancement of thy- 
moleptic substances: Suggestions 
for a synaptic theory of affective 
disorders." 



DR. HUBERT C. PATTERSON (Surg- 
ery) retired as president of the N. C. 
Surgical Association during the 
meetings held by this organization 
at Mid Pines Club, N. C. on Octo- 
ber 16-19. 



DR. GERALD A. GILDERSLEEVE, 
radiologist at Winchester Memorial 
Hospital (Winchester) spoke on "X- 
ray evaluation of facial bone in- 
jury" on October 21. He was a guest 
of the Department of Radiology. 

DR. RALPH W. BRAUER, director of 
the Wrightsville Marine Bio-Medical 
Laboratory and professor of physiol- 
ogy and pharmacology at Duke Uni- 
versity has been appointed visiting 
professor of physiology. 

DRS. ERIC D. WITTKOWER and 
MICHAEL RUTTER were visiting 
lecturers at the Department of Psy- 
chiatry during October. Dr. Witt- 
kower (McGill University, Montreal) 
spoke on "Perspectives of trans- 
cultural psychiatry." Dr. Rutter 
(Maudsley Hospital, London) lec- 
tured on "Sex differences in chil- 
dren's responses to family stress" 
and "Psychiatric interviewing." 

DR. TOMMY B. GRIFFIN (Medicine) 
was a member of the guest fac- 
ulty participating in the Medical 
College of Virginia's Forty-first An- 
nual McGuire Lecture Series (Octo- 
ber 23-24). The title of this year's 
series was "Advances in Pathophy- 
siology and Therapy of Skin Di- 
sease" and it was the first time 
dermatologic medicine has been 
chosen as series topic. Dr. Griffin 
gave two lectures: "Anhidrotic syn- 
dromes" and "Practical manage- 
ment of sweat disorders." 



As part of the Department of Psy- 
chiatry's program on psychoanalyt- 
ic training, a number of visiting 
lecturers conducted seminars 
throughout the fall semester. DR. 
LEON ALTMAN, from the New York 
Psychoanalytic Society: "Dream 
seminar" (September 19-20, Octo- 
ber 31, November 1, December 5-6, 
January 9-10). DR. ROYDEN AST- 
LEY, professor of psychiatry and 
director of the Pittsburgh Psycho- 
analytic Institute: "Neurotic con- 
flict" (September 21), "Hysteria" 
(November 2) and "Obsessional 
neurosis" (December 7). DR. MONTE 
JOSEPH, from the Pittsburgh Psy- 
choanalytic Society: "Continuous 
case seminar" (September 21, No- 
vember 2, December 7, January 11). 
DR. GEORGE H. POLLOCK, director 
of research at The Institute for 
Psychoanalysis (Chicago): "Semi- 
nars on research in psychoanalysis" 
(October 18-19, November 22-23 and 
December 6-7). DR. R. N. ZABA- 
RENKO, from the Pittsburgh Psycho- 
analytical Society: "Psychosomatic 
disorder" (January 11). 

During the fall, MEDICAL EXAM- 
INER R. PAGE HUDSON (Pathol- 
ogy) spoke at the Fifth District 
Medical Society on "The medical 
examiner and civil issues" and con- 
ducted a seminar on "Gunshot 
Wounds" at the H. Moses Cone Me- 
morial Hospital. As a member of 
the medico-legal committee of the 
American Academy of Clinical Toxi- 
cologists, he participated in the 
organization's meeting held in Chi- 
cago on October 22-25. He also at- 
tended the Washington meeting of 
the Association of Clinical Scien- 
tists (November 7-9). 

DR. WILLIAM L FLEMING (Prev. 
Medicine) attended the annual 
meeting of the American Social 
Health Association (New York, Oc- 
tober 30-November 3). In his capac- 
ity of chairman of the association's 
Venereal Disease Advisory Commit- 
tee he presided over the commit- 
tee's sessions and participated in 
the meetings of the board and 
executive committee. Dr. Fleming 
also served as a discussion leader 
at a national conference on "The 
Risk-Taking Behavior of Youth" held 
as part of ASHA's annual reunion. 



34 



DR. W. GRADY THOMAS (Surgery), 
currently chairman of the North 
Carolina Chapter of the Acoustical 
Society of America, spoke on "Ef- 
fects of noise on health and hear- 
ing" at the Noise and Hearing Con- 
servation for Industry Seminar 
(Charlotte, October 31). He also 
attended the November 4-7 meet- 
ings of the Acoustical Society of 
America (San Diego) and together 
with MR. MACK J. PRESLAR (Surg- 
ery) conducted a short course on 
"Audiometric calibration" at the 
American Speech and Hearing Con- 
vention (Chicago, November 12). 

The Office of Continuation Educa- 
tion aired a new television series 
this fall. Produced by MR. DAVID 
L RANEY, director of Medical TV, 
MEDICAL REPORT was broadcast 
on UNC-TV network stations. Each 
program of the series was shown 
twice a week: 

"The Price of Illness"— DR. EDGAR 
T. BEDDINGFIELD, president. Medi- 
cal Society of the State of North 
Carolina; MR. J. ALEX McMAHON, 
president, N. C. Blue Cross-Blue 
Shield; and MR. WILLIAM LOW- 
RANCE, president, N. C. Hospital 
Association. 



"Training Ground for Doctors" — 
DEAN ISAAC M. TAYLOR. 

"Accident, Suicide or Murder?" — 
MEDICAL EXAMINER R. PAGE HUD- 
SON and DR. ARTHUR J. McBAY 
(Pathology) chief toxicologist, N. C. 
State Board of Health. 

"Battling the Flu Bug" — DRS. 
FLOYD W. DENNY and W. PAUL 
GLEZEN (Pediatrics). 

"Community Medicine — A New Em- 
phasis"— DRS. W. REECE BERRY- 
HILL (IVIedicine), ROBERT SMITH 
(Prev. IVIedicine & IVIedicine) and 
CARL B. LYLE (Medicine). 




"Heart Disease" 



"Are Family Doctors Outdated?"— 
DRS. LAWRENCE M. CUTCHIN 
(IVIedicine & Pediatrics), WILLIAM 

B. HERRING (Medicine) and JACK 
WILKERSON. 

"Modified Man"— DR. DAN DOBBS 
(Law Sch.) DR. STANLEY R. MAN- 
DEL (Surgery) and CHAPLAIN FRED 
W. REID. 

"Payoff on Cancer Research" — 
DRS. GERALD E. HANKS (Radiol- 
ogy), GEOFFREY HAUGHTON (Bac- 
teriology), CAMPBELL W. McMIL- 
LAN (Pediatrics) and JOHN C. 
PARKER (Medicine). 

"Heart Disease — It Can Be Pre- 
vented" — DR. ERNEST CRAIGE 
(Medicine). 

"A Regional Approach to Medicine" 
—DR. HUGH MATTHEWS, director 
of Health Affairs, Western Carolina 
University, and MR. WOODY HAMP- 
TON, chairman. Board of Trustees, 

C. J. Harris Community Hospital 
(Sylva, N. C). 

Mr. Raney interviewed the speakers. 



DR. WILLIAM P. RICHARDSON 
(Prev. Medicine) is the newly elect- 
ed president-elect of the American 




35 




CLASS 



BAUM, C. A. BEALE, E. F. BENTON, G R BERNARD, S. A. 




BILLICK, S BLACKMAN, J. BUTLER, W. CANNON, T, B. 




CATES, N M, CLARK, F S CLAYTON, M COLEMAN J B 
DAVIS, F, E. DEMPSEY, T EDWARDS, C ESTES J 




&R1FF:N, E. D. GRIMES, D. A GUILFORD, W HARLEY, J. C. 



Agsten, Joseph Edward (Hampden-Sydney) Raleigh, N. C. 

Bahnson, III, Frederic F. (UNC) Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Baker, Jr., Charles E. (Davidson) Greensboro, N. C. 

Banks, Kenneth (Livingstone) Edenton, N. C. 

Baum, Carl Alan (Harvard) Baltimore, Md. 

Beale, Ernest F., Jr. (UNC) Wilmington, N. C. 

Benton, III, George R. (N.C. State) Goldsboro, N.C. 

Bernard, Stephen Alan (Pennsylvania) High Point, N. C. 

Billick, Stephen Bates (Yale) Falls Church, Va. 

Blackman, Jesse Aycock (N.C. Wesleyan) Fremont, N. C. 

Butler, William M. (Duke) Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Cannon, Thomas Bernard (UNC) Greensboro, N. C. 

Gates, III, Nady M. (UNO Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Clark, III, Franklin S. C. (UNC) Fayetteville, N. C. 

Clayton, Melvin Louis (N.C. Coll.) Durham, N. C. 

Coleman, James Barr (UNC) Greenville, N. C. 

Davis, III, Frank E. (UNC) Grifton, N.C. 

Dempsey, Thomas Richard (UNC) Clinton, N.C. * 

Edw/ards, II, Charles H. (U. of Va.) Charlotte, N.C. 

Estes, Jr., John E. (UNC) Raleigh, N.C. 

Fahrner, William B. R. (UNC) Greenville, N. C. 

Federal, Jr., William A. (UNC) Charlotte, N. C. 

Ferguson, William R. (UNC) Waynesville, N. C. 

Finch, Jr., Robert E. (N.C. State) Raleigh, N.C. 

Forstner, James Robert (Princeton) Aiken, S.C. 

Franklin, Jr., Earl R. (Duke) Raleigh, N. C. 

Franklin, Walter Wayne (UNC) Greensboro, N. C. 

Fritz, Robert Leslie (Duke) Flemington, N. J. 

Gooden, Michael Dean (UNO Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Goodman, Jr., Donald B. (Davidson) Wadesboro, N. C. 

Goslen, III, Junius B. (Davidson) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Greene, Samuel Ira (U. of the South) Tryon, N. C. 

Griffin, Jr., Ezra D. (East Carolina) Greenville, N. C. 

Grimes, David Alan (Harvard) Greensboro, N.C. 

Guilford, William B. (UNC) Aurora, N.C. 

Harley, John Crittenden (N.C. State) Greensboro, N. C. 

Harper, John Michael (UNC) Hendersonville, N. C. 

Harry, Robert Roger (N.C. State) Charlotte, N. C. 

Hersh, Edward Gene (Kenyon) Durham, N. C. 

Jackson, Elizabeth H. (UNC) Morganton, N. C. 

Jackson, Francis Daniel (UNC) Morganton, N. C. 

Jennette, John Charles (UNC) New Bern, N. C. 

Wu, Geraldine Nada (GeorgiJI 



^ f ^ t 

SPIEGEL, T. M. SPRINKLE, R. V. STRATTON, J, W. SUCIU, T. I 




SUMMERLIN, D, C. 



36 



F 1973 



Johnson, Dennis R. (St. Joseph's) 
Jones, Colin Douglas (Illinois) 
Jordan, Stanley C. (UNO 
Kaufman, Steven H. (UNO 
Keller, Elisabeth A. (Tufts) 
Lentz, Terry Rae (UNC-G) 
Long, John Clayton (UNO 
Lovett, Michael Alan (Yale) 
Low, Richard C. (UNO 
Martin, Jr., James N. (Wake Forest) 
Maynard, James Lewis (N.C. State) 
Moore, John Franklin (M.I.T.) 
Newby, Venita Carol (Howard) 
Newsome, III, Henry C. (UNO 
Newton, Dale Alan (N.C. State) 
Niess, Gary Stewart (Dartmouth) 
Parham, Sumner Malone, Jr. (VMI) 
Patterson, David Read (UNO 
Pierce, Richard Norwin (Yale) 
Purvis, William Henry (UNO 
Reavis, Jr., Wilton M. (Davidson) 
Rhea, Karen Ann H. (King) 
Robinson, Michael F. (Ohio State) 
Rogers, Charles Stewart (Dartmouth) 
Ruff, Roy Leiand (Kenyon) 
Rule, William Stanley (UNO 
Shearin, Jr., Hugh G. (UNO 
Sherman, Susan Shapiro (UNO 
Sloop, Jr., Frank B. (UNO 
Smith, Stephen Wayne (UNO 
Spiegel, Timothy Merle (Duke) 
Sprinkle, Ronnie Vernon (UNO 
Stratton, James Willard (Wooster) 
Suciu, Thomas N. (Chapman) 
Summerlin, Jr., Daniel C. (Duke) 
Swaim, Jr., Lindian J. (UNO 
Tilt, Douglas Carroll (UNO 
Underwood, Jr., George H. (N.C. State) 
Wall, Michael Abraham (UNO 
Walther, Robert Raymond (Cornell) 
Whisnant, William H. (UNO 
Williamson, Joseph E. (Duke) 
thern) Boone, N. C. 



Statesville, N. C. 

Wilmington, DeL 

Sparta, N. C. 

Raleigh, N.C. 

Smithfield, N.C. 

Salisbury, N.C. 

Mebane, N.C. 

Winchester, Va. 

Houston, Tex. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

Raleigh, N.C. 

Laurinburg, N. C. 

Elizabeth City, N.C. 

Pilot Mountain, N.C. 

Henderson, N. C. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Henderson, N. C. 

Chapel Hill, N.C. 

Greenville, N.C. 

Bennett, N.C. 

Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Holladay, Tenn. 

Durham, N.C. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Park Ridge, N.J. 

Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

Asheville, N.C. 

Raleigh, N.C. 

Fletcher, N.C. 

Charlotte, N.C. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Madison, Wise. 

Mount Olive, N. C. 

Durham, N.C. 

Shelby, N.C. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Chapel Hill, N.C. 

Miami, Fla. 

SilerCity, N.C. 

Pinehurst, N.C. 



HARPER, J. M. HARRY, R. R. HERSH, E. G. JACKSON, E. H. 




JACKSON, F, D. JENKINS, E, E JENNETTE, J, C JOHNSON, D. R. 
JONES, C. D. JORDAN, 5. C, KAUFMAN, S H. KELLER, E. A. 




LENTZ, T. R. LONG, J. C. LOW, R. C. MARTIN, J N. 

MAYNARD, J. L. MOORE, J, F. NEWBY, V, C NEWSOME, H. C. 




NEWTON, D, A. NIESS, G- S. PARHAM, S. M. PATTERSON, D.R. 



PIERCE, R. N. PURVIS, W. H, REAVIS, W, M RHEA, K A H. 




©fT| 



^Q 



ROBINSON, M. F. ROGERS, C. S. RUFF, R. L. RULE, W. S. 



SHEARIN, H. G SHERMAN, S. S. SLOOP, F. B. SMITH, S W 



Iff ^ ^ t^ 



UNDERWOOD, G. H. 



WALTHER, R R. WH1SNANT,W.H. WILLIAMSON, J, E. 



37 



College of Preventive Medicine. He 
will assume office in the fall of 
1970. 

DR. MARGARET C. SWANTON (Pa- 
thology) was one of the six faculty 
members presenting a workshop on 
"Cytology of Gynecologic Malignan- 
cy" at the meeting of the American 
Society of Cytology (Chicago, No- 
vember 5-8). She was also modera- 
tor of the discussion group at the 
workshop on "Educational Proced- 
ures for Cytology" sponsored by 
ASC following the meeting (Novem- 
ber 9-10). 

The Southeastern Sectional Meet- 
ing of the American Chemical So- 
ciety (Richmond, November 6) was 
attended by DRS. GEORGE K. SUM- 
MER, KARL H. BLAU, FINIS CAV- 
ENDER, DIANNE MURPHY and MR. 
DAVID EDWARDS of the Biochem- 
istry Department. Dr. Summer also 
participated in the meetings of the 
Southern Society for Pediatric Re- 
search (Richmond, November 20-21) 
and presented a paper on "Treat- 
ment of eruptive xanthomata in von 
Gierke's disease." 

DR. ROBERT C. BROWN ('59) has 
rejoined the Department of Pathol- 
ogy as an associate professor. A 
native of North Carolina, he is a 
graduate of Erskine College and 
holds both the M.D. and the Ph.D. 
degrees from UNC. He served his 
residency and taught here from 
1962-54, was a captain in the Armed 
Forces Institute of Pathology (Wash- 
ington, D. C.) from 1964-66 and for 
the last three years was head experi- 
mental pathologist at the Cellular 
Pathology Group, Biology Division, 
of Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
(Oak Ridge). 

DR. HOWARD D. STOWE (Pathology) 
chaired the Nutrition Section of the 
symposium on Equine Pharmacol- 
ogy and Therapeutics held at Ohio 
State University under the sponsor- 
ship of HEW and FDA. Dr. Stowe 
also delivered a paper on "Basis 
and value of equine vitamin supple- 
ments." 

On November 6-8, DR. WILLIAM S. 
POLLITZER (Anatomy) attended the 



Fifth Princeton Conference on Popu- 
lation Genetics and Demography 
(Princeton). The topic of this year's 
conference was the genetic restruc- 
turing of human populations. 

On November 20-22, Dr. Pollitzer 
attended the annual meeting of the 
American Anthropological Associa- 
tion (New Orleans) and lectured on 
"Genetics and culture." 



The Department of Pharmacology 
sponsored seven seminars during 
the fall semester: 

"Early events in the response to 
parathyroid hormone," DR. JOHN 
A. PARSONS, senior member of the 
scientific staff of the British Medi- 
cal Research Council (London) and 
visiting lecturer at Harvard Medical 
School. 

"Penicillin hypersensitivity," DR. F. 
P. DOYLE, director of research at 
Beecham Research Laboratories 
(Betchworth, Surrey, England). 

"Antimetabolites in cancer chemo- 
therapy," DR. THOMAS C. HALL, 
director of the Division of Oncol- 
ogy, University of Rochester School 
of Medicine and Dentistry. 

"Intracellular localization of steroid 
hormones in target tissues," DR. 
WALTER E. STUMPF, assistant pro- 
fessor of pharmacology. University 
of Chicago Division of Biological 
Sciences. (Seminar co-sponsored 
by the Department of Anatomy and 
Laboratories for Reproductive Biol- 
ogy.) 

"Clinical pharmacology of preanes- 
thetic medication," DR. ARTHUR S. 
KEATS, professor and chairman. De- 
partment of Anesthesiology, Baylor 
College of Medicine. (Seminar co- 
sponsored by the Department of 
Pharmacology and the Neurobiology 
Program.) 

"The effect of omega-substituted 
fatty acid on beta-oxidation and 
gluconeogenesis," DR. KLAUS 
BRENDELL, associate professor of 
physiology and pharmacology, Duke 
University School of Medicine. 

"The estrogen dependent pyridine 
nucleotide transhydrogenases of 
human placenta," DR. LEWIS L 
ENGEL, professor of biological 
chemistry, Harvard Medical School. 



DR. JAMES H. SCATLIFF (Radiol- 
ogy) gave a paper on the radiologi- 
cal evaluation of renal infarction at 
the Southern Medical Association 
meeting (Atlanta, November 10-13). 
On November 13-14 he was a visit- 
ing lecturer at the University of 
Kentucky Medical Center where he 
spoke on (1) "Some X-ray observa- 
tions and current orthopedic pro- 
cedures," (2) "A radiological assess- 
ment of clinical and animal renal 
infarction" and (3) "Meningiomas: 
Notes from a neuroradiological 
scrapbook." 

DR. ISRAEL ROISENBERG from the 
University of Sao Paulo, visited the 
Department of Pathology and lec- 
tured on "A study of hemophilia in 
Rio Grande do Sul" on November 
11. 



DR. L MORGAN HALE (Ophthalmol- 
ogy) attended the meetings of the 
Southern Medical Association held 
in Atlanta, on November 11-12. He 
presented a paper entitled "Orbital 
mucormycosis." 




In September, DR. OSCAR L SAPP 
(Medicine) was appointed the Unit- 
ed States Army Medical Department 
liaison representative at the UNC 
School of Medicine by the Surgeon 
General of the United States Army. 
His certificate was presented by 
Col. Carlton W. Sargent, Third Unit- 
ed States Army Surgeon on Novem- 
ber 11. 



"Treatment of diabetic acidosis" 
was the topic discussed at the 
November 12 Combined Staff Con- 
ference by DR. PHILIP BONDY, 
professor and chairman of the De- 
partment of Medicine at Yale Uni- 
versity. 



38 



DRS. BENSON R. WILCOX and WIN- 
FRED L. SUGG (Surgery) took part 
in the meeting of the Southern 
Thoracic Society in Washington, 
D. C. (November 13-15). Dr. Wilcox 
spoke on "Changes in pulmonary 
vascular dynamics following clos- 
ure of atrial septal defects in hu- 
mans" and Dr. Suggs on "Cardiac 
assistance (counterpulsation) in ten 
patients: Clinical and hemodynamic 
observations." Dr. Suggs was also 
asked to initiate discussion of a 
paper on penetrating wounds of the 
thoracic aorta and great arteries 
presented by members of the surgi- 
cal faculty at Emory University 
medical school. 

In late November, Drs. Wilcox and 
ROBERT D. CROOM III (Surgery) 
attended the meeting of the Asso- 
ciation for Academic Surgery (Bos- 
ton) where Dr. Croom presented 
their findings on "Power dissipation 
and pulsatile parameters following 
right pulmonary artery occlusion in 
dogs." 

"Metabolic studies in psychiatry" 
was the topic of a lecture delivered 
by PROF. F. A. JENNER from the 
University Department of Psychi- 
atry at Middlewood Hospital (Shef- 
field, England) on November 14. 

By invitation of the Department of 
Radiology, DR. JEROME F. WIAT, 
professor of radiology at the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati College of 
Medicine, visited the school and 
lectured on "Radiology of chest 
trauma" (November 18). 




The members of the Whitehead So- 
ciety choose DEAN ISAAC M. TAY- 
LOR (above with W.S.'s vice presi- 
dent JAMES S. FULGHUM 71) to 
deliver the 1969 Whitehead Lecture. 



On November 19, Dean Taylor ad- 
dressed the student body and fac- 
ulty speaking on "How do we get 
from here to there?" 

During November and December, 
Dean Taylor also spoke to several 
alumni district meetings, as well 
as civic organizations throughout 
the state, on the aims and needs of 
the school. 



HEWS National Medical Audiovis- 
ual Center has announced the avail- 
ability of five new films on its clini- 
cal pathology series: "Theories of 
blood coagulation," "The hemophil- 
ioid disorders, clinical manifesta- 
tions and methods of diagnosis," 
"Treatment of the hemophilioid dis- 
orders," "Diffuse intravascular co- 
agulation," and "The fibrinolytic 
mechanism and test of fibrinolytic 
function." These films feature DR. 
HAROLD R. ROBERTS (Pathology & 
Medicine) and were made from 
videotaped lectures he delivered at 
Emory University School of Medi- 
cine. Produced by NMAC in coop- 
eration with DR. NORMAN ENDE, 
professor of pathology at Emory, 
the films are currently being used 
in the teaching curriculum of that 
university. 

"Current Approaches to the Evalua- 
tion and Prevention of Infectious 
Diseases" was the theme of the 
13th Annual School of Medicine 
Symposium, held on November 20- 
21. The program was divided into 
three main topics: "Common Infec- 
tious Agents— Weil-Known and Ob- 
scure," "Natural Defense Mechan- 
isms" and "Immunization." 

Guest speakers— all pediatricians- 
included three professors-chairmen, 
an associate professor and an as- 
sistant professor: DR. DAVID KAR- 
ZON from Vanderbilt School of 
Medicine, on "Contraindications 
and complications of immunization" 
and "Local antibody, an independ- 
ent diffuse system;" DR. SAMUEL 
KATZ from Duke University School 
of Medicine, on "Recent advances 
and retreats in immunizations;" and 
DR. EDWARD A. MORTIMER from 
the University of New Mexico School 
of Medicine, on "Staphylococci: A 
reasonable approach" and "L forms: 
Do they relate to disease?" Also 



from Duke University DR. DAVID J. 
LANG, on "The role of cytomega- 
lovirus in congential and acquired 
infection" and DR. JOHN F. GRIF- 
FITH, on "Atypical virus infections 
of the central nervous system." 

DR. FLOYD W. DENNY (Pediatrics) 
was responsible for organizing the 
program, and spoke on "Future 
needs and problems of vaccine de- 
velopment." Other UNC faculty 
participating in the two-day sympos- 
ium were: DR. WALLACE A. CLYDE 
(Prev. Medicine) on "Human myco- 
plasma infections," DR. JOSEPH S. 
PAGANO (Medicine & Bacteriology) 
on "The relationship of EB virus to 
infectious mononucleosis and other 
diseases," DR. JOHN K. SPITZNAG- 
EL (Bacteriology & Medicine) on 
"Phagocytes and resistance to in- 
fection" and, from the Department 
of Pediatrics, DR. W. PAUL GLEZEN 
on "Childhood tuberculosis and in- 
fection with mycobacteria other 
than tuberculosis," DR. FRANK A. 
LODA (also Sch. Public Health) on 
"Lower respiratory infections in 
children" and DR. GERALD W. FER- 
NALD on "A practical approach to 
evaluation of immune mechan- 



Addressing North Carolina's 21st 
annual Special Education Confer- 
ence, DR. GEORGE S. WELSCH— 
clinical professor of psychology 
(Psychiatry)— urged public school 
educators to recognize varied per- 
sonality types of gifted students and 
to be more flexible in dealing with 
talented children. He based his re- 
marks on studies he ma^e while 
serving as a consultant to the Gov- 
ernor's School in Winston-Salem 
which are the subject of a recently 
published manual, "Gifted Adoles- 
cents: A Handbook of Test Results," 
available from Prediction Press in 
Greensboro. 

The Conference, held in Charlotte 
(November 20-22) was co-sponsored 
by the N. C. Department of Public 
Instruction, the Charlotte Chapter 
Council for Exceptional Children, 
and the Special Education Depart- 
ment of the Charlotte /Mecklenburg 
Schools. 

On November 21, DR. EWALD 
BUSSE spoke on "Biological and 



39 



behavioral changes after sixty" by 
invitation of the Department of Psy- 
chiatry. Dr. Busse is a member of 
the Department of Psychiatry at the 
Duke University IVIedical Center. 

On the same day, DR. WILLIAM W. 
McLENDON from Moses H. Cone 
Memorial Hospital (Greensboro) 
spoke to the members of the De- 
partment of Pathology on "Osmo- 
metry in the clinical laboratory." 

DRS. WILLIAM B. RADCLIFFE and 
JULIAN H. CAPPS (Radiology) con- 
ducted a refresher course in abdom- 
inal angiography at the Annual Con- 
vention of the Radiological Society 
of North America, held in Chicago 
from November 30 to December 5. 

DR. LEWIS N. TERRY (Radiology) 
also attended the Convention and 
delivered a paper entitled "Sequen- 
tial methotrexate and irradiation: 
Results of a randomized study in 
head and neck cancer." 



Members of the Department of 
Medicine, Division of Dermatology, 
participated in the annual meeting 
of the American Academy of Derma- 
tology (AAD) held in Miami on Dec- 
ember 6-11: 

DRS. ROBERT A. BRIGGAMAN and 
TOMMY B. GRIFFIN presented 
papers at a symposium on "Recent 
Advances in Biological Sciences in 
Relation to Dermatology." They re- 
spectively spoke on "Epidermal- 
dermal interaction in adult human 
skin" and "Miliaria and the sweat 
retension syndrome." Dr. Brigga- 
man also took part in the sympos- 
ium on "Fundamentals of Cutane- 
ous Allergy and Immunology" by 
reporting his findings on delayed 
hypersensitivity. 

DR. CLAYTON E. WHEELER, JR. 
directed a microbiology course on 
"The Superficial and Deep Mycoses" 
and delivered a paper entitled 
"Virus diseases of the mucous mem- 
branes" on the symposium "Lesions 
of Mucous Membranes." 

Dr. Wheeler, a member of AAD's 
Committee on Membership and Ad- 
visory Committee to the Food and 
Drug Administration, was elected 
by the academy to be its represen- 



tative on the American Board of 
Dermatology. Board members ordi- 
narily serve for a period of nine 
years. 

At the meeting of the Association 
of Professors of Dermatology, also 
held in Miami in December, Dr. 
Wheeler was elected to the associa- 
tion's Board of Directors. 

On January 18, he was the guest of 
the Louisiana Dermatological Soci- 
ety in New Orleans. During the 
next two days he was visiting pro- 
fessor on the dermatology services 
of Tulane and Louisiana State Uni- 
versity medical schools and lectured 
on "Herpes simplex infections" and 
"Viral diseases of skin and mucous 
membranes." 



DR. JOSEPH F. PATTERSON (Surg- 
ery) left the Hill early in December 
for a three-month stay in South 
Vietnam. He was at the Children's 
Medical Relief International (CMRI) 
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 
Center in Saigon, where he served 
as an anesthesiologist for the surgi- 
cal teams, as well as a teacher of 
Vietnamese medical students. 

CMRI is a philanthropic organiza- 
tion founded in 1967 which surveys a 
country's medical needs at the in- 
vitation of the host government, 
plans and creates the appropriate 
hospital facilities, and sends inter- 
national teams to initiate the pro- 
grams and train local physicians. 
The Saigon center opened on Octo- 
ber 6 and was designed to aid war- 
injured children. According to Dr. 
Patterson, the group's ultimate aim 
is to enable the native doctors to 
take over the centers themselves. 



versify of Wyoming, he comes to 
UNC from the University of Utah 
College of Medicine where he was 
assistant dean for business and 
financial affairs. He had been at 
UU since 1954. 





MR. CLARENCE N. STOVER, JR. 
has been named assistant dean for 
administration. A graduate of Colo- 
rado State University and the Uni- 



Mr. Stover succeeds MR. JAMES R. 
TURNER, who had held the post for 
four years and left to become the 
administrative director of Children's 
Hospital Medical Center in Cincin- 
nati. 



DR. H. STANLEY BENNETT (Anat- 
omy) attended meetings of the or- 
ganizing committee for the Third 
International Conference on Theo- 
retical Physics and Biology in Ver- 
sailles, France, on December 13-14. 
The Conference will be held in that 
city in June, 1971. 



During the period August-Decem- 
ber the Community Psychiatry Sec- 
tion, Department of Psychiatry, 
sponsored 36 lectures/seminars by 
25 guest speakers covering a wide 
spectrum on the planning and 
running of psychiatric community 
centers. This program is to continue 
throughout the academic year. 



The school's Committee on Admis- 
sions was completely revamped this 
year to include members of the stu- 
dent body. Three voting members 
were appointed from the sophomore 
(J. Ronald Hunt), junior (William D. 
Kassens) and senior (T. Reed Under- 
hill) classes respectively. Nine addi- 
tional students have served as 
auxiliary interviewers: Frederick G. 
Kroncke, Thomas A. Roberts, 
Charles E. Thompson ('70), David M. 
McFadden, C. Langley Smith ('71), 
Don A. Gabriel, Sampson E. Harrell 
and J. Richard Young ('72). The con- 
tributions of the student members 
have been outstanding. 



40 



The full committee has been hard 
at work processing 12071 applica- 
tions, interviewing 460 applicants 
and making the difficult relative de- 
cisions necessary to fill the 100 po- 
sitions in the class to enter in the 
fall of 1970. 



Two of the 40 Faculty Development 
Awards granted in the country by 
the Merck, Sharpe & Dohme Co. 
Foundation were bestowed to mem- 
bers of our faculty: DR. GARY W. 
COOPER (Pharmacology) and DR. 
WILLIAM D. Molester (Pathology). 




Assistant professor Cooper received 
his Ph.D. from Rice University in 
1965 and joined the Department of 
Pharmacology in September, 1966. 

Also an assistant professor, Dr. Mc- 
Lester ('65; Ph.D. Pathology '67) had 




just returned to the Hill in October 
after two years of military duty. 

The Merck awards provide each 
recipient unrestricted funds in the 
amount of $5,000. 



The Department of Biochemistry 
sponsored 12 seminars during the 
fall semester, conducted by mem- 
bers of our faculty and visiting lec- 
turers. Among the visitors were 
DR. CHARLES TANFORD, Duke Uni- 
versity; DR. RICHARD V. WOLFEN- 
DEN, Princeton University; DR. 
FREDERICK C. WEDLER, University 
of California at Los Angeles; DR. 
RICHARD B. SETLOW, Oak Ridge 
National Laboratory; DR. CHANG- 
AN YU, University of Illinois; and 
DR. MAXINE SINGER, National In- 



stitute of Arthritis and Metabolic 
Disease. 



DR. WILLIAM F. HUGHES, profes- 
sor of ophthalmology at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois and chairman of the 
Department of Ophthalmology at 
Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, 
delivered the 8th Dace McPherson 
Memorial Lecture on January 10 
under the title "Beta radiation 
therapy in ophthalmology." 




DR. MORRIS A. LIPTON is the new 
chairman of the Department of Psy- 
chiatry. He succeeds DR. JOHN A. 
EWING who retired from the chair 
in December 1969. 




Thirty-five members of the senior class and their wives spent December 28 through January 1st in Nevsi York City as guests of Lederle 
Laboratories and Squibb & Sons, E. R. The students toured the Squibb facilities on the 29th and attended lectures at Lederle on the 
next day. Wednesday the 31st was their "free" day to tour the city, but they gathered to dine at Mama Leone's, party at the Manhattan 
Hotel (where they stayed) and await the new year in Times Square. The trip for the 4th year students has been sponsored annually by 
the drug companies for several years. 



41 



At the annual week-end meeting of 
the Robert A. Ross Society of Ob- 
stetricians and Gynecologists, held 
in Chapel Hill on January 30-Febru- 
ary 1, DR. ROSS was specially hon- 
ored by the presentation of his por- 
trait to the Department of Obstet- 
rics and Gynecology. The society 
is composed of past and present 
faculty and residents of the depart- 
ment. 



The Whitehead Medical Society 
sponsored a symposium on "Organi- 
zation and Delivery of Medical Care" 
held on the evening of February 3. 
DRS. EDGAR T. BEDDINGFIELD, 
JR. ('46), president of the Medical 
Society of the State of North Caro- 
lina, HARVEY L SMITH, assistant 
to the vice-chancellor for health 
sciences and ROBERT SMITH (Prev. 
Medicine and Medicine) spoke on 
the history, resources and needs of 
medical care in North Carolina. 



The Student Health Action Commit- 
tee (SHAC) is continuing to main- 
tain its clinic projects with ever in- 
creasing success. The Edgemont 
Community Clinic has been relo- 
cated in a larger structure after 
fire destroyed the original building 
last summer. With the help of 
NCMH, Duke Hospital, Tompson 
Dental Company and many others, 
the new clinic has been re-equipped, 
there now being six examining 
rooms and a dental office with two 
chairs. Beginning in March the 
clinic will be in operation twice a 
week. 

The Chapel Hill Clinic is expanding 
and functions on a once-a-week 
basis. 

In addition to the clinics, SHAC 
has undertaken a new project: 
Listening Point, a counseling serv- 
ice for UNC students. An office in 
the YMCA is manned from 7:00 p.m. 
until midnight by a medical student 
who has finished his psychiatry ro- 
tation and is open to students who 
wish to discuss problems that they 
are unwilling, or unable, to take to 
the established counseling services 
on campus. No records are kept of 
these visits. As part of the project, 
a hot-line suicide prevention phone 
is expected to be in operation in the 
near future. 



SHAC, though, continues to have 
financial difficulties. At present suf- 
ficient funds are not available to 
see the projects through the sum- 
mer, and no prospects for continued 
financing are in sight. With the 



enthusiastic student and faculty 
effort and community support, SHAC 
is determined to carry on its pro- 
grams, even on a shoe string bud- 
get if necessary. 





E 



Drs. Hugh M. Shingleton, Ross and Taylor. 




The new Edgemont Community Clinic. 



SHAC volunteers Gloria Giaveno (Sch. 
Nursing 70) and Don Gabriel (72). 




42 




THURSDAYS 

ARE FOR 

KEEPING UP 



The Office of Continuation 
Education presents FOCUS 
ON MEDICINE— Thursdays 
at 8-9 a.m. and 10-11 p.m. 
on your local UNC Tele- 
vision Network channel. 




12 Series Introduction — Edgar Beddingfield, 
M.D., president, Medical Society of the 
State of N. C. 

CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY 
DISEASE— Thomas Barnett, M.D.. and Wil- 
liam Wood, M.D„ UNC School Of Medicine. 

19 PULMONARY EMBOLISM — Stephen Levy, 
M.D., UCLA School of Medicine. 

26 COR PULMONALE— Edward Bergosky, M.D., 
Roberta Goldring, M.D., and Gustave Lau- 
renzi, M.D., New York Academy of Medi- 
cine. 
5 ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION — 
George Griffith, M.D., University of South- 
ern California; Calhoun Witham, M.D., and 
Bleadley Chandler, M.D., Medical College 
of Georgia. 

12 CLINICAL USE OF ELECTRICAL IMPLANT- 
ABLE PACEMAKERS— Hilmon Castle, M.D., 
Richard Hughes, M.D., University of Utah 
College of Medicine. Comments: Ernest 
Craige, M.D., UNC School of Medicine. 

19 THE MEDICAL INTERVIEW— Allen Enelow, 
M.D., Michigan State University College of 
Human Medicine, and Dale Groom, M.D., 
Medical University of South Carolina. 

26 PANCREATITIS AND ITS MANAGEMENT— 
David Dreiling, M.D., Henry Janowitz, M.D., 
and 0. D. Kowlessar, M.D., New York Acad- 
emy of Medicine. 
2 ESOPHAGEAL HIATAL HERNIA — Lyman 
Brewer, M.D., University of California at 
Irvine College of Medicine. Comments: 



John Sessions, M.D., UNC School of Medi- 
cine. 
9 THERAPY OF GASTROINTESTINAL BLEED- 
ING— William Grace, M.D., Clarence Dennis, 
M.D., Stephen Wangensteen, M.D., New 
York Academy of Medicine. 

16 PROBLEMS IN CNS TRAUMA— Robert Tim- 
mons, M.D., Edward Hogan, M.D., and 
William Radcliffe, M.D., UNC School of 
Medicine. 

23 CNS INTERVENTION: VASCULAR PROB- 
LEMS— Arthur Cerf, M.D., Glenn Cross, 
M.D., Malvern Dorinson, M.D., Thomas New- 
ton, M.D., University of California at San 
Francisco. 

30 ELECTROLYTE DISTURBANCES IN IN- 
FANTS— Chester Edelmann, M.D., Laurence 
Finberg, M.D., and Leonard Taitz, M.D., 
New York Academy of Medicine. 
MAY 7 EARLY CLINICAL ASPECTS OF MENTAL 
RETARDATION— U. S. Public Health Serv- 
ice. Comments. Harry Chamberlin, M.D., 
UNC School of Medicine. 

14 MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC RENAL IN- 
SUFFICIENCY— Louis G. Welt, M.D., UNC 
School of Medicine, 

21 LSD: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS — 
Keith Ditman, M.D.. UCLA School of Medi- 
cine. 

28 CURRENT STATUS OF ABORTIONS — 
Charles Hendricks, M.D., et al., UNC School 
of Medicine. 



43 





l <g ll WM> .I W I W>»lll M l INMWWI 

DEDICATION CEREMONIES 

J. SPENCER LOVE CLINICS AND 
AMBULATORY PATIENT CARE CENTER 

OF NORTH CAROLINA MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL / UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA r CHAPEL HILL 

Sunday and Monday, February 8 and 9 
nineteen hundred seventy 



DEDICATION CEREMONY 
2:15 p.m. Sunday, February 8, 1970 

Presiding Isaac M. Taylor, M.D. ' 

Dean, UNC School of Medicine 

Choral Selections University of North Carolina Mens Glee Club '' 

Robert Porco, Director 

Invocation Fred W. Reid 

Chaptain, North Carolina Memorial Hospital 

Choral Selections 

Introduction of Platform Reece Berryhill, M.D. ■ 

Dean Emeritus, UNC School of Medicine 
Sarah Graham Kenan Professor of Medicine 

Remarks William C. Friday 

President, UNC 

Perspective Lieutenant Governor Patrick Taylor 

Awarding of Plaque J. Carlyle Sitterson '■ 

Chancellor, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Presentation of Facility C. Arden Miller, M.D. ' 

Vice Chancellor of Health Sciences, UNC 

Acceptance of Facility Harold P. Coston * 

Acting Director, North Carolina Memorial Hospital 

Refreshments and Tour of Faqlity 




Mrs. Ayers 




J. Spencer Love III, James S. Love, Jr., Nancy Love, Mrs. Nathan Ayers (the former Mrs. J. Spencer Love) and Mr. Charles F. 
Myers, Jr., Chairman uf Burlington Industries. 

a. 9niNqf% i0Vi cuNia 




45 




SCIENTIFIC SESSION 
The Vertical Patient 
Monday, February 9, 1970 



10:00 Registration 
Presiding 



C. Arden Miller, M.D. 

Vice Chancellor of Health Sciences, UNC 

10:30 Welcome and Introductions 
Isaac M. Taylor, M.D. 

Dean. UNC School of Medicine 
William J. Cromarrie, M.D. ' 

Chief of Staff, North Carolina Memorial Hospital; 

Dean, Clinical Sciences, UNC School of Medicine 



"Medical Education and Community Needs for 
Medical Care" 

Robert H. Ebert, M.D. ' 

Dean, Faculty of Medicine Harvard Medical School: 
President, Harvard Medical Center 



12:00 Luncheon 



"Role of Ambulatory Patient Care in Community 
Health Services" 

John W. Cashman, M.D. ^ 

Assistant Surgeon General, Director of Community Health Service — 
U.S.P.H.S.. United States Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare. 






2:15 "Education for Community Practice" — Panel 

MODERATOR: Cecil G. Sheps, M. D. 

Director, Health Services Research Center, UNC 

"Family Practice:" Edmund D. Pellegrino, M.D. * 

Vice President, Health Sciences; Dean, State University of New 
York at Stony Brook Health Sciences Center — Medical School 

"Group Practice:" Ernest W. Saward, M.D. 

Medical Director, The Permanente Qinic. Portland. Oregon 

Discussants: Isaac M. Taylor, M.D. 

Dean, UNC School of Medicine 
Manson Meads, M.D. 

Vice President, Medical Affairs: Dean, The Bowman Gray 

School of Medicine of Wake Forest University 
William G. Anlyan, M.D. 

Associate Provost, Medical Affairs; Dean, Duke University 

School of Medicine 

Edgar T. Beddingfield, Jr., M.D. ' 

President, Medical Society of the State of North Carolina 

4:30 "Medical Research Potential in Ambulatory Care" 
Edward H. Kass, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Bacteriaiogy and Immunology, Harvard 
Medical School 

5:15 Summary Remarks 

C. Arden MiUer, M.D. 

Vice Chancellor of Health Sciences, UNC 




46 




South Addition — /. Spencer Love Climes 
and Ambulatory Care Center: 

Admissions and cashiers 

Emergency services complex 

181 examination-treatment rooms 

Department of Radiology 

Qinical Research Unit 

Birth Defect Treatment Center 

Pharmacy 

Clinical laboratories 

Teaching and conference rooms 

Patients and personnel food preparation center 

North Addition: 
Surgical suite 

Division of Physical Therapy 
Division of Occupational Therapy 





48 








49 






51 



Alumni News 



PRESIDENT: 

H. Haynes Baird ('40) 

PRESIDENT ELECT: 
Charles L Herring ('55) 

VICE PRESIDENT: 
W. Howard Wilson ('35) 

SECRETARY: 

Hugh C. Hemmings ('54) 

TREASURER: 
James Thorp ('57) 

COUNCILLORS: Julian S. Albergotti, 
Jr. ('55); Alton J. Coppridge ('51); 
Harold L Godwin ('45); William 
Moretz ('37); Stephen C. Pugh ('57); 
Daniel H. Seals ('51); Lewis S. Thorp, 
Jr. ('50); Isaac C. Wright (43M); Ern- 
est H. Yelton ('41); F. A. (Ted) Blount 
('42); Dean C. Jones, Jr. ('56); Robert 
M. McMillan ('36); S. Malone Par- 
ham ('43D); J. Olin Perritt ('50); 
Charles J. Sawyer III ('63); John Cot- 
ten Tayloe, Jr. ('60); Zebulon Weaver 
III ('61); George Johnson, Jr. ('50); 
Samuel B. Joyner ('55); Edward B. 
McKenzie ('49); Charles P. Nicholson 
(HS); Cornelius T. Patrick ('54); 
Howard A. Patterson ('23); George D. 
Penick ('44); J. Iverson Riddle ('56). 

1907 

HARRY HARRISON (712 Botetourt 
St., Norfolk, Va. 23507), who was 82 
years old in August, has been prac- 
ticing medicine for 58 years. He is 
now semiretired. 

Dr. Harrison has three sons and five 
grandchildren. He writes that his 
oldest grandchild, Gail Harrison, is 
a converted Tar Heel and a student 
at UNC— a fact "of which I am 
very proud." 

1908 

JOHN CARROLL WIGGINS (4220 
Glenn Ave., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
29705) graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in 1910 and 
served internships at St. Agnes Hos- 
pital and Philadelphia General Hos- 
pital. In the late 1920's he "went on 



a visit to Miami, Fla., and remained 
three years there in general prac- 
tice." Later, he moved to Buffalo, 
N. Y., where he practiced for 20 years. 
After the death of his first wife, he 
came to Winston-Salem (1952) and 
has been doing six hours daily of 
office practice since that time. He 
is a member of the A.M.A. 50-year 
club. 

He married the former Lillian K. 
Peterson of Buffalo; they live at 207 
Woodbriar Road in Winston-Salem. 
His son, John Carroll, also lives in 
Winston-Salem, where he practices 
internal medicine. 



1909 

JOSEPH HENRY CUTCHIN (Whitak- 
ers, N. C. 27891) was the only one 
of the four surviving members of his 
medical class to attend the general 
UNC alumni luncheon held at the 
Carolina Inn on June 1st. He had 
written his classmates in hopes that 
they could meet and was disap- 
pointed when they could not make 
it. 

Dr. Cutchin was recently awarded a 
diamond-set emblem and a certifi- 
cate commemorating his 40 years of 
service with the Seaboard Coast Line 
Railroad. 



1914 

ADOLPHUS B. GREENWOOD (Route 
7, Box 1190, Asheville, N. C. 28803) 
has retired from practice. 



1915 

SAMUEL R. NEWMAN (770 Main St., 
Danville, Va. 24541) celebrated his 
seventy-ninth birthday on June 21, 
1969 and is still in active practice. 

Dr. Newman received his M.D. de- 
gree from the University of Virginia, 
where he was editor of the Univer- 
sity of Virginia IVIagazine and found- 
er of the University of Virginia Chap- 
ter of Phi Epsilon Pi. After serving 
two years in the Army during World 



War I, he became assistant health 
officer and city bacteriologist in 
Danville. In 1921 he was appointed a 
member of the Medical Commission 
of the Joint Distribution Committee 
and was assigned to Warsaw, Poland, 
as medical commissioner. In 1922 
he was appointed hospitant at the 
Children's Clinic of the University 
of Vienna, where he remained for a 
year as a member of the medical 
faculty. In 1923 he located in Dan- 
ville for the practice of pediatrics 
and was appointed clinician for the 
Child Health Clinic. He also served 
as clinician for the Children's Clinic 
of the Charity League in Martins-, 
ville, Va., and for the Junior Wednes- 
day Club Clinic in Danville. In 1954, 
the name of this clinic was changed 
to The Samuel Newman Children's 
Clinic, "in his honor and in com- 
memoration of his noble service to 
humanity." This is not the only dis- 
tinction conferred on him. In June 
of the same year he received an 
honorary Doctor of Hebrew Letters 
degree from the Hebrew Union Col- 
lege and Jewish Institute of Reli- 
gion. In 1955 ". . . because Dr. Sam- 
uel Newman has abundantly blessed 
the indigent children of Martins- 
ville and Henry County with his in- 
finite skill, his gentle compassion 
and his sacrificial endeavors during 
the past twenty four years . . . the 
Charity League of Martinsville here- 
by establishes the Samuel Newman 
Hospital Fund in a sincere desire to 
honor this great physician . . ." 
Many other organizations have 
recognized in similar manner his 
medical and civic contributions. 



1916 

FRED C. HUBBARD (Box 36, North 
Wilkesboro, N. C. 28659). After more 
than 50 years of practice he is still 
"leading a very active professional 
life." 



1917 

WILLIAM J. B. ORR (4050 Ocean 
Drive, Apt. 510, Lauderdale-by-the- 



52 



Sea, Fla. 33308), as we have previous- 
ly reported, practiced general sur- 
gery in Washington, D. C. until his 
retirement 15 years ago. He and his 
wife live in an ocean-front apart- 
ment, but spend two months every 
summer at their mountain cabin at 
Berkeley Springs, W. Va. He has "an 
occasional attack of gout and kidney 
colic, but am thankful I am living. 
I was 'discovered' in 1892, so am no 
longer a boy . . ." Dr. Orr enjoys 
hearing from his classmates. "One 
of the most outstanding events 
within the past year was receiving 
the fifty-year certificate at Chapel 
Hill ... My wife was with me, and 
we marveled at the changes and 
improvements. 

WILLIAM RANEY STANFORD (1411 
Alabama Ave., Durham, N. C. 27705) 
is still practicing internal medicine 
full time, in 1969 he received 50- 
year certificates from the University 
of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 
and from the Medical Society of the 
State of North Carolina. 



1922 

HERBERT H. FRITZ (110 Pennswood 
Rd., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010) is still in 
general practice and is physician to 
the Bryn Mawr Hospital. A com- 
mander in the Naval Reserve, he is 
a past president of the Main Line 
Medical Society, a director of the 
Bryn Mawr Trust Company, and a 
fellow of the College of Physicians 
of Philadelphia. 

He was married to Margaret Peters 
in 1930 and they have two daughters, 
both married, and six grandchildren. 



1923 

MARSHALL PAUL BYERLY (6415 
Murray Hill Rd., Baltimore, Md. 
21212) who has practiced medicine 
in Baltimore for 42 years, has de- 
cided to "relinquish being a Mary- 
land Crab . . . and to retire to my 
native state and again become a 
Tar Heel." 

FRED KESLER GARVEY (440 Fairfax 
Dr., Winston-Salem, N. C. 27104) re- 
tired on May 1, 1969, as professor 
and chief of the Department of 
Urology at the Bowman Gray School 



of Medicine, a position he had held 
since 1941. He received his M.D. 
degree from the University of Cin- 
cinnati in 1925 and his urologic 
training at Knoxville General Hos- 
pital, Brady Urologic Clinic, and 
the Urologic Clinic of Philadelphia. 
From 1933 until 1941, he was en- 
gaged in the private practice of 
urology in Winston-Salem. 

HOWARD A. PATTERSON (25 Syca- 
more St., Bronxville, N. Y. 10708) is 
semiretired, although he does a good 
deal of consultation work in the 
field of surgery and some teaching. 
He is a member of the Advisory 
Council to the Board of Regents of 
the American College of Surgeons. 
He writes that he and his wife, Sally, 
"enjoy our 7 grandchildren, our cabin 
in the Adirondacks, and many hob- 
bies, especially that of flowering 
shrubs." 



1925 

JOHN H. HUNT (8070 Montgomery 
Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio 45236) was re- 
cently married to Shirley Anne Brown 
Atkins, a graduate of the University 
of Cincinnati, and was promoted to 
associate clinical professor of pedi- 
atrics at the College of Medicine in 
the University of Cincinnati. He is 
a fellow of the American Academy 
of Pediatrics and has a "very active 
pediatric practice, which includes 
general pediatrics, pediatric allergy, 
and emotional problems of child- 
hood." 



1928 

ERNEST W. FRANKLIN, JR. (1324 
Scott Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 28200) 
has practiced obstetrics and gyne- 
cology in Charlotte for 35 years. 
Through the years he has been ac- 
tive in many community organiza- 
tions, particularly those related to 
medicine. 



1933 

RUTH DIXON HENLEY (168 Forsyth 
Medical Park, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
27103) has been engaged in private 
practice in downtown Winston-Salem 
for 31 years. She has recently moved 
her office to the suburbs, and her 
new address is given above. 



JOSEPH M. SHACHTMAN (9735 Wil- 
shire Blvd., Beverly Hills, Calif. 
90212) has recently retired as chief 
of cardiology at the Mount Sinai Di- 
vision of Cedars Sinai Medical Cen- 
ter and is now director of cardiology 
at the Midway Hospital, where he 
has completed the development of 
a 22-bed cardiac care unit (12 acute 
beds and 10 observation beds). 

Joe's oldest son is a third-year stu- 
dent at Albany Medical School. His 
second son has finished studying 
architecture at the University of 
California at Berkeley and is going 
into stage-designing. His daughter 
has completed her freshman year at 
San Fernando Valley State College 
in Theater Arts. His wife is involved 
in many activities of the Los Angeles 
Heart Association, Queen of Angels 
Hospital, Cedars-Sinai Medical Cen- 
ter, and various other organizations. 
He has retired from many of his 
teaching duties and now has "more 
time to devote to a 'new game' 
called golf." 



1934 

ARCHIE L BARRINGER (Box 278, 
Mt. Pleasant, N. C. 28124) has re- 
cently moved into a new office in Mt. 
Pleasant, where he has been carry- 
ing on a general practice since 1937 
except for a three-year tour of naval 
duty during World War II. He has 
been the only physician in the com- 
munity since 1958 and is looking for 
a partner. 

Archie is married to the former Mary 
Foil (UNC-G '33) and they have two 
sons: Archie Lee, a special agent 
with Bankers Life in Charlotte, and 
Robert D., a rising senior at Pfeiffer 
College. 

CARL PiGMAN (Box 390, Whites- 
burg, Ky. 41858) is engaged in gen- 
eral practice in Whitesburg and 
Letcher County, and is chief of staff 
of the Whitesburg Appalachian Re- 
gional Hospital. 



1935 

FRANK EDMONDSON (167 McArthur 
St., Asheboro, N. C. 27203) is presi- 
dent of the N. C. State Board of 
Medical Examiners. 



53 



ROWLAND F. ZEIGLER (305 W. Pal- 
metto St., Florence, S. C. 29501) is 
coauthor— with Bert C. Porreca — of 
Olive Shells of the World, published 
by Richard E. Petit (Box 133, Ocean 
Drive Beach, S. C. 29582). The book, 
illustrated with full-color pictures, 
sells for $12.95. 



1936 

SHERWOOD W. BAREFOOT (1030 
Professional Village, Greensboro, N. 
C. 27401) was president of the Guil- 
ford County Medical Society for 
1969. 



1937 

JULES B. AARON (154 Beach 142 
St., Neponsit, N. Y. 11694) writes that 
his son, Roy Kenneth, graduated in 
1969 from the Downstate Medical 
Center, State University of New 
Yorl<, and is serving an internship in 
the Montefiore Hospital in New York 
City. 

1939 

DANIEL HOUSTON BUCHANAN, JR. 
(3247 S. Dallas Court, Denver, Colo. 
80210) graduated from Harvard 
Medical School in 1941 and interned 
at Bellevue Hospital until March, 
1942. He then spent six years in the 
Army, serving part of that time as 



chief of radiology at Camp Sibert 
Station Hospital in Alabama. Fol- 
lowing his discharge in 1946, he had 
a two-year medical residency at 
Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit be- 
fore locating in Denver for the prac- 
tice of internal medicine. He was 
certified by the American Board of 
Internal Medicine in 1952 and is as- 
sociate clinical professor of medi- 
cine at the University of Colorado 
Medical School. 

Houston was married during his in- 
ternship to Louise Grabow. They 
"have had the good fortune to have 
a wonderful marriage and three fine 
children: Dick, age 26, who was re- 
cently married; Dave, age 25, who is 
in the Navy stationed in Taiwan; and 
Carol, 18, who is at Lewis and Clark 
College and spent the second and 
third quarters of her freshman year 
as an overseas student in Japan." 
He and his wife recently partici- 
pated in the "Three Cities of Cardi- 
ology" program sponsored by the 
American Heart Association, visiting 
Washington, London, and Edinburgh. 

JESSE B. CALDWELL (114 W. Third 
Ave., Gastonia, N. C. 28052) has prac- 
ticed obstetrics and gynecology in 
Gastonia since 1950. He has been 
elected a trustee of the new $15,- 
000,000 Gaston County Hospital, now 
in the planning and construction 
stage. 



1941 

ERNEST C. RICHARDSON, JR. (507 
Pollack St., New Bern, N. C. 28560) 
reports that his son, Ernest III, 
graduated from UNC last June. 

FREDERICK L TUNICK (144-14 New- 
port Ave., Neponsit, L I., N. Y. 11694) 
left the private practice of pediatrics 
after 20 years to take a full-time job 
with the federal government, in the 
Children's Bureau. He is director of 
a Comprehensive Child Care Service 
in the Bedford-Stuyvesant area of 
Brooklyn, and is also assistant pro- 
fessor of clinical pediatrics at Down- 
state Medical Center of the State 
University of New York. 

1942 

ROBERT E. SUMMER (804 Myrtle 
Drive, Rock Hill, S. C. 29730) is prac- 
ticing medicine in Rock Hill in a 
three-man partnership. His oldest 
daughter, Beth, is a sophomore at 
Winthrop College; Bobby, 17, is a 
senior in high school; and Jane, 14, 
is "a real horse lover." 



1943D 

ETHEL G. LAWNER MARSHALL 
(1905 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City, N. 
J. 07305) has been included in the 
6th edition of "Who's Who of Ameri- 
can Women" (October, 1969). 




At the meeting of districts XII and XIV, held in Greensboro on November 19: William W. McLendon ('56), Robert G. Brame ('55), speakers 
Robert Smith, Dean Isaac M. Taylor, W. Reece Berryhlll ('25) and William B. Herring and John F. Lynch ('42). 



54 



1944 

CLARENCE M. MILLER, JR. (438 
Oliver Rd., Sewickley, Pa. 15143). 
"Pill" has a problem about which we 
are sure he would welcome the ad- 
vice and experience of his class- 
mates. He is "trying to find a way 
to keep the blubber down without 
sacrificing martinis since giving up 
smoking several years ago." In the 
meantime, he is "also spending 
some time directing laboratory and 
puttering around with fluorescent 
microscopy immunology procedure." 
He confesses that he is "not having 
phenomenal success with any of 
above ventures." 

The Millers have two sons, the old- 
est, Jim, at Cornell, and the young- 
est, Dick, at UNC. 



1945 

COURTNEY D. EGERTON (3622 Ha- 
worth Dr., Raleigh, N. C. 27609) has 
practiced obstetrics and gynecology 
in Raleigh for 16 years. He and his 
partners, Ruark, Greer, and Hall, 
have recently completed their new 
office building in the North Hills 
section of Raleigh. He warns "any- 
one against building his own build- 
ing unless he has the patience of 
Job, the financial backing of Rocke- 
feller, and a large bottle of Exedrin." 

The Egertons have become skiing 
enthusiasts and are building a small 
chalet at Beech Mountain, so that 
they can ski in the winter and golf 
in the summer. "The chalet will be 
available for rent if any of the 
alumni are interested." 

Courtney's wife is the former Nancy 
Upshaw of Raleigh, and they have 
three children: Stuart, 15; Barbara, 
14; and Alice, 12. 

ROGER A. SMITH (365 East 21st St., 
San Bernardino, Calif. 92404) made 
a trip to the Scandinavian countries 
this summer and also spent five 
weeks in the Soviet Union visiting 
Leningrad, Kalinin, Moscow, and 
Kiev. 

FERDINAND F. SZABO (1505 Laurel 
Dr., Berwick, Pa. 18603) is practicing 
general surgery in Berwick, Pa., a 
town of about 25,000. In addition to 
a son, Robert, who is a sophomore at 



Wake Forest University, the Szabos 
have two daughters: Janet, 15, and 
Lydie, 12. 

COLEMAN M. WHITLOCK (1509 
Riverview Dr., West, Elkhart, Ind. 
46514) is U. S. area medical director 
of the Ames Company, a division of 
Miles Laboratories, Inc. 

After four daughters, he has a son, 
Drury, now 2. His oldest daughter, 
Cathy, is a junior at Michigan State, 
where she is taking pre-medical 
courses (she is also a singer). 



1946 

GEORGE A. McLEMORE, JR. (728 
Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 10021) is 
combining the practice of internal 
medicine with some teaching at 
Cornell University Medical College. 
He is active in the UNC alumni 
chapter in New York City. Among the 
alumni that he sees occasionally are 
McLeod Riggins ('22), Bill Christen- 
son ('49) and Jesse Trott (UNC '43). 

George and his wife have one child, 
Beth, who is 6 years old. 

WILLIAM E. SHEELY (1231 Kingston 
Ave., Alexandria, Va. 22302) is still 
practicing radiology with a group of 
six in northern Virginia and in Wash- 
ington, D. C. He reports two "mile- 
stones" in 1969: he was elected to 
fellowship in the American College 
of Radiology, and his oldest daugh- 
ter started college. 



1948 

EMILY TUFTS (3929 S.W. Mt. Adams 
Drive, Portland, Ore. 97201) has been 
at the University of Oregon Medical 
School for five years. She enjoys 
"living in the Northwest and finds 
Western hospitality just as hospita- 
ble as Southern hospitality." Her 
avocation is painting, and the Bul- 
letin is grateful to her for permitting 
us to publish one of her delightful 
watercolors in our last issue. 



1950 

FREDERICK 0. BOWMAN, JR. (161 
Fort Washington Ave., New York, N. 
Y. 10032) is associate professor of 
clinical surgery at the College of 



Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia 
University. The Bowmans' fourth 
son was born in April, 1969. 

BENJAMIN HARRIS JOSEPHSON 
(201 S. Springfield Ave., Springfield, 
N. J. 07081) is practicing pediatrics 
in Springfield. 

JOHN L. WATTERS (22 Deer Trail 
Rd., North Caldwell, N. J. 07006) 
writes that his "position as corpo- 
rate medical director at Becton, 
Dickinson and Company (Rutherford, 
N. J.) continues to be exciting, with 
increasing involvement in bio-medi- 
cal engineering. We are moving our 
Corporate Research Center to the 
Research Triangle Park, which will 
make for more frequent trips for me 
to North Carolina. Additional rea- 
sons for returning to Tar Heelia are 
John, who is in aeronautical engi- 
neering at N. C. State, and Liza who 
is a freshman in nursing school at 
UNC. Bill, who is in the Air Force, 
plans to come south to college when 
he gets out. Tom and Amy, ages 13 
and 15, haven't decided yet." 

HADLEY McDEE WILSON (113 Sky 
View Dr., Boone, N. C. 28607) served 
from 1965-1969 on Boone City Coun- 
cil and is an elder in the First Pres- 
byterian Church. The Wilsons have 
four children: Clarence (senior in 
pre-medicine) and Gray (freshman) 
at Davidson, and Julia Dee (senior) 
and Hadley (sophomore) at Watauga 
High School. 

1951 

CHARLES D. CONNOR (4800 E. Val- 
ley Vista Lane, Scottsdale, Ariz. 
85251) was certified in anatomical 
and clinical pathology in 1968 and 
elected to fellowship in the Ameri- 
can Society of Clinical Pathologists 
in the same year. In 1969, he be- 
came a fellow of the College of 
American Pathologists. 

1954 

LEON K. COWAN (468 DeWitt St, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 14213) had been en- 
gaged in the private practice of der- 
matology in Rapid City, South Da- 
kota, for the past 8V2 years. On Sep- 
tember 10, 1%9, he moved to Buf- 
falo to become medical director of 



55 



Westwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc. He 
is "truly looking forward to this new 
venture" and hopes "to be able to 
see more of his classmates in his 
new position." 

JAIVIES C. PARKE, JR. (Charlotte Me- 
morial Hospital, Charlotte, N. C. 
28201) had accepted a full-time po- 
sition as associate chairman of the 
Department of Pediatrics at Char- 
lotte Memorial Hospital. This de- 
partment is affiliated with the De- 
partment of Pediatrics at UNC as 
part of the senior elective program. 

Jim is a clinical assistant professor 
of pediatrics at the UNC School of 
Medicine and visits the Pediatric 
Neurology Clinic once a month. He 
and his wife, Rachel, have three chil- 
dren (Jeanette, David, and Charles). 

C. T. (Neil) PARTRICK (615 E. 12th 
St., Washington, N. C. 27889) who 
began a six-year term on the State 
Board of Medical Examiners in No- 
vember, 1968, spent a two-week sab- 
batical at NCMH in October. 

WILLIAM M. VINSON (1190 Mont- 
gomery Dr., Santa Rosa, Calif. 95405) 
is engaged in the private practice of 
internal medicine, with particular in- 
terest in hematology and allergy. He 
became Board-certified in 1962. 

William and his wife, the former 
Ruth Myatt (Duke '52) have two 
sons: Bill, 11, and Tim, 7. His hob- 
bies include golf, sailing, bike-rid- 
ing, and Little League supervision. 



1955 

WALTER E. DEYTON (152 Confed- 
erate Ave., Danville, Va. 24541) is 
practicing radiology in Danville in 
association with three other radiolo- 
gists, one of whom joins him in as- 
sisting with the teaching of clinical 
radiology at the UNC School of 
Medicine. He attends most of the 
joint UNC-Duke radiology confer- 
ences held during the academic 
year. 

Walter is married to the former Anne 
Cobb, who had been a nurse on the 
OB-GYN service at N.C. Memorial 
Hospital. They have three children: 
Teresa L., 13 ("horse-crazy, junior 
high"), Thomas M. (Tom), 11 "Little 



League baseball, etc.") and Cheryl 
E., 7 ("active in all ways but most 
successful in trying to outdo older 
brother and sister"). Walter's cur- 
rent avocation is trying to design and 
build a new home. 

COUNCIL DUDLEY (320 Ivy Circle, 
Elkin, N. C. 28621) is still a resident 
in pathology at the North Carolina 
Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem. 

PRESLEY Z. DUNN, JR. (Suite 101, 
301 Miller St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
27103) joined Pediatric Associates in 
Winston-Salem on April 1, 1968, after 
eight years of solo pediatric practice 
in Statesville. 

Presley and his wife, Mary Anna, 
have five children, including an 
adopted six-year-old daughter. 

JOHN W. FOUST (Providence Medi- 
cal Center, 1850 E. Third St., Char- 
lotte, N. C. 28211) is chief of the 
Department of Otolaryngology at 
Charlotte Memorial Hospital and 
vice president of the medical staff 
of Presbyterian Hospital. This year 
he is to become chief of the medi- 
cal staff of this hospital. He was 
elected a fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons in 1968. 

JOHN T. MONROE, JR. has his pri- 
vate office in the Medical Arts Build- 
ing, Suite 7, 891 W. Willow Drive, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 

C. WILLIAM ROGERS (Grampian 
Hills, Madisonville, Ky. 42431) is 
practicing radiology with a multi- 
specialty group clinic and hospital 
in western Kentucy. Before locating 
in Kentucky, he spent several years 
in the Navy. 

He and his wife, Marianne, have 
four boys, ages 14, 12, 11, and 6. He 
spends what little free time he may 
have at boating and water sports, 
gardening and skiing. 

Bill visited Chapel Hill two years 
ago and "got lost in the parking lot." 

WILLIAM H. WHITE, JR. (1100 Vine 
St., Gainesville, Ga. 30501) is prac- 
ticing obstetrics and gynecology in 
a three-man group. 

He and his wife, Frances, have three 
children: Will, 13, Steve, 12; and 



Todd, 6. Both Bill and his wife play 
tennis, and he occasionally plays 
golf and attempts to water-ski. 

W. WALLACE WHITE (6052 Ropes 
Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio 45244) is prac- 
ticing radiology at Christ Hospital in 
Cincinnati and in his private office. 
He is a diplomate of the American 
Board of Radiology. 

The Whites have two children, ages 
11 and 4. While admitting to be a 
poor golfer, Wally dares to challenge 
any of his classmates in handball. 



1956 

JOHN T. EVANS (Medical Towers, 
Suite 102, Chattanooga, Tenn. 37403) 
has been engaged in a partnership 
practice of otolaryngology since 
July, 1960. He is a diplomate of the. 
American Board of Otolaryngology, 
a member of the American Academy 
of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngolo- 
gy, and a fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons. 

John and his wife, Jeanne, have 
three daughters: Jennifer Lee, 13; 
Candace Barrett, 11; and Alison 
Moore, 8. 

WILLIAM C. IVEY (Route 1, Snow 
Camp, N. C. 27349) is in general 
practice and operates the Ivey 
Clinic in Saxapahaw. 

CLIFTON G. PAYNE (1872 Pennrose 
Dr., Reidsville, N. C. 27320) is prac- 
ticing in association with Irvin Rich- 
ardson ('55). 

Kip and his wife have three children, 
ages 11, 8 and 1. The Paynes are 
part owners of a cottage at Fort Cas- 
well Beach, where they spend as 
much time as possible. 



1957 

ROBERT S. CLINE (205 Hillcrest Dr., 
Sanford, N. C. 27330) and his wife 
had their fourth child, Anna Caro- 
line, on March 23, 1969. 

JOEL D. CONNER (2608 Armstrong 
Pk. Rd., Gastonia, N. C. 28052) is 
practicing obstetrics and gynecology 
in partnership with Robert Groves 
and Robert Ogden. He is now a 



56 



diplomate of the American Society 
of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is 
the father of four children. 

WILLIAM P. CORNELL (6227 E. Josh- 
ua Tree Lane, Scottsdale, Ariz. 
85251) is practicing general and 
thoracic surgery in a private hos- 
pital in Phoenix, Ariz. In February 
1969 he performed the first kidney 
transplantation in that state. 

GORDON C. CROWELL {Route 4, Box 
729, Lincolnton, N. C.) has been 
practicing internal medicine in Lin- 
colnton since he finished his medi- 
cal residency six years ago. 

The Crowells have four children. 
They are building a new home that 
will include a handball court and 
that should be finished this year. 

ERIC L. FEARRINGTON (2 Medical 
Pavilion, Greenville, N. C. 27834) has 
practiced internal medicine and 
cardiology in Greenville for six years 
in partnership with C. H. "Skip" 
Rand, Jr. ('61). He is now serving 
as director of the Coastal Plains 
Rheumatic Fever Clinic and as a 
regional medical consultant for the 
Department of Vocational Rehabili- 
tation. He is a diplomate of the 
American Board of Internal Medi- 
cine and a fellow of the American 
College of Physicians and the Ameri- 
can College of Cardiology. He has 
published articles on myotonia, my- 
xedema, and Whipple's disease. 

Eric and his wife, Delores, have two 
boys, 8 and 11, and one daughter, 5. 

H. MAXWELL MORRISON, JR. (Box 
720, Southern Pines, N. C. 28387) 
has been practicing ophthalmology 
at the Pinehurst Medical Center in 
Pinehurst for six years and is a part- 
time clinical instructor in ophthal- 
mology at UNC. He was elected to 
fellowship in the American College 
of Surgeons in 1968, and this year 
served as president of the Moore 
County Medical Society in 1969. 

His wife, Myrtis, is president of the 
Moore County Medical Auxiliary. 
They live in Southern Pines and 
have three girls: Mary Anne, 8; Eliza- 
beth, 5; and Jean, 3. 



1958 

JOHN I. BROOKS, JR. (Tarboro Clin- 
ic, Tarboro, N. C. 27886) has been 
practicing internal medicine at the 
Tarboro Clinic since 1964. 

ALLEN R. KOENIG (78 Dandy Drive, 
Cos Cob, Conn. 06830) is senior at- 
tending anesthesiologist at Green- 
wich Hospital in Greenwich, Conn. 
He is active in Scouting and Little 
League baseball and is a Town Meet- 
ing representative. 

Al and his wife have four children: 
Lora, 11; Bob, 9; Kathryn, 5; and 
Allison, 2. 

ADDISON G. MANGUM (Albemarle, 
N. C. 28001) is a radiologist at the 
Stanly County Hospital in Albemarle. 



1959 

WILFRED D. LITTLE, JR. (7914 West 
Hiawatha St., Tampa, Fla. 33615) 
served his internship and medical 
residency at Tampa General Hospital 
and spent four years in U. S. Public 
Health Service hospitals in Seattle, 
Wash., and Staten Island, N. Y. After 
completing his dermatology residen- 
cy at the latter, he served a one-year 
fellowship in dermatology at Colum- 
bia-Presbyterian Medical Center be- 
fore returning in 1966, to the USPHS 
Hospital at Staten Island as assistant 
chief of dermatology and chief of 
allergy. During that year he took 
concurrent training in allergy at 
Roosevelt Hospital. In 1967 he joined 
the staff of the Wilson and Little 
Skin and Cancer Center, P.A., in 
Tampa, and has remained there 
until the present. 




Will and his wife, Sally, have two 
children (Duff, 9 and Mike, 7) and 
a poodle named Chan ("short for 



Chanel No. 5"). His hobbies are 
boating, fishing, and flying. 

W. RUSSELL ROWLAND (Baptist 
Hospital, Mbeya, Tanzania) and his 
wife Betty, both former students at 
the New Orleans Baptist Seminary, 
were appointed missionaries to Tan- 
zania last summer. Russell, a lieu- 
tenant colonel in the U. S. Army, 
resigned effective September 1st as 
chief of the department of medicine, 
U. S. Army Hospital, Specialized 
Treatment Center (Fort Gordon, Ga.) 
to accept the mission and join the 
staff of the Baptist hospital in Mbe- 
ya. He was also assistant clinical 
professor of medicine in the Medical 
College of Georgia. 

EDWIN L. STEWART (420 Pinellas 
St., Clearwater, Fla. 33156) is en- 
gaged in the private practice of neu- 
rology. 

CHARLES E. TRADO (Box 726, But- 
ner, N. C. 27509) completed a rotat- 
ing internship at Watts Hospital in 
Durham in 1960 and did six years of 
general practice in Hickory before 
beginning residency training in psy- 
chiatry at John Umstead Hospital at 
Butner. After completing his three- 
year residency in December, 1969, he 
returned to Hickory to join the staff 
of Broughton Hospital and to work 
in the mental health center in Hick- 
ory, in addition to carrying on a 
limited private practice of psychia- 
try. Charles is married to the for- 
mer Naomi Wood of Louisburg, N. 
C, and they have four children: 
Charlotte, 15; Melanie, 11, Chuck, 
91/2; and Tony, 8V2. 

1960 

L GORDON KIRSCHNER (3421 Gar- 
rison St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
20008) has left the University of Vir- 
ginia, where he was an assistant pro- 
fessor in the Department of Psychia- 
try, to enter the private practice of 
psychoanalysis and psychotherapy 
in Washington. He is a candidate in 
the Washington Psychoanalytic In- 
stitute, in advanced standing in the 
adult program and second year in 
the child analytic program, 

Gordon and his wife, Catherine, have 
four daughters, ranging in age from 
2 to 16 years. 



57 



ARVID C. SIEBER (Seth Low Moun- 
tain Rd., Ridgefield, Conn. 06877) 
continues as medical director of the 
Olin Corporation. 

After four sons (Steven, 8; Michael, 
6; James, 4; Christopher, 2) he and 
his wife Helen "finally had a daugh- 
ter, Ellen-Marie, on August 8, 1969." 

G. THOMAS STRICKLAND (Naval 
Medical Research Unit 2, Box 14, 
APO San Francisco, Calif. 96263), a 
commander in the Navy, is still in 
Taiwan as head of NAMRU's Depart- 
ment of Clinical Investigation in 
Taipei, but plans to return to Bethes- 
da in July "after three exciting years 
in Taipei and Southeast Asia." Tom's 
wife, Anne, and their three boys 
(George, 6; Paul, 5; and Kelly, 4) have 
been with him. He is a diplomate of 
the American Board of Internal Medi- 
cine and an associate member of 
the American College of Physicians. 

P. BURT VEAZEY (4406 Westwood 
Lane, Sarasota, Fla. 33579) is doing 
group practice in internal medicine 
and cardiology. 

The Veazey's have three children — 
two boys and a girl. 



1961 

C. DONIVAN BESSINGER, JR. 
(Greenville Medical Center BIdg., 24 
Vardry St., Greenville, S. C. 29601) 
has begun the solo practice of gen- 
eral surgery in Greenville, after com- 
pleting his residency training at 
Greenville General Hospital on June 
30. 

The Bessinger's first child, Marshall 
Donivan, was born January 28, 1969. 

JAMES H. BLAIR (8 Holly Tree Ct., 
Columbia, S. C. 29204) practiced 
obstetrics and gynecology in north- 
east Georgia for two years, but has 
recently moved to Columbia to be- 
come associated with a group of ob- 
stetricians in that city. 

He and his wife, Margaret, have a 
new son, making two boys and one 
girl. 

H. DAVID BRUTON (365 S. Ridge St., 
Southern Pines, N. C. 28387) became 
a fellow of the American Academy 



of Pediatrics in May, 1969. He is a 
director of the Sandhills Area Cham- 
ber of Commerce and a member of 
the Moore County Board of Educa- 
tion and the N. C. Task Force for 
Education. His hobby is golf, and he 
writes that his handicap is falling 
rapidly. 

JOHN C. GRAHAM, JR. (803 Emory 
Dr., Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514) has 
completed two years of a residency 
in radiology at Riverside Hospital in 
Newport News, Va., and has returned 
to Chapel Hill to complete his resi- 
dency in diagnostic radiology at 
NCMH. His special interest is in 
vascular radiology. 

CLAUD M. GRIGG (2427 Westfield 
Rd., Charlotte, N. C. 28207) became 
certified in internal medicine in Jan- 
uary, 1969. 

The Griggs' third child, Katherine, 
was born on May 23, 1969. 



1962 

OSCAR H. BOLCH, JR. (5000 W. 57 
Terr., Shawnee Mission, Kansas 
66205) is a third year resident in 
obstetrics and gynecology at the 
University of Kansas Medical Center 
in Kansas City. 

MARION WILSON GRIFFIN (936 Wal- 
ton Court, Asheboro, N. C. 27203) has 
recently entered private practice in 
Asheboro, in association with two 
other general surgeons. 

H. GERARD HARTZOG (4516 Gates 
St., Raleigh, N. C. 27609) spent a 
year in Vietnam aboard a hospital 
ship, the USS Sanctuary. After six 
months at Camp Lejeune Naval Hos- 
pital, he was released from service 
and in July, 1969, began the private 
practice of general surgery in Ra- 
leigh. 

EDWARD McG. HEDGPETH, JR. 
(2429 Perkins Rd., Durham, N. C. 
27706) finished his residency in 
ophthalmology at the New York Hos- 
pital-Cornell Medical Center in June, 
1968, then spent a year as a Heed 
Ophthalmic Foundation Fellow. On 
July 1, 1969, he began the practice 
of ophthalmology at McPherson Hos- 
pital in Durham. 



CHARLES M. HICKS (1822 Glen 
Meade Road, Wilmington, N. C. 
28401) is practicing pediatrics in 
partnership with Wilbur P. Matthews 
('61). His home address is 1163 
Country Club Road, Wilmington, 
N. C. 28401. 

J. NEWTON MacCORMACK (4708 
Quail Hollow Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 
27609) received his M.P.H. degree 
from the UNC School of Public 
Health in 1968, after having served 
two years as assistant health director 
for the District Health Department 
in Chapel Hill. He is now with the 
State Board of Health working in 
Communicable Disease Control and 
Accident Prevention. 

Newt and his wife. Amy, have two 
children: Kathy and Forrest. 

WILLIAM R. PITSER (1344 Westmore- 
land Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 13210) has 
completed his residency in otorhin- 
olaryngology at Upstate Medical 
Center in Syracuse. He is spending 
this year (1969-70) as a fellow of the 
National Institutes of Health before 
entering practice. 

JAMES P. PITTMAN (106 Forest 
Lane, San Rafael, Calif. 94903), after 
four years of postgraduate training 
in internal medicine at the Medical 
College of Georgia, served two years 
in the Air Force at Malmstrom Air 
Force Base, Montana. He is now a 
trainee in gastroenterology at the 
University of California Medical Cen- 
ter in San Francisco. When his 
traineeship is completed (in July, 
1970), he plans to enter private prac- 
tice. 

Pat was married in 1963. He and his 
wife, Patricia, had their first baby 
in July, 1969. 

HENRY C. TURNER (901 Carolina 
Ave., Winston-Salem, N. C.) is a staff 
anesthesiologist at the N. C. Baptist 
Hospital and the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine. In May he mar- 
ried the former Jane Richardson, an 
anesthetist at the Baptist Hospital. 

1963 

QUINCY ADAMS AYSCUE (209 Medi- 
cal Tower, Norfolk, Va. 23507) is en- 
gaged in the private practice of an- 



58 



esthesiology with the firm of Julius 
J. Snyder, M.D., and Associates. 

Quincy has a daughter, Ann Douglas, 
5, and a son, Quincy Jr., born April 
17, 1969. The Ayscues' home address 
is 944 Larchmont Crescent, Norfolk, 
Va. 23508. 

J. ANDREW BURNHAM (USS Repose 
AH-16, FPO San Francisco 96601) 
completed his residency in otolarn- 
gology at Duke in 1968 and entered 
the Navy for a two-year tour of duty. 
He spent the first six months at the 
U.S. Naval Hospital in San Diego 
and is now a lieutenant commander 
assigned to the USS Repose, one of 
the Navy's two hospital ships serving 
the I Corps in Vietnam. He writes, 
"It is an extremely busy but inter- 
esting job, my time being divided 
between the care of acute injuries 
of head and neck, routine clinical 
practice, and elective surgery on 
GIs and Vietnamese." After complet- 
ing his Navy service, he expects to 
go into private practice. 

Andy's wife, Gloria, and his son, 
Mark, are living in San Diego. 




In the picture above, Andy and Evin 
H. Sides ('65) are shown on the 
Repose as the ship was departing 
from Subic Bay in the Philippines. 
Evin is spending a year with the 
Army in Vietnam and was on the 
ship for a four-week stint of tempo- 
rary duty. 

I. KELMAN COHEN (550 N. Broad- 
way, Baltimore, Md. 21205) is chief 
resident in plastic surgery at Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. He expects to 
enter the service when he finishes 
his residency training, "and then 
hunt for an exciting job in aca- 
demia." 



Kel states that his "whole clan 
misses Chapel Hill, which we really 
think of as home." 

CHARLES L COOKE (Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia Hospital, 1200 E. 
Broad St., Richmond, Va. 23219) 
finished his medical residency in 
August and is remaining at the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia as instructor 
in medicine. 

DAVE M. DAVIS (Parkwood Hospital, 
Inc., 1999 Cliff Valley Way, N.E., At- 
lanta, Ga. 30329) has finished his 
residency in psychiatry and is now 
medical director of Parkwood Hos- 
pital in Atlanta. He "recently went 
flying with Buzz Sawyer ('63) in his 
new Beechcraft Bonanza." 

WILLIAM B. DEAL (1772 S.W. 36th 
Place, Gainesville, Fla. 32601) com- 
pleted a fellowship in infectious dis- 
eases last June and is now chief 
resident and instructor, in the De- 
partment of Medicine, University of 
Florida School of Medicine. 

BENJAMIN E. DUNLAP (340 Earl- 
wood Rd., Statesville, N. C. 28677) 
is doing family practice as a mem- 
ber of a group at Davis Hospital in 
Statesville. 

The Dunlaps have two children: 
Benjie, 7, and Anne, 5. 

CLARENCE A. DUNN, JR. (345 West 
58th St., New York, N. Y. 10019) com- 
pleted his orthopedic residency on 
July 1, 1969, and immediately opened 
an office for private practice. He is 
on the staff of St. Luke's Hospital 
and Roosevelt Hospital in New York. 
Clarence is married to the former 
Alice Kovar, and they have two chil- 
dren (Hilarry, 4, and Clarence III, 1). 

JOHN MICHAEL GALLAGHER (1001 
Broadway, 319 Northwest Medical 
Center, Seattle, Wash. 98100) com- 
pleted his tour of duty in the Air 
Force at Sheppard Air Force Base, 
Texas, last summer and returned to 
Seattle, where he has an office for 
the private practice of general psy- 
chiatry. He is also a clinical instruc- 
tor in the Department of Psychiatry 
of the University of Washington 
School of Medicine" and director of 
the Partial Hospitalization Program 



of the Seattle Mental Health Insti- 
tute. His home address is 3546 120th 
Ave., S.E., Bellevue, Wash. 98004. 

DAVID W. SILLMON (3752 Brisban 
St., Harrisburg, Pa. 17111) is prac- 
ticing internal medicine at the Har- 
risburg Hospital for one year. 

He and his wife, Gertrude, have three 
children: Sandra, 6; Rebecca, 4; and 
David, Jr., 2. 

ROY A. WEAVER (1614 Brisbane St., 
Silver Spring, Md. 20902) completed 
residency training in pathology at 
UNC under Dr. K. M. Brinkhous in 
July, 1968, and is now a major in 
the Army Medical Corps. He is as- 
signed to the hematologic and lym- 
phatic branch of the Armed Forces 
Institute of Pathology, Walter Reed 
Army Medical Center in Washington, 
D. C. He expects to complete his 
tour of duty in August, 1970. 

Roy's wife, Anita, and their two chil- 
dren (Gail, 7, and Mike, 5) are with 
him in Silver Spring. 

DAVID R. WILLIAMS (Southgate 
Shopping Center, Thomasviile, N. C. 
27360) has been practicing pedi- 
atrics in Thomasviile for more than 
a year and recently moved into a 
new office in the Southgate Shop- 
ping Center. Last July, he formed a 
partnership with CHARLES F. GIL- 
LIAM ('50) for pediatric practice. 

"Things are going well," with David, 
his wife, Jane, and their three chil- 
dren. 



1964 

BRUCE H. BERRYHILL (3935 Merri- 
fieids Blvd., Portsmouth, Va. 23703) 
began a two-year tour of duty in the 
Navy after finishing his residency 
in otolaryngology at Washington 
University-Barnes Hospital in St. 
Louis. He is assigned to the Naval 
Hospital in Portsmouth. 

Bruce and his wife, Joan, have two 
girls, Julie and Jane, ages 3 and 2. 

JAMES F. EARNHARDT completed a 
pediatric internship and residency at 
Babies' and Children's Division of 
University Hospitals of Cleveland, 
Western Reserve University, before 
serving two years as pediatrician at 



59 



the U. S. Army Hospital in Camp 
Zama, Japan. In March, 1969, he was 
certified by the American Board of 
Pediatrics. After his discharge from 
the Army in July, 1969, he entered 
the private practice of pediatrics in 
Winston-Salem. 

John and his wife have had two 
children, both boys, since leaving 
Chapel Hill. Their ages are 4 and 2. 

GEORGE PATRICK HENDERSON, JR. 
(Department of Otolaryngology, Mun- 
son Army Hospital, Ft. Leavenworth, 
Kansas 66027) entered the Army in 
July, after completing a residency 
in otolaryngology at Duke. 

The Hendersons were expecting 
their third child in September. 

J I MM IE ISAAC NEWTON (149 Sur- 
tees Rd., Winston-Salem, N. C. 27104) 




served a mixed OB-Gyn internship 
at Grady Memorial Hospital before 
beginning three years of military 
duty as a naval flight surgeon, in- 
cluding 13 months in DaNang, Viet- 
nam, with a Marine reconnaissance 
squadron. He is now in the second 
year of a four-year OB-Gyn residency 
at the Bowman Gray School of Medi- 
cine. 

Jimmie and his wife, Sue, have two 
daughters (Kelly, 4, and Jill, 1). He 
plans to enter private practice in 
North Carolina after completing his 
residency. 

JAMES W. ROSE (204-B Jupiter, 
Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas 
76311). At the time he wrote last 
summer, the temperature at Shep- 
pard Air Force Base had been above 
lOO'F for 31 consecutive days. He 
is looking forward to completing his 
tour of duty with the Air Force this 



year and to settling somewhere else 
to practice internal medicine. 

Jim and his wife have two children. 

WAYNE B. VENTERS (3018 Devon 
Rd., Durham, N. C. 27707) is now in 
the second year of his orthopedic 
residency at Duke, which he calls 
"a very fine program." 

As a Father's Day gift in 1969 his 
wife, Carol, presented him with their 
first child, a girl whom they named 
Lara. 



1965 

ROBERT T. KINDLEY (U. S. Air Force 
Hosp., Elgin, Fla. 32542) is serving a 
tour of duty in the Air Force and is 
stationed at Elgin Air Force Base 
in Florida. He plans to enter private 
practice in July. 

WILLIAM CLEVELAND LANGDON 
(TUSLOG DET 37, APO N. Y. 09254) 
is serving for two years in Ankara, 
Turkey, as an obstetrician and gyne- 
cologist with the U. S. Air Force. His 
wife, Ruth Anna, and their daugh- 
ters, Annah and Candace, are with 
him. 

Bill writes that his four years at the 
Medical College of Virginia were re- 
warding and that he plans to return 
to North Carolina. 

H. WAYNE MAYHUE (3120 Pomeroy 
Drive, Louisville, Ky. 40220) is serv- 
ing the second year of an Ob-Gyn 
residency at the University of Louis- 
ville School of Medicine. In Septem- 
ber he "presented a paper to the 
Ob-Gyn Society (5th district conven- 
tion in Niagara Falls) and won third 
prize of $100." 

Wayne and his wife, Judith, have one 
daughter, Kristy, who will be 2 yrs. 
old in July. They are enjoying their 
new home, but he misses "those 
lovely U.S.A. F. hours and pay." 

WILLIAMSON B. STRUM (125 Flor- 
ence Rd., Branford, Conn. 06405) has 
completed the second year of a gas- 
troenterology fellowship at Yale Uni- 
versity and plans to join the Air 
Force in July for two years of serv- 
ice. 



His wife, Faye, is teaching perceptu- 
ally handicapped children in the 
public school system. They "have 
no children but have a new Peking- 
ese named Tums." 



1966 

JAMES CURTIS ABELL (Kingsley 
Field, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601) 
received — after three years of post- 
graduate studies— the first family- 
practice residency certificate 
awarded by the University of Ken- 
tucky Medical Center. He is now 
serving a tour of duty in the Air 
Force and is stationed at Kingsley 
Field, Oregon. 

He and his wife, the former Patsy 
Bost (UNC '65, B.S. in physical thera- 
py) were expecting their first child 
in January. 

WILLIAM M. CRUTCHFIELD (NC 
Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill, 
N. C. 27514) just completed two 
years of active duty in the Air Force 
as a flight surgeon. Although he was 
stationed at Davis Monthan Air Force 
Base in Tucson, Arizona, he also 
served in Vietnam, Alaska, and Oki- 
nawa. He returned to Chapel Hill 
last July for an ENT residency at 
NCMH. 

N. PARKE DAVIS, II (c/o George D. 
Davis, Route 1, Jamestown, N. C. 
27282) completed the second year 
of a general surgery residency at 
the University of Kentucky in Lex- 
ington on July 1, 1969. This year he 
is serving as a fellow at Birmingham 
General Hospital in Birmingham, 
England. 

CYRUS L GRAY, 111 (Geisinger Medi- 
cal Clinic, Danville, Pa. 17821) was 
discharged from the Air Force in 
September and has begun a resi- 
dency in obstetrics and gynecology 
at Geisinger Medical Center, where 
he served his internship in 1966-67. 
While in service, he was stationed 
at Patrick Air Force Base in Florida, 
and divided his time between the 
Ob-Gyn service and the general 
practice clinic at the 6550th USAF 
Hospital. 

HOWARD T. HINSHAW (2743 Cart- 
wright Circle, Irving, Texas 75060) 
began his residency in medicine at 



60 



Parkland Hospital in Dallas on July 
1. He and his wife, Virginia, have 
two daughters (Beth, 2, and Karen, 
1). 

ROY V. LAND, JR. (Laboratory Serv- 
ice, Box 22, U. S. Army General Hos- 
pital, Frankfurt, APO New York 
09757) has spent his three years of 
Army service in Europe and expects 
to complete his residency in pa- 
thology in the fall of 1970. 

His wife Emily and their children 
(Leslie, 7, and Thomas, 3) have been 
with him during his tour of duty. 
Roy writes that several alumni are in 
the area, including Tom Pressin and 
Dave Hefelfinger ('65), Bob Sevier 
('66), and Fuller Hunnicutt and Don 
McQueen {'67). 

SURRY P. ROBERTS. Excerpts from 
the Carteret County News Times, 
June 19, 1969: ". . . has joined the 
staff of the Sea Level General and 
Children's Hospital ... He will be 
associated in general practice with 
Dr. Ted Best ['59] and Dr. John Kin- 
dell in the Sea Level Clinic." After 
graduation he ". . . joined the U.S. 
Army. After completing a rotating 
internship at Tripler General Hos- 
pital, Honolulu, Haw., he volunteer- 
ed for the airborne and served at Ft. 
Bragg and Hue Phu Bai in Vietnam 
. . . He extended twice his duty in 
Vietnam with the 5th Special Forces 
Group at Pleiku, treating mostly 
Vietnamese and Montagnard casual- 
ties ... He was awarded the Combat 
Medical badge. Bronze Star, Viet- 
namese Honor Medal, Vietnam Serv- 
ice Medal and jump wings . . ." 

ELLIOTT W. STEVENS, JR. (Duke 
University Medical Center, Durham, 
N. C. 27706) was discharged from 
the Air Force on September 14, and 
he and his wife, Blanche, came to 
Durham. Walker has a residency in 
internal medicine and a fellowship 
in pulmonary disease and allergy at 
Duke University Medical Center. 

DONALD ANTON THOMAS (722 Fifth 
Ave. West, Hendersonville, N. C. 
28739) finished his pediatric resi- 
dency at the City of Memphis Hos- 
pitals in Memphis, Tenn., on June 
30 and entered the private practice 
of pediatrics with Dr. Fletcher Rai- 
ford in Hendersonville on August 1. 



Donald and his family (wife Norma 
and daughter Sheryl) live at 1604 
Sherman Drive in Hendersonville. 
When he wrote they were expecting 
their second child. 

W. BEVERLY TUCKER (412 Tinker- 
bell Rd., Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514) 
was discharged from the Air Force 
in September, after spending two 
years at Sheppard Air Force Base, 
Texas. He is now beginning a two- 
year family practice residency at 
NCMH. 

Bev and his wife, Anne, have one 
son, Bev, Jr., who is now 2 years old. 

JAMES H. WHICKER (Tinker Air 
Force Base, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
73145) is assigned to the otolaryn- 
gology clinic at Tinker Air Force 
Base. During his tour of duty in the 
Air Force, he has had the opportuni- 
ty to travel to Hawaii, Okinawa, Ja- 
pan, Taiwan, Philippines, and Alas- 
ka. He expects to continue his train- 
ing in otolaryngology at the Mayo 
Clinic when he is discharged in July, 
1970. 

He and his wife, Rebecca, have a 3- 
year-old daughter, Carmen. 

1967 

HANS J. ARNDT (2378 Rousseau, La 
Salle, Montreal, Canada) is a rest- 
dent in the diploma course in psy- 
chiatry at McGill University— a four- 
year program. This year he is senior 
assistant resident at the Day Hos- 
pital at the Royal Victoria Hospital, 
apparently the oldest psychiatric day 
hospital. 

Last May — for the first time in three 
years — Hans, his wife and son went 
back to their home town (Berlin, 
Germany) for three weeks. They 
realized "that HOME for us is defi- 
nitely on this side of the Atlantic." 

GERALD W. BLAKE wrote that since 
October, 1958 he had been serving 
as battalion surgeon for an infantry 
unit in northern South Vietnam, with 
the rank of captain. The medical 
problems he had seen so far were 
"not too interesting — impetigo, back- 
aches, sore throats, minor wounds." 
At the time he was hoping to be 
transferred to a hospital for his last 
four months in that country and then 
return to U. S. 



THOMAS W. BUNDY (1527B Seventh 
St., BIytheville AFB, Ark. 72315) will 
complete his tour of duty with the 
Air Force in August, 1970. He and 
his wife, Peggy "are looking forward 
to returning to the Geisinger Medi- 
cal Center, Danville, Pa." for his 
residency in obstetrics and gyne- 
cology. 

JOHN L. CURRIE (4628 Hazel Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19143) began the 
second year of his Ob-Gyn residency 
at the University of Pennsylvania 
last July. 

DAVID A. EVANS (3501-H Beacon 
Hill, Winston-Salem, N. C. 27106) is 
in the second year of "an enjoyable 
Ob-Gyn residency program at Bow- 
man Gray Medical Center." 

His wife, Lona, is on the faculty of 
the Baptist Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing. 

M. WAYNE FLYE (1578 Belmar Rd., 
Cleveland, Ohio 44118) was in the 
second year of a surgical residency 
at the University Hospitals of Cleve- 
land. In February he went to Duke 
University to work with Dr. D. B. 
Amos. 

Wayne wrote that he and his wife, 
Phyllis, were expecting their first 
child in December. 

JERRY W. GREENE was serving as 
flight surgeon with the 510th Tactical 
Fighter Squadron in Bien Hoa, Viet- 
nam, at the time he wrote. He said 
that he hoped to have 100 combat 
missions in F-lOO fighter jets by the 
time he left for Wiesbaden, Germany, 
in October. After finishing his Air 
Force commitment, Jerry plans to 
take a residency in neurology and 
psychiatry. 

E. FRANKLIN HART, JR. took his in- 
ternship at the University of Ken- 
tucky Medical Center before being 
commissioned in the Air Force — but 
attached to the Army, and sent to 
Vietnam. During his first six months 
there, he served as a battalion sur- 
geon with the 25th Infantry Division 
(a few miles from Cambodia) work- 
ing out of an armored personnel 
carrier which served as home and 
aid station. At the time he wrote he 
had been transferred to the 74th 



61 



Field Hospital, a 240-bed POW hos- 
pital staffed with five doctors. "Our 




work ranges from minor debride- 
ments and amputations to abdomi- 
nal-peroneal resections, femoral 
artery grafts, and separation of one 
carotid A-V fistula." 

Franklin expected to leave Vietnam 
last October and, after one more 
year in the Air Force, hopes to re- 
turn to UNO to enter the ENT pro- 
gram. 

JAMES D. HUNDLEY (46 Hayes 
Road, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514) com- 
pleted his internship in surgery 
(Florida) and a year of orthopedic 
residency at NCMH. He is currently 
working as a postdoctoral fellow in 
the UNC Department of Pharmacol- 
ogy, where he is engaged in research 
on parathyroid hormone and thyro- 
calcitonin. 

LINDA HALL JACKSON (10391 Luke 
St., El Paso, Texas 79908) is still 
working in the clinic of Thomason 
General Hospital, the city-county 
hospital in El Paso, where "most of 
the patients are Mexican Americans 
and many of the cases are fascinat- 
ing." Her husband, Howard, is a first 
lieutenant in the Air Defense Ar- 
tillery at Fort Bliss. His tour of duty 
will be completed in March, 1970, 
and they are trying to find a univer- 
sity where he can work on a Ph.D. in 
immunology and Linda on a child 
psychiatry residency. 

JAMES N. McLAMB (Medical De- 
partment, MCAF, FPO Seattle, Wash. 
98772) graduated from the School 
of Aviation Medicine in Pensacola, 
Florida, in April, 1969, and is now 
station flight surgeon and senior 
medical officer at the Marine Corps 
Air Facility in Futema, Okinawa. 



He married Ann Marie Boley of An- 
nandale, Va., in October, 1968. They 
have an infant son, Michael Andrew, 
whom he hasn't yet seen. 

JOSEPH TIMOTHY McLAMB (Reese 
Air Force Base Hospital, Lubbock, 
Texas) went on active duty with the 
Air Force in September, after com- 
pleting the first year of a surgery 
residency at Vanderbilt. He "en- 
joyed having Dr. Womack last spring 
at Vanderbilt for a lecture." 

JAMES MICHAEL MORTON (910 
Hanover St., Aurora, Col. 80010) is 
serving the second year of his pe- 
diatric residency at Fitzsimons Gen- 
eral Hospital and is finding Army 
life "kind of exciting ... It is espe- 
cially nice to be able to treat a child 
with all the latest equipment and 
chemotherapy and not have to worry 
about cost to parents." 

The Mortons have two children, Tani 
(2V2) and Molly (1) and a dog, LuAnn 
who is being taught to hunt doves 
and ducks. 

BRUCE A. PHILLIPS, JR. (126 Green 
Briar Rd., Lexington, Ky. 45003) has 
completed a rotating internship and 
one year of a family-practice resi- 
dency. He is now serving as a resi- 
dent in internal medicine at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Medical Center 
in Lexington. He expects to enter 
the Army in 1971. 

Bruce writes that he and his wife, 
Nancy, are enjoying their year-old 
adopted son, Michael Bruce. 

WILLIAM B. RILEY, JR. (National 
Institutes of Health, Building 30, 
Room 230, Bethesda, Md. 20014) is 
serving for two years as research 
associate at NIH, working on col- 
lagen-specific enzymes and wound 
healing. 

The Rileys' first child, a daughter 
named Heather Joy, was born on 
April 11, 1969. They live at 5401 Brad- 
ley Blvd., Bethesda, Md. 20014. 

ALBERT L. ROPER, II (5437 Pire 
Ave., San Diego, Calif. 92122) is a 
lieutenant commander in the Navy 
and a second-year resident in oto- 
laryngology. His phone number is 
714-453-0765, and he "will be glad 



to talk or write to anyone concern- 
ing (1) Navy, (2) ENT, (3) San Diego." 

JOEL ROTHERMEL (345 W. 58th St., 
Apt. 7-W, New York, N. Y. 10019) has 
completed a year's residency in 
general surgery at the Roosevelt 
Hospital and began a residency in 
orthopaedics at New York Orthopae- 
dic Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian 
Medical Center, on July 1. His wife, 
the former Connie Davis (at one time 
a graduate student in the Depart- 
ment of Bacteriology and Immunol- 
ogy at UNC) is the supervisor of the 
Medical Bacteriology Laboratories at 
Columbia-Presbyterian. 

They "miss Chapel Hill but find New 
York a most exciting place to live." 

JOE WAYNE TIPPETT (3203 Tawny 
Oak, San Antonio, Texas 78230) is in 
the second year of an orthopedic, 
residency at the University of Texas 
(Betar County Hospital) and plans 
to stay there for his entire residency 
program. 

Joe and his wife— who is chief phys- 
ical therapist at Robert B. Green 
Hospital— have two children: Steph- 
anie Jo, 3, and Joe Wayne, Jr., 1. 

MARVIN DENNIS WACHS finished 
the first year of a general-surgery 
residency at Yale-New Haven Hos- 
pital in the spring and entered the 
Army in August. He is stationed at 
Fort Knox, Kentucky, for on-the-job 
training in orthopedics, and has 
been accepted for an orthopedic 
residency at Yale upon completion 
of his Army tour. 

Dennis and his wife, Irena, have a 
daughter, Chandra Louise, born 
January 2, 1969. They spent some 
time in the Chapel Hill area this 
summer before Dennis began his 
military service. 

BARRY McNElL WELBORNE fin- 
ished "two very rewarding years in 
internal medicine at the University 
of Virginia" and spent three addi- 
tional months as a fellow in cardi- 
ology before beginning active duty 
with the Air Force last September. 
He was tentatively assigned to the 
aerospace program at Eglin Air 
Force Base in Valparaiso, Fla. After 
completing his tour of military duty, 
he plans to specialize in cardiology. 



62 



1968 

ISAAC ALAN CRAIG (N. C. Memorial 
Hospital, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514) 
completed an internship in pathol- 
ogy at Strong Memorial Hospital 
(Rochester, N. Y.) in June and was 
married to Kathryn J. Plants of 
Cuba, N. Y. on the 28th of that 
month. He and his bride had a two- 
day honeymoon in a U-Haul truck 
heading for Chapel Hill, where he 
is first-year resident in pathology. 

JOSEPH W. GRIFFIN, JR. (Box 182, 
Williamston, N. C. 27892) finished his 
internship at University Hospital in 
Columbus, Ohio, on July 1 and went 
to Brooks Air Force Base in San An- 
tonio, Texas, for 10 weeks of train- 
ing in aerospace medicine. After his 
training was completed, he was sent 
to Francis E. Warren Air Force Base 
in Cheyenne, Wyo., where he is serv- 
ing as a flight surgeon. 

Joe's son, Christopher Warren, was 
the first baby born in Columbus in 
1969 (January 1st). He and his 
mother, Diane, appeared on two TV 
news programs and had their pic- 
tures in the daily papers. 

JOHN L KIRKLAND (5447 Birdwood 
Rd., Houston, Texas 77035) and his 
wife, Rebecca (Duke, '68), are both 
pediatric residents at Baylor Univer- 
sity Medical Center. 

JAMES M. NESBITT, JR. (1710 Gar- 
den Terrace, Charlotte, N. C. 28203) 
completed a mixed internship at the 
Medical College of South Carolina in 
June and began a family practice 
residency at Charlotte Memorial 
Hospital on July 1, 1969. 

JOHN L POWELL (Fitzsimons Gen- 
eral Hospital, Denver, Col. 80200) is 
a captain in the Army Medical 
Corps. On July 1, 1969, he com- 
pleted his internship at Tripler Gen- 
eral Hospital in Honolulu, and on 
September he began a three-year 
residency in obstetrics and gyne- 
cology at Fitzsimons General Hos- 
pital. 

John and his wife Caroline have two 
children now, John, 2, and Sarah, 1. 

DAVID M. RUBIN (Columbia Presby- 
terian Hospital, 168th St. and Broad- 



way, New York, N. Y. 10032) is a resi- 
dent in pediatrics at Columbia Pres- 
byterian. He is married. 

VALERIE LEWIS STALLINGS (401-A 
N. Hamilton St., Richmond, Va. 
23221) finished an internship in pe- 
diatrics at the Medical College of 
Virginia and is staying there for 
residency training. 

On April 5, 1969, she was married to 
Lindsey Stallings of LaGrange, N. C. 



HOUSE STAFF 
1955 

JOSEPH D. CORPENING (The Chil- 
dren's Clinic, Salisbury, N. C. 28144) 
is practicing pediatrics in Salisbury 
in association with three other pedi- 
atricians: Bob Tannehill, Wayne 
Koontz, and Thomas K. Carlton, Jr. 
Dr. Carlton, the newest member of 
the group, joined the firm in July. 

1957 

THOMAS A. NOONE (420 Chews 
Landing Rd., Haddonfield, N. J. 
08033) is attending obstetrician and 
gynecologist at Our Lady of Lourdes 
Hospital in Camden, N. J. 

1958 

GERALD J. E. ANSELL (164 Chapin 
St., Binghamton, N. Y. 13905) is prac- 
ticing obstetrics and gynecology in 
association with Drs. Ahearn, Keuter, 
and Moore. He is president of the 
medical staff of Our Lady of Lourdes 
Hospital in Binghamton and vice 
president of the Broome County 
Medical Society. In addition, he is 
chairman of the physicians' section 
of the Broome United Fund Drive 
this year and is a director of the 
state and county chapters of the 
American Cancer Society. He is a 
diplomate of the American Board of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology and a 
fellow of the American College of 
Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 

Gerald is married to the former Phyl- 
lis Rich, and they have five children 
— four boys and a girl. 

1959 

HERVY B. KORNEGAY, SR. (515 West 
Main St., Mount Olive, N. C. 28325) 



and his partner Robert Shackelford 
have built a medical complex (of- 
fices for three physicians, a dental 
office, and a pharmacy) in Mount 
Olive. 

Hervy served for two years as a pe- 
diatrician with the U. S. Air Force in 
Japan and has been engaged in pri- 
vate family practice in Mount Olive 
since 1961. He is secretary and im- 
mediate past president of the Mount 
Olive College Area Foundation, and 
chairman of the Committee on 
Christianity and Health for the Pres- 
byterian Synod of North Carolina. 



1961 

MARK V. BARROW (Department of 
Medicine, University of Florida 
School of Medicine, Gainesville, Fla. 
32601) obtained his Ph.D. in teratol- 
ogy in December, 1968, and in July, 
1969, became an assistant professor 
in the Department of Medicine at 
the University of Florida School of 
Medicine. 



1963 

JOHN HAROLD EVANS (Methodist 
Hospital, Texas Medical Center, 
Houston, Texas 77025) assumed his 
duties as assistant professor of pa- 
thology at Baylor University (in the 
Department of Pathology, Methodist 
Hospital, Houston) on August 1, 
1969. 



1964 

BRANCH T. FIELDS, JR. (Wilford 
Hall Hospital, Lackland Air Force 
Base, Texas 78276) completed his 
residency in internal medicine at the 
University of Arkansas Medical Cen- 
ter in 1967 and remained there an- 
other year for a fellowship in infec- 
tious diseases. He is now serving a 
two-year tour in the Infectious Dis- 
ease Section of the Air Force and is 
a member of the staff of Wilford Hall 
Hospital at Lackland Air Force Base. 



1968 

VASILIKI MOSKOS (Department of 
Psychiatry, Fegan 8, Children's Hos- 



63 



pital Medical Center, 300 Longwood 
Ave., Boston, Mass. 02115) began her 
second year of residency in child 
psychiatry in July and made a trip 
to Greece in August. As part of her 
training program, she serves as a 
consulting psychiatrist for the Bos- 



ton Juvenile Court Clinic and other 
agencies. 

Vasiliki's home address is 3 Dana 
St., Apt. 12A, Cambridge, Mass. 
02138. She enjoys living in Boston 
and hopes to remain in that area 
after completing her residency. 



How 


long 


has it been . . 


. ? 










Plan 


to attend 


the 




1970 MEETING OF THE MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 






April 31: 


Class Reunions 








1945 










1920 1925 


1930 


1950 


1960 






1924 1926 


1940 


1955 


1965 






May 1 


: Alumn 


i Day 





ALUMNI NECROLOGY 

JOHN MONTGOMERY ANDREW {'30) 

E. FURMAN ANGEL ('16) 

AULEY McRAE CROUCH ('14) 

HOBART 0. DEATON {'24) 

J. DOUGLAS HARRELL ('56) 

J. RALPH JOHNSON {'30) 

CHARLES CASWELL MASSEY ('21) 

LEONE BURNS NEWELL ('03; 
Raleigh '05) 

EDWIN M. ROBERTSON ('22) 
H. FRANK STARR, SR. {'14) 
HUNTER M. SWEANEY ('17) 
WALTER WATSON ('08) 



ATTENTION, RESIDENTS, INTERNS And SENIOR STUDENTS 

WE HAVE SERVED THE MEDICAL PROFESSION OF NORTH 
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EACH YEAR WE EQUIP MANY PHYSICIANS OFFICES COMPLETE WITH 
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Let us furnish your office when you are ready 

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Phone No. 919-272-5656 



64 




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65 



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66 




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68 



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70 



Do You Know The Answers To The Following Questions? 

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3. Why do more doctors handle their life insurance program with 
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A Unique Inn of a Great University 
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Nii3iina aHJ. 



The University of North Carolina 



School of Medicine and 

Medical Alumni Association Bulletin 




GLUME XVII 



The University of North Carolina 

School of Medicine and 

Medical Alumni Association Bulletin 



Volume XVII, Numbers 2-3 



1970 



EDITOR 

Maria A. Leon 

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE 

Faculty: 

George D. Penick, M.D., Chairman 
Carl W. Gottschalk, M.D. 
William E. Lassiter, M.D. 
Benson R. Wilcox, M.D. 



Alumni: 

Charles L. Herring, M.D. 
Isaac V. Manly, M.D. 
William W. McLendon, M.D. 
Shahane R. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 

Student: 

Don A. Gabriel 

Medical Foundation of N. C, Inc. 

Emory S. Hunt 
Charles L Powell 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

William Brinkhous 

Charles Wright 

Dept. Medical Illustration 



IN THIS ISSUE 




Message from the Dean 


2 


The National Health Service 


4 


Mountaineer Family Health Project 


6 


The Class of 1970 


7 


Matching Monday 


22 


Senior Banquet 


25 


Pre-Graduation Golf Tournament 


27 


Graduation 


28 


A Case for the Unity of Service 
and Education in Medicine 


29 


Senior Class Presidential Address 


31 


Senior Honors and Awards 1969-70 


40 


News from the Hill 


42 


The Fourth Merrimon Lecture 


58 


Alumni News 


59 


Alumni Necrology 


69 



MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN 




The Health Committee of the Legislative Research 
Commission has been directed by the 1969 General 
Assembly to study North Carolina's needs for man- 
power in the field of health, as well as measures to 
increase the supply and means of accomplishing de- 
sirable changes in the system of health care. At the 
beginning of this study, the committee held a public 
hearing on April 10, 1970, to receive presentations and 
information about the responsibility of state and local 
governments for meeting the health needs of the citi- 
zens, and ways of meeting this responsibility. My pre- 
sentation to this committee is the "Message from the 
Dean" for this issue of the Bulletin. 



7^f 



/ (^-*^ 



w/ ^ 



Mr. Chairman and members of the Health 
Committee: 

I am grateful for the opportunity to appear before 
this committee to give my views on the impor- 
tant questions you are considering under Resolu- 
tion 55 of the 1969 General Assembly. You are 
charged with the investigation of questions which 
are of major significance to the health and wel- 
fare of the citizens of our state. The significance 
of the questions is exceeded only by the difficulty 
of solution. 

According to my letter from the chairman, the 
question for consideration at this hearing is, 
"What should be the responsibility of state and 
local government for meeting the health needs of 
its citizens and how can this responsibility be 
met?" This is only one part of the charge to the 
Legislative Research Commission of Resolution 
No. 55, but I think it is the fundamental part of 
the charge and must be answered before other 
aspects of the charge can be intelligently ap- 
proached. All of us are concerned about the 
quantity and type of manpower needed in the 
health field, about the evident maldistribution of 
manpower in our state, and about the inade- 
quacy of the present system for distributing 
health care to our citizens. To meet these con- 
cerns meaningfully, however, the necessary first 
step is for the people of North Carolina, through 
the General Assembly, to establish unequivocally, 
once and for all, the degree of commitment and 
responsibility which the state, through its gov- 
ernmental agencies, will assume for looking after 
the health of its citizens. 

Before continuing my remarks on this basic 
issue, I wish to summarize briefly the position of 
the University of North Carolina School of Medi- 
cine with respect to health manpower, particu- 
larly physician manpower. Through the actions of 
the General Assembly in 1963, 1965, and 1969 the 
school has been brought to the position where it 
can admit 100 medical students for the fall of 
1970. This is an increase of 30 over the class ad- 
mitted in the fall of 1963. There have been con- 
comitant increases in many other categories of 
health professionals who receive at least part of 
their education in the School of Medicine. 

We presented to the 1969 session of the General 
Assembly, through the 1967-69 Legislative Re- 



search Commission, the outline of a plan where- 
by the medical school could admit 160 medical 
students to each class, with the possibility of 
going to 200 students per class. This outline was 
approved by the Board of Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, by the Board of Higher 
Education, by the Legislative Research Commis- 
sion, and in Joint Resolution No. 199, by the 
Legislature itself. In execution of this plan we 
have proposed to Chancellor Sitterson and Presi- 
dent Friday that part of the University's requests 
to the next session of the General Assembly in- 
clude additional facilities which will permit us to 
admit 120 new students to the medical school in 
the fall of 1973. This request is now under con- 
sideration in the administrative structure of the 
University; if it is approved finally by the Board 
of Trustees, it will be presented to the Advisory 
Budget Commission and the 1971 General As- 
sembly. 

Thus the School of Medicine, given the neces- 
sary facilities and resources, is prepared to in- 
crease its contribution to the physician man- 
power pool as rapidly as it possibly can. How fast 
the resources are made available is to be decided 
by the Legislature, There is no question in my 
mind that the state needs this increased produc- 
tion of physicians, and needs it as quickly as 
possible. 

As is stated in Joint Resolution 55, however, in- 
creases in manpower alone cannot solve many 
of the problem"; which confront us, especially the 
maldistribution of physicians throughout the 
state and the inability of some citizens to pay for 
the services of a physician. Thus we are brought 
back to the subject of today's hearing. With your 
indulgence, I should like to restate what I take to 
be the fundamental issue. The question is, it 
seems to me, "Shall the state of North Carolina 
assume responsibility for seeing that health ser- 
vices are made available for all the people of 
our state, no matter what their geographic loca- 
tion and no matter what their personal financial 
resources?" 

In my judgment, the time has come when the 
answer to this question must be an emphatic 
YES. Comprehensive health services are no 
longer to be considered a privilege of those 
whose financial resources can pay for them or 
who live in localities where doctors and hospitals 
are available. Comprehensive health services are 
the rightful expectation of every citizen, regard- 
less of his condition, and it is my conviction that 
the government of our state should now acknowl- 
edge the responsibility of providing comprehen- 
sive health services and proceed with the steps 
necessary to make them available. 

Almost a century ago, our state decided that the 
care of the mentally ill was the responsibility of 
the state and there was established a state- 
operated system which has evolved to the pres- 
ent excellent facilities and programs of the De- 
partment of Mental Health. In 1908 the first 
tuberculosis sanatorium was opened in recog- 
nition of the state's responsibility to provide 
treatment for and protection against the ravages 



of tuberculosis. It is time for the state to assume 
the responsibility for general health as it does for 
mental health and tuberculosis. I see no other 
pathway to a solution of the state's health needs. 
Although formal acknowledgment and accept- 
ance by the Legislature of the state's responsi- 
bility to provide comprehensive health care is 
the important first step, the direction we should 
pursue to meet this responsibility is yet to be 
decided. What shall we do in those counties 
where physicians and nurses are virtually ab- 
sent? What shall we do about the poor who are 
excluded (or exclude themselves) from medical 
care? What shall we do about the inadequacies 
of psychiatric care and comprehensive health 
care for inmates of our correctional institutions? 
A coordinated comprehensive state-wide ap- 
proach must be developed. 

As the next step after acknowledgment of the 
responsibility, I suggest that some agency of the 
state, either newly created for the purpose or 
already in existence, be charged with the respon- 
sibility of developing this comprehensive, syste- 
matic approach and with operating the facilities 
which are provided. 

Such a system as I visualize would be expensive, 
and much thought must be given to the mechan- 
isms of financing it. One possibility, of course, is 
support by the state government, such as is now 
provided for most of the institutions within the 
Department of Mental Health. Support shared by 
the state and county governments, as in the com- 
munity mental health centers, is another possi- 
bility. It is important that the system be devel- 
oped so as to be compatible with federal pro- 
grams to finance health services, for federal 
money will be available and will be needed to 
supplement our own limited resources. Federal 
Medicare and Medicaid funds, however, can cer- 
tainly be used to help finance state-operated 
health services just as they are now used to 
finance privately operated health services. 

What I propose will in no way replace the exist- 
ing system of private medical care. The State 
Department of Mental Health continues to ex- 
pand its indispensable programs, yet psychi- 
atrists in private practice multiply in our larger 
communities. What I propose would complement 
the existing system of private health services 
and would provide services for those people to 
whom services are not now available. In my 
judgment, private health services can no more 
meet the needs for general health in 1970 than 
private care could meet the needs for mental 
health in 1880. The direct participation of the 
state is essential. 

Mr. Chairman, the need in our state is great and 
is growing every day. I urge the Health Commit- 
tee and the Legislative Research Commission to 
acknowledge comprehensive health care as a 
direct responsibility of government so that con- 
cerned public officials and laymen as well as 
health professionals can have a clearer mandate 
for a frontal attack upon the problems confront- 
ing us. 

Thank you. 



THE NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE: SOME 
IMPLICATIONS FOR AMERICAN MEDICINE* 




By HENRY H. ("TOBY") ATKINS II ('72) 

During the summer of 1969, nine medical students 
from the three North Carolina schools and nine hos- 
pital administration students participated in a pro- 
gram sponsored jointly by the Duke Endowment and 
the King Edward VII Hospital Fund. The King's Fund 
is a charitable trust devoted to research and educa- 
tion in the administration of the British National 
Health Service (NHS). 

The program, entitled "The NHS for American Stu- 
dents," (appropriately subtitled "The NHS for Colonial- 
ists") resulted from the joint efforts of Dr. Carl B. 
Lyie and Dr. Robert Smith, faculty members in the 
Division of Education and Research in Community 
Medical Care at the UNC School of Medicine. Dr. 
Smith, who has been a general practitioner in the 
National Health Service, and Dr. LyIe, a student of 
comparative health systems, felt that many of the 
problems experienced by the British since the Na- 
tional Health Service was begun in 1948 are analogous 
to the problems besetting the delivery of health ser- 
vices in the United States, and particularly in North 
Carolina. England and Wales together are roughly the 
size of North Carolina, although their population is 
about ten times as great. Obviously, then, while the 
NHS cannot be transposed in toto to North Carolina, 
some of its experiences are applicable here. 

As a participant in the program sponsored by the 
King's Fund and the Duke Endowment,' I would like 
to record some of my impressions of the NHS and 
relate them to my beliefs concerning the evolution of 
health services here at home. 

The NHS is a tripartite system funded by a scheme 
of national health insurance which is subsidized by 



*Presented before the Student Section of the 116th Annual 
Session of the Medical Society of the State of North Carolina, 
Pinehurst, N. C, May 18, 1970. 

1. Other participants from UNC School of Medicine were Larry 
W. Boyles (70), William A. Lambeth III (71), E. Jane Meschan 
(71), William W, Webb, Jr. (71), and Lee A. Whitehurst (72). 



direct taxation. The system consists of: (1) a hospital 
service, which consumes almost 60% of the total 
budget for health; (2) a group of local health authori- 
ties (roughly the equivalent of our district health de- 
partments); and (3) a general practitioner (GP) ser- 
vice, which is funded on a per capita basis. A more 
comprehensive explanation of the NHS is to be found 
in an article in the New England Journal of Medicine 
for April 3, 1969.^ 

In spite of many problems and notwithstanding the 
rhetoric of the American Medical News for May 4, 
1970, which proclaimed "Ailing NHS May Go 'Private,'" 
the National Health Service is alive and well in Great 
Britain. The NHS works; health care is indeed a right 
in Great Britain and everybody, without regard to race, 
creed, color, national origin, income, or place of resi- 
dence, is entitled to and receives quality health care. 
Furthermore, everyone in Great Britain has access to 
a "family physician," that mythical beast so rapidly 
vanishing from the North Carolina countryside. If 
these are the goals of organized medicine in North 
Carolina — and I have reason to believe they are — we 
might all ask ourselves what can be learned from^he 
British experience. 

In the mid-1940s, Great Britain already had the equiva- 
lent of a national health insurance scheme, which 
dated back to social legislation enacted at the turn 
of the century. Just as in North Carolina today, how- 
ever, the British had a non-system of health services 
delivery marked by maldistribution of manpower, mis- 
use of facilities, inappropriate as well as inadequate- 
capital expenditures. The British Medical Association 
(roughly the political equivalent of the American Medi- 
cal Association), because they opposed in principle a 
national health service as distinct from national health 
insurance, refused to cooperate in the planning of 
the NHS. 

The direct consequence of this refusal was a health 
service designed by medical specialists which rele- 
gated the general practitioner to the periphery and 
allocated him second-class status. He was not per- 
mitted hospital privileges, not even laboratory privi- 
leges; he was underpaid; and his career mobility was 
circumscribed. Furthermore, remuneration was based 
solely on the number of patients the physician listed, ^ 
and any outlay for office space, ancillary personnel, 
or technical tools came directly out of the GP's pocket. 
Only recently, after almost 15 years of the Health 
Service, has the Ministry of Health begun to encour- 
age hospital ties for general practitioners and the 
development of multiphysician health centers, to 
which the local health authorities assign nurses and 
midwives. (The salaries of nurses and midwives so 
assigned are still paid by the local authorities.) 



2. Robson, A. M. The British National Health Service and Some 
Lessons to be Learned from It. New Engl. J. Med. 280: 754-761 
(April 3) 1969. 

3. Patients register with the G.P. and his remuneration is based 
on the number of patients in this registry. He gets paid whether 
or not he delivers any medical care over a given period of time 
to a particular registered patient. 



The National Health Service thus stagnated the evolu- 
tion of general practice in Great Britain at a level 
which we in the United States would consider quite 
primitive. Even in rural North Carolina, it would be 
rare to see a practitioner operating solo from his own 
home without ancillary personnel (even a reception- 
ist) or modern laboratory facilities to support him; 
until two or three years ago, however, this situation 
was the hallmark of general practice in Great Britain. 

If for a moment we regard Medicare and Medicaid as 
preliminary steps toward national health insurance in 
the United States, and further if we remember that 
decisions about such insurance are in the hands of 
a political system within which organized medicine 
is neither silent nor the majority, we have a situation 
rather analogous to that of Great Britain in the mid- 
1940's. Two points are obvious: national health insur- 
ance is the wrong place for organized medicine to 
fight the federal bureaucracy; and from the point of 
view of the generalist, it is potentially a disastrous 
place. A defeat on this issue would have consequences 
identical to those resulting from the British Medical 
Association's decision not to participate in the plan- 
ning of the NHS. However, by designing systems for 
the delivery of medical care which could grow and 
develop in response to national insurance, organized 
medicine could evaluate the generalist (family prac- 
titioner, general practicing internist, or general prac- 
ticing pediatrician) to a central position in the system; 
further, or,ganized medicine could ensure the decen- 
tralized control and flexibility which are now the 
trademarks of American medicine. Finally, organized 
medicine could take the leadership in avoiding the 
problems of stagnation and manpower emigration 
which have beset the British. 

The British experience can be utilized profitably to 
develop an organized response to the potential effects 
of National Insurance. From the outset of NHS the 
regions which divided the hospital service were not 
coterminous with the regions which divided the GP's 
and the local authorities. Because of the fantastic 
problems of referring patients to as many as 5 or 6 
different local authorities for nursing care, or referring 
them to 3 or 4 different regional hospitals, the regional 
areas have recently been reallocated so that they are 
now coterminus. The teaching hospitals, however, 
further confused the problem since in most cases 
they were without regional responsibility. This too has 
recently been changed so that now each regional hos- 
pital board includes at least one medical school com- 
plex and each medical school has regional responsi- 
bilities. Several of you, I am sure, recognize the simi- 
larities to your own situations and to the fact that 
many regional responsibilities are being assumed by 
UNC as the regional medical school. However, unlike 
the situation in Great Britain where regionalization 
permeates medical care for everybody, the major 
medical centers in this state see a disproportionate 
number of the poor, the black and the indigent. Chapel 
Hill, for example, records more than 70% of the births 
to Negro residents of Caswell County and less than 
2% of the births to white residents of that county. The 



sooner these inequities are rectified, the less dis- 
ruptive will be the effects of national health insurance 
on American medical care. 

Finally, let me return to the headline in the American 
Medical News: "Ailing NHS May Go 'Private.'" The 
headline refers specifically, not to the organization 
of the NHS, but to the funding of it. Although funding 
and organization are not separable issues in the United 
States, they are in the NHS. The NHS is no longer a 
political issue in Great Britain; however, the specifics 
of funding are. During the past five years the amount 
spent on private health insurance in England has 
almost doubled. Private insurance pays for amenities 
such as private rooms and the privilege of jumping 
"queues" (waiting lists) for elective hospitalization. 
One gentleman I talked to said that he was purchas- 
ing private insurance exclusively for the privilege of 
determining the scheduling of his own elective hos- 
pital admissions to minimize his inconvenience. On 
the other hand, he vehemently supported the prin- 
ciple of a national health service. In 1948 an adminis- 
trative decision was made to discourage the use of 
volunteers in NHS hospitals. Unfortunately, the little 
lady who pushes a book cart on alternate Thursdays 
cannot be replaced for love nor money. National in- 
surance clearly cannot cover all the demands on the 
system nor all the needs of the system in Great Britain 
and cannot be expected to do so in United States. 
Organized medicine, not the bureaucracy, should take 
the lead in determining which of these demands and 
which of these needs are beyond the scope of any 
regional or national system. 

In conclusion then, national health insurance is not 
a panacea for all the ills associated with our system 
of delivering medical care; however, it is the basis 
against which to build a system of medical services 
which guarantees the right to quality health care for 
everyone. 

Recently, CBS ran a two-part documentary on the 
health care crisis in America. The president of the 
AMA has asked for time to rebut. Gentlemen, these 
problems demand solutions, not rebuttals. Are we up 
to the task? 



MOUNTAINEER FAMILY HEALTH PROJECT' 




By EDWIN GAYLE FARRELL, '71 

West Virginia! Lool< at the rolling hills and you think, 
"This is good country." Look at some of the people — 
good, wholesome people, peaceful, "enjoying" their 
simple way of life, preserving their ballads and songs. 
But go up another "holler." Look at these children — 
dirty, ragged, undernourished. Their houses are merely 
four walls and a roof; their bathrooms may well be 
two planks stretched across the stream out back. They 
eat, sleep, play in coal dust. Drive through once-busy 
towns now deserted. Look at the slag heaps — filthy, 
stinking mounds of crud, some as long as two miles, 
as high as a five-story building. This part of the coun- 
try, these people were cast aside and forgotten. 

Forgotten, that is, until January, 1968. In that month, 
funds from the Office of Economic Opportunity and 
the work of a Vista Volunteer made it possible for the 
Raleigh County Community Action Association to 
establish the Mountaineer Family Health Project. 
Raleigh County was divided into seven districts on the 
basis of the numbers of economically deprived people 
in the county (numbering 18,000 out of a total popu- 
lation of 77,000). Each district was equipped with a 
district health center — at first merely a meeting place 
for the workers, where the secretary had her desk and 
records. These workers include: 

1. A registered nurse, head of the district team. 

2. Six home health aides, trained by the program 
in home health care, home economics, birth 
control, and history-taking. 

3. One environmental aide, charged with survey- 
ing each family's physical environment and with 
assisting to bring about whatever improvements 
are deemed necessary — for example, a new out- 
house or a sanitary means of garbage disposal. 

4. One health organizer, who gathers economic 
information to determine each family's eligi- 
bility for the program and acts as liaison among 
the various agencies assisting with the health 



•Presented before the Student Section of the 116th Annual 
Session of the Medical Society of the State of North Carolina, 
Pinehurst, N. C, May 18, 1970. 



program (welfare, vocational rehabilitation, 
juvenile corrections, mental health, etc.). 
5. Two or three ambulance drivers, who in four- 
wheel-drive Chevrolet vans, transport patients 
twice a day to and from the central health 
clinic in Beckley. 

All personnel are trained in first aid, and must have 
high-school diplomas or graduate equivalence degrees 
(G.E.D.) or be willing to accept help toward obtaining 
the latter. Of four home health aides who acquired 
the G.E.D. , three became licensed practical nurses. 

The medical staff of the central clinic in Beckley con- 
sists of five internists, two pediatricians, and two den- 
tists. The clinic is provided with a full complement of 
diagnostic equipment rented from Beckley Appa- 
lachian Regional Hospital (BARH). Members of the 
staff have hospital privileges at BARH, and approxi- 
mately 40 specialists are available for consultations 
and referrals. Operating costs of the project for the 
first year were $1,800,000. During this year, 8,000 of 
12,000 people registered by the project were seen at 
the central clinic. 

Currently, clinical centers are being built in three -of 
the seven districts. Each will have its own internist 
and pediatrician, but dental services will still be avail- 
able only in the central clinic. 

Is this program worth the money being put into it? I 
know 10,000 people who would say "Yes," emphatic- 
ally. In addition to being a coordinated effort by a 
group of people to upgrade the quality of their lives, 
this program offers first-quality health care to these 
people for the first time in many years. It is attempt- 
ing not only to show the people of Raleigh County the 
problems that exist in their county but also to assist 
in providing solutions to these problems. In short, it 
is a fantastic effort to change a way of life and to 
break the cycle of poverty and ignorance that has been 
handed down from generation to generation in this 
Appalachian area. 

The health program alone, isolated from its involve- 
ment in the total pattern of living, would be only a 
stop-gap means to provide relief for immediate medi- 
cal problems. Even if it offered no more than this, it 
would be concrete evidence to these people that they 
are not a forgotten group, doomed to a dismal exist- 
ence and to be counted forever among the ragged 
people of the world. Taken in the context of the com- 
munity action program, however, the health program 
becomes a foundation for permanent change. By 
bringing new streams of knowledge and health into 
the stagnant pool of ignorance, disease, and poverty 
surrounding these people, it can help them to attain 
the better way of life they desperately want. 

Physicians and other professionals in the field of 
health care have an unequaled opportunity to use 
themselves as one of the bases for much-needed 
orderly change in our society and its systems. To my 
mind, it is far better to participate and to lead in this 
change than to have it forced upon us. Instead of 
closing our eyes to the crying needs that exist through- 
out this land, let us become a part of their solution. 



i 





5 6 





"<l 



3 4 



% 



' M 




THE CLASS OF 1970 



1. 

WILLIAM CALVIN ALLSBROOK, JR. (27, Clayton, N. C.) 
majored in chemistry at Duke University, receiving the 
A.B. degree in 1964. After completing his internship 
and residency in pathology at NCMH, he plans to 
practice in eastern North Carolina. 

Bill's wife, the former Jerry Anne Boyd of Charlotte, 
is a medical technologist (UNC, 1965). They have a 
year-old son, William. 



CHARLES MALCOLM ALMOND (26, Red Springs, N. C.) 
graduated from UNC in 1966 mth an A.B. in chemistry. 
During his years in medical school he v^/orked all three 
summers in different departments of the school 
(anatomy, surgery and anesthesiology). He is taking 
his postgraduate training at Jackson Memorial Hos- 
pital in Miami, in the field of family medicine. His 
wife is the former Aimee Estelle Odom from Red 
Springs, N. C. 



HENRY CLIFFORD BAGGETT (25, Reidsville, N. C.) was 
a mathematics major at UNC, receiving his A.B. de- 
gree in 1966. During the summers of 1968 and 1969 he 
worked in the Departments of Surgery and Otolaryn- 
gology. His internship at the Medical Center Hospitals 
of South Carolina in Charleston is in surgery, and he 
plans to obtain certification in otolaryngology before 
entering piivate practice. 

Cliff is married to the former Gayle Powell, a UNC 
graduate from Ruffin, N. C. They have an eight-month- 
old son, Henry III. 



JERRY CHARLES BERNSTEIN (26, Wilson, N. C.) is a 
1966 graduate of Duke University with an A.B. in 
chemistry. Last summer he was a Duke Endowment 
extern at Sampson County Memorial Hospital in Clin- 
ton, N. C. He is serving an internship in pediatrics at 
the Unii^ersity of Virginia Hospital in Charlottesville. 
After completing his training in pediatrics and family 
medicine, he plans to practice in North Carolina. 



ROBERT GILLESPIE BLAIR, JR. (25, Winston-Salem, 
N. C.) attended Davidson College for his premedical 
studies, graduating with a B.S. in 1966. After complet- 
ing a rotating internship at the Medical Center Hos- 
pitals of South Carolina in Charleston, Bob plans to 
take residency training in orthopedic surgery, which 
will be his specialty. 

On May 23, Bob married Pauline Deschin Morris of 
St. Paul, Va., a medical technologist. 



LARRY WAYNE BOYLES (26, Hickory, N. C.) was an 
English major at UNC, graduating in 1966 with an A.B. 
degree. He was secretary of his class this last year 
and studied four months in Europe under a Duke 
Endowment fellowship. He expects to specialize in 
internal medicine, and is interning in that field at the 
Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. 
Wayne's father is Dr. Wayne Francis Boyles ('50). 

7. 

JAMES PATTERSON BROWDER 111 (29, Chattanooga, 

Tenn.) is a graduate of UNC (1962, A.B. in Latin) and 






10 11 




of Fordham University (1966, M.A. in theology). He 
was a member of the Honor Council in 1966-67 and 
winner of the Mosby Book Award in 1967. In 1969 he 
was elected to membership in AOA. During the sum- 
mers of 1967 and 1968 he worked in the Department 
of Pediatrics, and in 1969-70 he worked as a part-time 
obstetric anethetist in the Department of Anesthesia. 
Pat is serving his internship in surgery at NCMH. 



JULIAN GOODE BUSBY, JR. (24, Kannapolis, N. C.) 
was a French major at UNC, graduating in 1966 (A.B. 
degree). He was vice president of his third-year medi- 
cal class and worked during the summer of 1967 in 
the Department of Preventive Medicine under Dr. 
James A. Bryan. After completing a rotating intern- 
ship (U. S. Army Letterman General Hospital in San 
Francisco) and his military commitments he plans to 
specialize in obstetrics and gynecology. 

Julian's wife is the former Ann Reed McMaster of 
Charleston, West Virginia, and his father is Dr. Julian 
Busby, a graduate of UNC (A.B., 1927) and Johns 
Hopkins University (M.D., 1931). 



WILLIAM JARVIS BUSBY (26, Salisbury, N. C.) majored 
in chemistry and history at UNC (B.A., 1966) and 
entered medical school as a Morehead Fellow. During 
the summer of 1968 he was a Duke Endowment extern 
at Rowan Memorial Hospital in Salisbury. 

As part of his Army service. Bill is interning in surgery 
at the U. S. Army Tripler General Hospital in Honolulu. 
He plans to take further training in orthopedic surgery 
and eventually to go into community practice. 



His wife, the former Mitzi Sherrill Knight of Salisbury, 
is a UNC-trained technician; his father. Max Busby,J 
is also a UNC graduate. 

10. 

WILLIAM EUGENE BYRD (25, Sumter, S. C.) majoredl 
in English at UNC, graduating in 1966 with the A.B. 
degree. He is planning to specialize in internal medi- 
cine and is serving a medicine internship at the Naval 
Hospital in Portsmouth, Va. 

Bill is still a bachelor whose father, Capt. Hugh D. 
Byrd, is an UNC alumnus. 

11. 

HAROLD HARRINGTON CAMERON (26, Broadway.j 
N. C.) was a chemistry major at UNC, graduating inf 
1966 with an A.B. degree. While in medical school, hel 
received honorable mention at Student Research Day| 
in 1968. During the summers of 1967 and 1969 he 
worked in the Departments of Biochemistry and Sur-1 
gery; in the summer of 1968 he was a clinical oncology! 
clerk at the Penrose Cancer Hospital in Coloradoj 
Springs, Col. 

Harold is serving a rotating internship at the Victoria 
Hospital in London, Ontario, and plans a career inl 
academic medicine after specializing in radiationj 
therapy. He is married to a UNC graduate, the formerj 
Donna Marie Wiesner of Colorado Springs, Col. 

12. 

BRUCE S. CHANG (26, Raleigh, N. C.) was born in] 
Chen-tu, China, yet Raleigh is his home town. He 
attended Princeton University, graduating in 1966 with! 
an A.B. in biochemistry. During the summer of 1968] 
he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, and last' 



8 




13 14 





16 



iiTi 



year he participated in a summer project of the 
Addiction Research Unit of the University of London's 
Institute of Psychiatry. He also served as a member 
of the Board of the McCauley Foundation. 

Bruce and his wife Ann are living in Rochester, N. Y., 
where he is serving an internship at Rochester Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

13. 

DANIEL LIND CROCKER (26, Selma, N. C.) took his 
premedical training at Davidson College, graduating 
in 1966 with an M.S. degree. Dan was president of 
ADA and won the following awards during his medical- 
school career: Riggins Merit Scholarship (1967-68), 
W. Reece Berryhill Merit Scholarship (1969-70), Lange 
Award (1966-67), Mosby Book Award (1967-68). For 
three summers he worked in the Department of Medi- 
cine under Dr. R. I. Walker, participating in hematolo- 
gic research. 

Dan plans a career in academic medicine and is in- 
terning at Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas. He 
is married to the former Brenda Sue Lynch of Selma, 
and they have two daughters: Sue Ellen, 2, and 
Natalie, 1. 

14. 

CHARLES EDWIN CRUMLEY (26, Greensboro, N. C.) 
received his A.B. in chemistry from UNC in 1966. He 
was president of his senior class in medical school 
and participated in SHAC programs. During the sum- 
mers of 1966 and 1967 he worked in the Department 
of Anatomy, and in 1968 he spent the same period of 
time working in the Department of Surgery. 

His rotating internship in pediatrics and medicine will 
be served at Georgetown University Hospital in Wash- 
ington, and he plans a residency in pediatrics or 



medicine at the same institution. Chip and his wife 
(the former Barbara P. Barney of Greensboro) have a 
year-old son, John Clinton. 

15. 

JOHN SHUSTER DAVIS (26, Philadelphia, Pa.) is a 
graduate of Amherst College, where he received a 
B.A. in biology. During the summer of 1968 he did 
research work in the Department of Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

John and his wife, the former Dianne Higgins of Ft. 
Lauderdale, Fla., have a daughter, Deborah Kinsey, 
born March 7. They are staying in Chapel Hill while 
he interns in surgery at NCMH. After completing his 
training and spending three years in the Navy, he 
plans to go into the private practice of surgery. 

16. 

HENRY SHELTON EARP III (24, Baltimore, Md.) took 
his premedical course at Johns Hopkins University, 
graduating in 1966 with an A.B. degree. Last year he 
won the Second Award for a paper presented at Stu- 
dent Research Day, and was a student representative 
to the Southern Medical Association. In the summer 
of 1968 he worked with Dr. R. L. Ney in the Department 
of Medicine under an NIH fellowship, and early this 
year he participated in a program at King's College 
Hospital in London. After completing his internship 
in medicine at Vanderbilt University Hospital in Nash- 
ville, Tenn., Shelley plans to complete his training in 
that field and then combine an academic career with 
private practice. 

17. 

RICHARD McCONNELL FREEMAN (29, Charlotte, 

N. C.) graduated from N. C. State University with a 







B.S. in phvsics in 1963 and worked for 2V2 years as 
a research engineer in the Aerospace Environmental 
Facility at the Arnold Engineering Development Cen- 
ter in Tullahoma, Tenn., before completing his pre- 
medical studies at the University of Tennessee in 
1965-66. The summer after his first year in medical 
school he served a research clerkship at the U. S. 
Naval Aerospace Medical Institute in Pensacola; the 
following summer he was an extern at Memorial Mis- 
sion Hospital in Asheville; and last summer he had 
a clinical clerkship in pediatrics at the U. S. Naval 
Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla. 

Richard is interning under the family medicine pro- 
gram of the University of Alabama Medical Center in 
Birmingham and will take his residency in internal 
medicine and pediatrics. After completing his military 
service in the Navy, he plans to practice family medi- 
cine. His wife is the former Sherry Spann of Moss 
Point, Miss. 

18. 

JAMES OSCAR GOODWIN (25, Apex, N. C.) received 
a B.S. in medicine from UNC in 1967. During his 
sophomore year he was treasurer of the Whitehead 
Society. He worked in the hematology laboratory be- 
fore entering medical school and in the Departments 
of Dermatology and Surgery in the summers of 1967 
and 1968. 

After completing a rotating internship at Portsmouth 
Naval Hospital (Va.) Jim plans to specialize in obstet- 
rics and gynecology. He and his wife, the former 
Elizabeth Robertson of Clayton, N. C, have one child, 
James Oscar, Jr., born in August. His father and 
brother are also UNC medical alumni: Drs. Oscar S. 
{'21) and Joel S. ('59) Goodwin. 



19. 

STEPHEN LLOYD GREEN (25, Brooklyn, N. Y.) is a 
1966 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, where 
he received an A.B. in biology. At graduation this year 
he received not only the M.D. degree but also a B.S. 
in bacteriology. In 1968 his paper on glycolytic metab- 
olism won third place at Student Research Day. In 
the summer of that year Steve worked in the Depart- 
ment of Bacteriology; the following summer he served 
a clerkship in neurology at the Royal Free Hospital in 
London. During his senior year he was an active 
SHAC member. 

After completing an internship in internal medicine 
at the Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in Philadelphia, Steve plans to train in neurology 
and eventually to go into teaching. 

20. 

ANDREW CHARLES GYGI, JR. (24, Norfolk, Va.) grad- 
uated from UNC in 1966 with an A.B. in zoology. He 
was elected to membership in the Whitehead Society 
in 1967. Andy is serving an internship in surgery at the 
University of Florida William A. Shands Hospital in 
Gainesville and plans to specialize in orthopedic 
surgery. 



21. 

JOHN EDWARD HANNA (26, Sarasota, Fla.) graduated 
from Duke University in 1965 with a B.A. in zoology. 
In the summer of 1966 John worked in the Department 
of Pediatrics with Dr. H. N. Kirkman. In 1969 he was 
a recipient of a foreign fellowship award and spent 
five months in the thoracic surgery service at Aarhus 
Kummunehospital in Aarhus, Denmark. 



I 



10 




22 23 



26 27 





24 25 




After an internship in surgery at Grady iVIemorial Hos- 
pital in Atlanta, he plans a residency in thoracic 
surgery. 

22. 

JOSEPH MICHAEL HARMON (25, Greensboro, N. C.) 
is a UNC graduate, having received his B.S. in medi- 
cine in 1966. 

Joe interrupted his medical-school course for a one- 
year fellowship in the Department of Pathology, and 
has remained in Chapel Hill to intern in that same 
department. 

23. 

JOHN FREDERICK HARTNESS, JR. (25, Davidson, 
N. C.) graduated from Davidson College in 1966 with 
a B.S. degree. While in medical school, he partici- 
pated in the SHAC clinic activities at Chapel Hill and 
spent a summer working at the Alcoholic Rehabilita- 
tion Center in Butner. He is taking a rotating intern- 
ship at the U. S. Army Brooke General Hospital in 
San Antonio. He wants to specialize in family prac- 
tice and to work in the Charlotte area. 

John was married last year to the former Marilyn 
Houser of Indian Trail, N. C. His father is a UNC 
alumnus (Sch. Dentistry). 



in pediatrics and is interning in that field at the Yale- 
New Haven Medical Center in New Haven. 

Fred, whose father is a UNC alumnus, is married to 
the former Pamela Farmer of Chapel Hill. 

25. 

MARY DAWN HERRING (25, Wilmington, N. C.) at- 
tended UNC-G before transferring to UNC-CH, where 
she received an A.B. in zoology in 1966. During her 
junior year in medical school she was class secretary, 
and during her senior year was a member of the 
Honor Council, in the summers of 1967 and 1968 she 
worked in the Departments of Preventive Medicine 
and Psychiatry. She is serving an internship in pedi- 
atrics at the Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh and 
expects to obtain certification in the same field. 

26. 

ROBERT LINVILLE HINKLE (25, Charlotte, N. C.) did 
his undergraduate studies at UNC, receiving a B.S. in 
medicine in 1967. A member of AOA, he is interning 
in medicine and pediatrics at the Medical College of 
Virginia in Richmond. 

Bob and his wife, the former Patrice Casanova of 
Charlotte, have a son, John Reed Carson, age 11/2. His 
father also attended UNC. 



24. 

FREDERICK WAYLAND HENDERSON (24, Greensboro, 
N. C.) was a premedic at UNC, receiving the B.S. de- 
gree in 1967. During his junior year in medical school 
he won the Lange Award. In the summers of 1968 and 
1%9 he worked in the Infectious Disease Laboratory 
of the Department of Pediatrics. He plans to specialize 



27. 

WILLIAM BORDEN HOOKS, JR. (25, Tarboro, N. C.) 
received a B.S. in medicine from UNC in 1967. While 
in medical school, he was vice president of his fresh- 
man class and in the summer of 1967 he worked under 
Dr. W. B. BIythe in the Department of Medicine. After 
completing a family practice internship in the Medical 



11 







Center Hospitals of South Carolina in Charleston, he 
plans to take further training in the same field and 
then to practice in North Carolina. 

Borden is married to the former Barbara Lovill of 
Mount Airy, N. C. His father, the late Dr. William B. 
Hooks graduated from college at UNC and was a 
member of the medical class of 1928. His mother is 
a UNC-G alumna. 

28. 

DONALD DOUGLAS HOWE (25, LaGrange, N. C.) grad- 
uated from UNC in 1966 with an A.B. in chemistry. 
In the summer of 1967 he worked in the Department 
of Surgery, and during his senior year he served a 
one-month externship in Wilmington, N. C. He is an 
intern in medicine and pediatrics at the University of 
Virginia Hospital in Charlottesville and plans to obtain 
certification in obstetrics and gynecology before going 
into private practice. 

Don's wife is the former Frances Schultz, a nursing 
student from Winston-Salem. They have a 2-year-old 
daughter, Lisa Ann. 

29. 

MARK G. JANIS (24, Brooklyn, N. Y.) was a political- 
science major at Colgate University, graduating with 
the B.A. degree' in 1966. During the summer of 1968 
he worked with Dr. James F. Newson in the Depart- 
ment of Surgery, and spent his last school summer 
as a Duke Endowment extern at the Moses H. Cone 
Memorial Hospital in Greensboro. 

"Happily single," Mickey is taking his internship train- 
ing in medicine at the University of Florida William 
A. Shands Hospital in Gainesville. After a fellowship 



in hematology and fullfilment of military duties, or 
vice versa, he plans to enter academic medicine. His 
brother Kenneth is also an M.D. (N.Y.U. '60). 

30. 

JAMES JAY JENKINS (26, Greenville, N. C.) received 
his premedical training at Duke University, graduating 
in 1960 with a B.A. degree. As part of his military com- 
mitment, he is serving a surgical internship at Ports- 
mouth Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, Va. 

His wife, the former Nancy Jacobs of Raleigh, is a 
physical therapist who graduated from UNC. They are 
expecting their first child in September. 

31. 

ROBERT BROOKE JONES (27, Greensboro, N. C.) grad- 
uated from UNC in 1964 with a B.A. in chemistry. Since 
then, he has completed the requirements for a Ph.D. 
in biochemistry as well as for the M.D. degree, and 
he received both degrees at commencement. He is a 
member of AOA and of Sigma Xi and in 1967 was a 
member of the Student Research Day committee. In 
1966 he won the Lange Publishing Award. Before 
entering medical school, he worked part time as an 
orderly in the Department of Psychiatry, and during 
his medical-school years he worked every summer in 
the Department of Biochemistry. He also served as 
director of the Durham SHAC project during 1968-69. 
After finishing his internship in medicine at the Uni- 
versity of Washington Affiliated Hospitals in Seattle, 
Bob plans to spend three years in the Navy and then 
complete his training in internal medicine in prepa- 
ration for teaching. He is married to a UNC graduate, 
the former Barbara McLawhorn of Greensboro. 



12 




32 33 





34 35 




32. 

WILLIAM RAND JORDAN (27, Wilson, N. C.) attended 
Washington and Lee University before transferring to 
UNC, where he graduated in 1965 with an A.B. in 
English. While in medical school. Bill was a member 
of SHAC. He took a year off (July 1968-July 1969) and 
spent it in the Department of Pathology doing research 
and studying anatomic pathology. He is currently a 
surgical intern at the University of Florida William A. 
Shands Hospital in Gainesville, and plans to special- 
ize in otolaryngology, eventually going into private 
practice. 

Bill is married to the former Jeanne Hackett of Stony 
Brook, Long Island, N. Y. 

33. 

ALEXANDER RYLAND KEHAYPS (27, Edenton, N. C.) 
attended Duke University for two years before trans- 
ferring to Clemson, where he took premedical training 
graduating in 1966 with a B.S. degree. During the 
summers of 1968 and 1969 he worked in the Depart- 
ment of Anesthesiology. 

Alex is interning in medicine at the University of 
Connecticut Affiliated Hospitals in Hartford. 

34. 

CRAWFORD BRYAN KOON, JR. (26, Hickory, N. C.) 
graduated from Duke University in 1966 with a B.S. 
in zoology. He is a member of AOA and participated 
in the activities of SHAC. During his medical-school 
training he served a clerkship in medicine and pedi- 
atrics at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro, N. C. 

Bryan is serving a rotating internship in medicine and 
pediatrics at the University of Alabama Medical Cen- 
ter in Birmingham and plans to follow this with a 



residency in medicine. He eventually plans to go into 
private practice. 

35. 

FREDERICK GEORGE KRONCKE, JR. (25, Roanoke 
Rapids, N. C.) was a history major at Duke University, 
graduating in 1966 with the A.B. degree. For two 
months before entering medical school he worked in 
the Department of Psychiatry, and in the summer of 
1967, in the Department of Surgery. This past year he 
was a member of the school's Committee on Admis- 
sions. His internship at Strong Memorial Hospital in 
Rochester, N. Y,, is in medicine and pediatrics, and 
he plans a residency in obstetrics and gynecology ot 
in family practice. 

Rick is married to the former Leslie Jones of Atlanta, 
a graduate of UNC. His father is also a physician. 

36. 

CHARLES DEEMS LEFLER (26, Chapel Hill, N. C.) 
graduated from UNC in 1966 with an A.B. in history. 
He worked in the Department of Pathology during the 
summer of 1967 and in the Department of Preventive 
Medicine during the summer of 1968. 

Charles is interning in medicine at the Albert B. 
Chandler Medical Center (University of Kentucky) in 
Lexington and is considering a residency in medicine 
or ophthalmology. After fulfilling his military 
obligation, he plans to go into practice and teaching. 
He is married to the former Susan Mclntyre of Chapel 
Hill, also a UNC graduate. Their first child, Nathan 
Sumner, was born on March 21. 

Charles's father, Hugh T. Lefler, is professor of history 
at UNC. His brother Hugh T. Jr. ("Tam") received his 
M.D. here in 1967 and is currently a resident at NCMH. 



13 




37 38 





39 40 




37. 

JOHN RICHARD LEONARD III (26, Lexington, N. C.) 
received his A.B. degree from UNC in 1966, with a 
major in English and chemistry. He worked during one 
summer (1966) in the Division of Hematology with 
Dr. Richard I. Walker, and during the next two in the 
Department of Surgery with Dr. Erie E. Peacock. He 
is a member of AOA. 

After completing his internship in surgery at NCMH, 
John plans a residency in neurosurgery or otolaryngol- 
ogy, and eventually to go into academic medicine. 
His wife is the former Rebecca Wray Cunningham of 
Oxford, N. C. 

38. 

JULIAN LEE LOKEY, JR. (25, Raleigh, N. C.) majored 
in English at UNC, graduating with an A.B. degree in 
1966. He was treasurer of his senior medical class and 
spent two summers working with Dr. Francis J. Kane 
in the Department of Psychiatry. His last summer in 
medical school he was a pediatric extern at Watts 
Hospital in Durham. Lee plans to specialize in internal 
medicine, and is taking his internship in that specialty 
at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. His wife, the 
former Beatrice Turner of Wilson, N. C, is a graduate 
of UNC-G. 

39. 

PHILIP BESSOM MAY, JR. (27, Charlotte, N. C.) grad- 
uated from UNC in 1965 with an A.B. in psychology. 
During his medical training he worked three summers 
in the Department of Pathology and took a year off 
for a post-sophomore fellowship in pathology. During 
that year he worked on the effect of lead on renal 
tubular epithelium. 



Phil and his wife, Phyllis, are living in New Haven, 
while Phil is serving a pathology internship at the 
Yale-New Haven Hospital. He plans to take his resi- 
dency in laboratory medicine. 

40. 

JAMES AUBREY McQUEEN (26, Laurinburg, N. C.) 
took his premedical training at Davidson College, 
graduating with a B.S. degree in 1966. In the summer 
of 1967 he worked in the Tumor Clinic of the Depart- 
ment of Surgery, and during the same period of 1968 
he worked in the Department of Public Health, help- 
ing to evaluate cardiac care units in North Carolina. 

Jim plans to specialize in pediatrics and is serving 
his internship at the Medical Center Hospitals of 
South Carolina. He is married to a nurse, the former 
Linda McGowan of Salisbury, N. C. His brother, Dr. 
Donald H. McQueen III, is a UNC medical alumnus 
('67). 

41. 

JAMES DURANT MELTON (26, Glen Alpine, N. C.) took^ 
his premedical training at Davidson College, graduat- 
ing with the B.S. degree in 1966. The summer before 
entering medical school he worked in the Department 
of Psychiatry, and he spent two summers since then 
working in the Tumor Clinic (1967) and in the Depart- 
ment of Anesthesiology (1969). He also served an ob- 
gyn externship at New Hanover Hospital in Wilming- 
ton, N. C. 

Jim and his wife, the former Sandra Stickles of At- 
lanta, are living in Danville, Pa., where he is serving 
a rotating internship at Geisinger Medical Center. He 
plans to specialize in obstetrics and gynecology or in 
general surgery. The Meltons have two children: 
Matthew, age 6, and Particia, age 2. 



14 




42 43 






44 45 



1 



42. 

MICHAEL ALLAN MOORE (25, Mt. Airy, N. C) gradu- 
ated from UNO in 1966 with an AB in chemistry. He 
is a member of AOA and during his third and fourth 
years was winner of a Joseph Collins Foundation 
scholarship. In the summer of 1968, he served an 
externship in the Department of Pathology. 

Michael is interning in medicine at Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. On June 6 he married Janet Wilson Middle- 
ton of Raleigh, a UNC graduate with a B.S. in nursing. 
After completing his training in internal medicine, he 
plans to enter private practice and part-time teaching. 

43. 

WILLIAM KOLMER NELSON (25, Clinton, N. C.) is a 
Wake Forest graduate (1966) with a B.S. in biology. 
During the summer of 1968 he worked as a clinical 
extern at Annie Penn Memorial Hospital in Reidsville, 
N. C, and last summer he was a Duke Endowment 
extern at Sampson County Memorial Hospital in 
Clinton. 

Bill is serving a rotating internship at the Medical 
Center Hospitals of South Carolina in Charleston and 
plans to practice orthopedic surgery after completing 
his residency and his military commitment. His wife 
is the former Camille Graham, a medical technologist 
(UNC) from Raleigh. 

44. 

THOMAS WESTRAY NICHOLSON (26 Rocky Mount, 
N. C.) graduated from UNC in 1966 with an A.B. in 
history. In medical school he was vice president of 
the senior class and chairman of the Elective Evalua- 
tion Committee. He worked in the Department of 



Biochemistry during the summers of 1966, 1967, and 
1968. 

Tom and his wife (a UNC alumna, the former Sue 
Marshall of Aiken, S. C.) are now living in Oklahoma 
City, where Tom is serving an internship in medicine 
at the University of Oklahoma-VA Hospital. After 
completing his medical training and his military 
service in the Navy, he plans to go into private prac- 
tice. 



45. 

EDWARD ALVIN NORFLEET (28, Goldsboro, N. C.) is 
a 1965 graduate of UNC, with an A.B. in psychology. 
During his second year in medical school he was 
president of his class and winner of the William deB. 
MacNider award. During his junior year he was vice 
president of the Whitehead Society. He has spent 
every summer since 1965 working in the Department 
of Anesthesiology. 

Ed is interning in surgery at NCMH. He is married to 
a nurse, the former Ginger Reid of Hamlet, N. C. They 
have two children: Herbert Gregory, 6, and Kimberly 
Dare, 2. 

46. 

GEORGE MOTLEY OLIVER, JR. (25, Cary, N. C.) re- 
ceived a B.S. degree in medicine from UNC in 1967. 
A Morehead Fellow in medicine, he won the Lange 
Award in his freshman and sophomore years and was 
elected to membership in AOA as a junior. He was a 
class representative on the Honor Council for four 
years, serving as president in his senior year. In the 
summer of 1968 he participated in research on carcin- 
ogenesis at the Environmental Health Sciences Center 
in the Research Triangle, and in the summer of 1969 



15 







he was an extern at Duval Medical Center in Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 

George is serving a rotating internship at St. Eliza- 
beth's Hospital in Boston. He plans to train in and 
practice obstetrics and gynecology. He is engaged to 
Charlotte Anne Mason of Indian Head, Maryland, who 
graduated from UNC School of Nursing in 1968. 

47. 

MARTHA ELIZABETH PARKER (29, Asheville, N. C.) 
attended Randolph-Macon College for two years be- 
fore transferring to UNC, where she graduated in 1962 
with an A.B. in German. The following year she 
studied under a Fulbright Fellowship at Johann Wolf- 
gang Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany. Before 
entering medical school she worked as a medical 
translator in the Department of Pathology for 18 
months, and in the summer of 1968 she had the same 
position. She held one of the school's merit scholar- 
ships during her four years of medical training, won 
honors in pathology in 1968 and the third award at 
Student Research Day in 1970. In 1966-67 and 1967-68 
drawings which she entered in the SAMA-Eaton medi- 
cal art competition won honorable mention and third 
prize. Last summer Betsy worked in the Department 
of Cardiology. 

After completing her medical internship at Temple 
University Hospitals in Philadelphia, she plans to train 
and practice as an internist. 

48. 

RICHARD KIRBY PRIMM (26, Thomasville, N. C.) grad- 
uated from Duke University with an A.B. in chemistry 
in 1966. He took his first year of medical training at 
Baylor University College of Medicine where he was 



an NIH fellow in pediatric infectious diseases in the 
summer of 1966. He transferred to UNC in 1967. Kirby, 
was a member of the Whitehead Society (1968-69) and] 
was president of his junior class. He won the Heusnerj 
Pupil Award in 1969 and was the recipient of anj 
Alumni Merit Scholarship in 1969-70. He was elected] 
to AOA in 1970 when he also won the Roche Award. 

Kirby is interning in medicine at Vanderbilt Universityl 
Hospital in Nashville, and plans to specialize in thef 
same field. He hopes to do both practice and teach- 
ing. He is married to a nurse, the former Sharon Kay 
Lucas of Black Mountain, N. C; they are expecting 
their first child in October. 

49. 

DAVID ATWELL RENDLEMAN (25, Salisbury, N. C.)j 
graduated from UNC in 1966 with an A.B. in chemis- 
try. Dave was president of his freshman class and was] 
an honor student in his second and third years. In hisj 
senior year he was an alumni merit scholar and aj 
member of AOA. In the summers of 1966, 1967, andj 
1969 he worked in the Infectious Disease Laboratory] 
of the Department of Pediatrics, participating in re- 
search on virology and immunology. In the summer] 
of 1968, he served an externship at Rowan Memorial] 
Hospital in Salisbury. 

Dave is interning in surgery at NCMH and plans al 
residency in orthopedics. He is married to the formerj 
Mary Roueche McCanless of Salisbury, a physical [ 
therapist who is also a UNC graduate. His father, Dr. 
D. A. Rendleman, Jr., graduated from the UNC School] 
of Medicine in 1943. 

50. 

THOMAS ADAMS ROBERTS, JR. (26, Nashville, Tenn.) 

received his A.B. degree from UNC in 1966 with a 



16 



51 52 





double major (mathematics and history). In the sum- 
mer of 1967 he worked in the Department of Psychi- 
atry, evaluating preschool children for the first grade 
under the Head Start Program. During his junior year 
in medical school he won a Foreign Fellowship Award 
and served an externship at Warwick Hospital in War- 
wick, England. He was also an extern in gastroenterol- 
ogy at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. During his 
senior year he was a member of the Committee on 
Admissions. 

Tom is serving an internship in medicine at Ohio State 
University Hospitals in Columbus. After completing 
his medical training, he plans to go into private prac- 
tice. His wife, a UNC alumna, is the former Joanna 
Houston of Ahoskie, N. C. 

51. 

SUBIR ROY (28) was born in Khulna, W. Bengal, India, 
but considers Chapel Hill his home town. He holds 
two degrees from UNC: a B.S. in physics (1965) and 
a M.S. P.M. in biostatistics (1966). During the summer 
of 1967 he worked in the Department of Biomedical 
Engineering as a computer programmer and statis- 
tical anal>3':; in the summer of 1968, he was a research 
assistant in laboratories at the Biomedical Division 
of the Population Council at Rockefeller University in 
New York; and last summer he participated in the 
summer medical student program of the Carolina 
Population Center under Dr. J. F. Hulka. Since that 
time he developed a plasma progesterone assay based 
on competitive protein-binding. During his medical- 
school career he participated in the SHAC clinics in 
Chapel Hill and Durham. 

Shubi is interning in obstetrics and gynecolngv at the 
Los Angeles County— University of Southern Cali- 



fornia Medical Center in Los Angeles. He plans a 
residency in the same specialty and to fulfill his mili- 
tary obligation in the Epidemic Intelligence Service 
of the USPHS National Center for Disease Control. At 
present he is considering a career in academic medi- 
cine. 

52. 

ADRIAN STEVENS RUBIN, JR. (25, Greensboro, N. C.) 
received his B.A. degree from St. John's College in 
1966. During the summer of 1967 he worked in the 
Department of Psychiatry. Steve is serving an intern- 
ship in medicine at the Philadelphia General Hos- 
pital — University of Pennsylvania Division, and plans 
to practice medicine after completing his training and 
his military service. Steve's father and brother are 
both physicians; his brother, David, is a UNC medical 
alumnus ('68). 

53. 

MORTON EUGENE SHERMAN (25, Memphis, Tenn.) 
received his B.S. degree from the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology in 1966, with a major in life sci- 
ences. While in medical school, he was a member of 
SHAC and was a visiting student at the Institute 
National de Cardiologia in Mexico City for three 
months in 1968. In the summer of 1967 he worked with 
the Student Health Service in the Department of 
Psychiatry, and for the last six months at UNC he 
carried out research in cardiology. 

Gene is interning in medicine and pediatrics at NCMH. 
After a two-year residency in medicine, he plans to 
spend two years working as a fellow in adult and pedi- 
atric cardiology and eventually to specialize in cardi- 
ology. His wife, the former Susan Shapiro of Staten 



17 






54 55 







Island, N. Y., is a UNC graduate and a member of the 
medical class of 1973. 

54. 

JAMES BOYKIN SLOAN (30, Wilmington, N. C.) re- 
ceived his A.B. (in history) from UNC in 1962. During 
the summer of 1967 he worked on the genetics pro- 
gram of the Department of Pathology and during the 
same season of 1968 and 1969 in the Department of 
Ophthalmology. In 1969 he won first award on Student 
Research Day and a $3000 scholarship from Seeing 
Eye, Inc. for his research in ophthalmology. 

Jim is taking a rotating internship at Geisinger Medi- 
cal Center in Danville, Pa., and plans to continue 
training in ophthalmology. He is married to the former 
Blair Maddison of Scotland Neck. Their children are 
James, Jr., age 5, and Elizabeth Blair, age 2. His 
father, the late Dr. David Bryan Sloan was a UNC 
medical alumnus ('12); his brother David is also a 
physician. 

55. 

KENNETH W. SMITHSON (25, Southern Pines, N. C.) 
attended Belmont Abbey College for two years before 
transferring to UNC, where he graduated with an A.B. 
in history in 1966. In the summers of 1967 and 1968 
he worked in the Department of Psychiatry. He was a 
member of SHAC and was a Duke Endowment extern 
in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Edin- 
burgh in Scotland. He is interning in medicine at 
George Washington University Hospital in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

56. 

JAMES DAVID SMITHWICK (25, Morehead City, N. C.) 

received his A.B. in chemistry from UNC in 1966. He 



spent the summer of 1967 as a Duke Endowment 
extern at Rex Hospital in Raleigh, and during the 
summer of 1968 he worked in the Department of Psy- 
chiatry. He was vice president of his sophomore class. 
Jim is serving an internship in pediatrics at the Medi- 
cal Center Hospitals of South Carolina in Charleston.j 
After completing his training, he plans to practice' 
pediatrics. 

57. 

WILLIAM RINGGOLD STRAUGHN III (27, Chapel Hill,| 
N. C.) graduated from UNC in 1964 with an A.B. inl 
chemistry. He worked in the Department of Pathology) 
every summer of his medical training and took two! 
years off from the regular curriculum to work toward] 
a Ph.D. in that field (he hopes to complete the require- 
ments for this degree in 1971). He was made anj 
associate member of Sigma Xi in 1968. A founding] 
member of SHAC, he served as its treasurer in 1969. 

Bill is interning In pediatrics at H. C. Moffit-Univer- 
sity of California Hospitals in San Francisco. After! 
completing a residency in that specialty and his mill-} 
tary commitments he plans to remain in academia. 
His wife is the former Gloria Giaveno of Queens, N. Y.,j 
a graduate of UNC School of Nursing. His father isj 
professor of bacteriology at UNC. 

58 & 59. 

CHRISTINE OLIVER SUBERMAN (24, Raleigh, N. O' 
graduated from UNC in 1966 with an A,B. in zoology. 
She served as class secretary (freshman), class treas- 
urer (sophomore), and on the Student Research Day 
Committee and SHAC. In the summer of 1966 she 
worked in the Department of Medicine, and in the 
summer of 1968, in the Department of Radiology. She 
was inducted into AOA in her senior year. 



18 



M 



60 61 





62 63 




Christine, whose father was the late Dr. Richard L. 
Oliver ('40), plans an academic career in internal medi- 
cine and is currently interning at NCMH (medicine) 
with her husband 

RICK IAN SUBERMAN (27, Raleigh, N. C.) who at- 
tended Dartmouth College, N. C. State University, and 
UNC before entering medical school. He was a mem- 
ber of the Student Research Day Committee (1968, 
1970), of the Duke Endowment Externship Committee 
(1969), and of SHAC. In the summers of 1967 and 1968, 
he worked in the Departments of Physiology and Radi- 
ology, respectively. 

Rick has already completed his military service. His 
internship at NCMH is in pediatrics and medicine, 
and he plans a career in academic radiology. His 
father is a UNC alumnus. 

60. 

EDWARD BURT SUSSMAN (25, Park Ridge, N. J.) is 
a 1966 graduate of Rutgers University with a B.^. in 
biologic sciences. In the summer of 1967 he held an 
epidemiology research training fellowship in the New 
York City Department of Public Health. He won honors 
during his sophomore year in medical school and was 
a trainee in the Department of Pathology during 1969. 
He plans to become a pathologist and is interning at 
The New York Hospital in New York City. 

Ed and his wife— the former Heather Sommers of 
Princeton, N. J.— have a daughter, Lila Bess, who is 
a year old. 

61. 

CHARLES CARROLL THOMAS, II (24, Hickory, N. C.) 

graduated from Wofford College in Spartanburg, S. C, 



in 1966, with a B.S. in biology. While in medical school, 
he spent two summers as an extern at Broughton Hos- 
pital in Morganton. He plans to specialize in radiology 
and is serving an internship in that specialty at the 
Medical Center Hospitals of South Carolina at Charles- 
ton. 

Charles was married on June 6 to Carolyn Charlene 
Read of Columbia, S. C. 

62. 

CHARLES EUGENE THOMPSON (26, Rocky Mount, 
N. C.) graduated from North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University in 1966 with a B.S. in biol- 
ogy. While in medical school he was a member of 
SHAC and treasurer of his junior class. As a result of 
work done in the Department of Epidemiology in the 
summers of 1967 and 1968 with Dr. Herman Tyroler a 
paper was published on the epidemiology of the 
sickle cell trait in Charleston County, S. C. (Arch. 
Environ. Health. 17: 891-898, 1968). During his senior 
year he served as a member of the Admissions Com- 
mittee. 

Charles is serving an internship in medicine at the 
Harlem Hospital Center, an affiliated teaching hospital 
of Columbia University in New York. He plans to take 
further training in internal medicine and a fellowship 
in cardiology before beginning practice in Greensboro. 

63. 

THURLOW REED UNDERHILL (27, Raleigh, N. C.) re- 
ceived his B.A. in psychology from the University of 
Virginia in 1966. During his first three years in medical 
school, he was a member of the Student Council and 
the Honor Council, as well as a student representative 
to the Committee on Electives and the Educational 



19 







Policy Committee. In the summer of 1967 he worked 
in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology with 
Dr. R. G. Brame; the result of this work was published 
in the July 1969 issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

The following summer he was a foreign fellow at 
Warwick Hospital (Warwick, England) and last summer 
he was a Duke Endowment fellow studying in Samp- 
son County Memorial Hospital (Clinton, N. C). During 
his senior year he was president of the Whitehead 
Medical Society and served on the Committee on Ad- 
missions, the Merrimon Lectureship Selection Com- 
mittee, the Educational Policy Committee, and the 
Student-Faculty Advisory Council. He was also a repre- 
sentative to the Medical Society of the State of North 
Carolina. 

As part of his tour of duty in the Navy, Reed is serving 
a rotating internship at the Naval Hospital in Ports- 
mouth, Va.; while a senior he was on the Naval Senior 
Medical Program. He plans to specialize in obstetrics 
and gynecology or in surgery and to go into private 
practice. His wife is the former Alice Graham of 
Raleigh, a UNC graduate. 

64. 

ROSS LEROY VAUGHAN, JR. (25, Nashville, N. C.) 
majored in chemistry at UNC, graduating with an A.B. 
degree in 1966. He was a member of the Merrimon 
Lectureship Selection Committee this past year, as 
well as a member of SHAC. In the summer of 1967 he 
worked in the Department of Physiology, and as part 
of his medical course he served as an extern at Mont- 
gomery Memorial Hospital in Troy, N. C. 

Ross and his wife, the former Paula Sue Russell of 
Troy, are staying in Chapel Hill while Ross interns in 
pediatrics at NCMH. After completing his training in 



that specialty and two years of service in the Navy, 
he plans to go into private practice. 

65 & 66. 

DEWEY DANCE WALKER (31, Fayetteville, N. C.) re- 
ceived a B.S. in nursing from UNC in 1960. She went 
to Denver to work at Colorado Medical Center where 
she became head nurse in the surgical service. After 
three years, she returned to Chapel Hill to take the 
necessary graduate courses to fulfill the premedical 
requirements and enter medical school. While in grad- 
uate school she continued to work as a nurse (NCMH). 
During the summer of 1967 she studied hematology 
in Boston and spent the next summer as a pediatric 
nurse in NCMH. She was secretary of the Whitehead 
Society in 1967-68. 

Dewey is postponing her internship for a year. She is 
currently in Denver with her husband 

EDWIN LANCE WALKER (27, Raleigh, N. C.) who grad- 
uated from Davidson College in 1965 with a B.S. in 
biochemistry, then attended N. C. State University for 
a year before entering medical school. In the summers 
of 1967 and 1968 he worked in the Division of Thoracic 
and Cardiovascular Surgery and in the Department of 
Radiology. He also spent three months doing cardio- 
vascular research in San Diego. 

Lance is serving an internship in surgery at Colorado 
Medical Center in Denver. After completing his resi- 
dency training, he plans to go into practice and teach- 
ing. 

67. 

EVERETTE JOSEPH WALTON, JR. (26, Salisbury, N. C.) 

graduated from UNC in 1966 with an A.B. in psychol- 



20 



^^ ^ 



\ 41 



68 69 




70 71 




ogy. He worked in the Department of Anatomy during 
the summer of 1966 and in the Department of IVledi- 
cine for the next three summers. As part of his medi- 
cal course, he took a metabolism rotation at Barnes 
Hospital, Washington University, in St. Louis, Mo. 

Joe is interning in medicine at Vanderbilt University 
Hospital in Nashville. He is married to the former 
Linda Cameron of Goldsboro. 

68. 

WILLIAM JESSE WEATHERLY (27, Washington, N. C.) 
graduated from UNC in 1966 with a B.S. in chemistry. 
During the summers of 1968 and 1969 he worked in 
the Departments of Pathology and in the Division of 
Radiation Therapy, respectively. Following his intern- 
ship in surgery at Ohio State University Hospitals in 
Columbus, he plans to continue training in that field. 
Billy and his wife, the former Margaret Jackson of 
Washington, have a year-old daughter, Nancy. Mar- 
garet is also a UNC graduate. 

69. 

HEBER GREY WINFIELD III (26, Washington, N. C.) 
attended Davidson College, graduating with a B.S. 
degree (pre-med.) in 1966. Vice president of AOA, he 
was a winner of Alumni Merit Scholarships in 1967 
and 1968, of the Merck Award in 1967, and of Lange 
Awards in 1968 and 1969. In the summers of 1966 and 
1967 he worked in the Department of Medicine, and 
in the following summer in the Department of Radi- 
ology. After completing an internship in surgery at 
Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas, he plans a 
residency in either surgery or radiology. 

Grey and his wife, the former Dianne Curry of Wash- 
ington, have a 2-year-old daughter, Katherine. 



70. 

JAMES E. WINSLOW, JR. (27, Hurdle Mills, N. C.) 
graduated from UNC in 1966 with an A.B. in chemis- 
try. Still a bachelor, Jim is taking a family-practice 
internship at Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, in 
Greensboro. 

71. 

JOHN WILLIAM ZIRKLE (24, Jefferson City, Tenn.) 
graduated from Carson-Newman College in 1966, re- 
ceiving B.S. and B.A. degrees in biology and German. 
In the summer of 1967 he worked on carcinogenetic 
compound synthesis in the laboratory of Dr. C. T. 
Bahner of Jefferson City, Tenn., and the following 
summer he externed with Dr. E. P. Muncy, past presi- 
dent of the Tennessee Heart Association. Last sum- 
mer he worked in the Cardiology Division with Dr. 
Daniel T. Young. 

John is interning in medicine at the University of 
Virginia Hospital in Charlottesville. After completing 
his service in the Navy and his training in medicine, 
he plans to practice in a small town. He is married to 
a nurse, the former Eva K. Ergenbright of Charlottes- 
ville, Va. 



21 



w-^^ 




MATCHINC MONDAY 

INTERNSHIP MATCHING DAY 

MARCH 16, 1970 




MATCHING OUTCOME 

1st choice 65% 

J 2nd choice 9% 

3rd choice 13% 

Types of internships 

^ Medicine 22 

">SS Rotating 20 

Surgery 16 

Pediatrics 7 

U.S. Navy 4 

Pathology 3 

Family Practice 3 

U.S. Army 3 

Ob.-Gyn. 1 





W^^ f» s 



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26 




PRE-GRADUATiON 

SENIOR GOLF TOURNAMENT 






k 




27 



9 
r 
a 

d 
u 
a 

t 

I 



n 



two-thirty p.m. 
monday, June the first 
nineteen hundred and seventy 
Presiding: Dean Isaac M. Taylor, M.D. 



PRELUDE: Echo-Fantasy 

Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck 

PROCESSIONAL: Hippocrates' March 
Rudolph Kremer 

INVOCATION 

Fred William Reid, Jr. 

Chaplain, North Carolina Memorial Hospital 

A CASE FOR THE UNITY OF SERVICE AND 
EDUCATION IN MEDICINE 
Campbell W. McMillan, M.D. 

SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS 
Charles E. Crumley, M.D. 

PRESENTATION OF HOODS 
AND ALUMNI CERTIFICATES 

THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH 

The Graduating Class in unison 

BENEDICTION— THE PRAYER OF MAIMONIDES 
The Graduating Class in unison 

RECESSIONAL: Maimonides' March 
Rudolph Kremer 

POSTLUDE: Toccata 

Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck 

Professor Rudolph Kremer, Organist 



Honoring the graduates, their families and friends, tea 
was served in the Carolina Union immediately follow- 
ing the ceremony. 



28 



A CASE FOR THE UNITY OF SERVICE AND 
EDUCATION IN MEDICINE 




By CAMPBELL W. McMILLAN, M.D. 
Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

Members of the graduating class of 1970, family mem- 
bers, Dean Taylor, colleagues, and friends: 

In the age of Aquarius, when violent polarization 
seems to be the order of the day, the gentle polari- 
zation represented by the graduation of a class from 
this medical school acquires a renewed significance. 
In a world with greater human understanding, sepa- 
ration of groups of persons from each other might 
take a cue from graduation day, marked as this day 
is by a transaction of affection and high hopes be- 
tween the establishment and departing constituents. 
It is a tremendous privilege for me to participate in 
this transaction and to help invest within each diploma 
awarded to members of the Class of 1970 an enduring 
sense of partnership with the University of North 
Carolina School of Medicine. I thank you, class mem- 
bers, for the honor of speaking to you on your gradu- 
ation day. 

The purpose of my remarks is threefold: first, to try 
to convince you that professional medical service and 
continuing medical education from this point on 
should constitute a single process; second, to indicate 
certain fundamental reasons why a perfect unity of 
service and education will be impossible for you to 
achieve; and third, to point out a possible approach 
to this dilemma. 

Before I proceed further, let me reinforce with simple 
definitions the principal terms which I have used and 
will be using. By "professional medical service" I 
mean a continuing effort to achieve maximum skill in 
the delivery of medical or surgical care to patients. 
By "medical education" I mean the continuing growth 
and development of scholarship in matters of health 
and disease. By "scholarship" I mean a disciplined 
process of asking important questions and trying to 
find honest answers through research. Unfortunately, 
such terms as "patient care," "scholarship," and "re- 
search" tend to conjure up semantic nightmares and 



to cause instant polarization of different kinds of peo- 
ple involved in medicine. 

My premise is that ideal professional medical service 
and ideal medical education constitute a single, not 
a double, process; the separation of these functions 
is merely a human artifact. In this connection, I sub- 
mit that care of patients, scholarship, and research 
should not be considered as separate categories but 
rather as a single excellent process involving patients 
and physicians, regardless of location. Furthermore, 
since a person does not instantly become a profes- 
sional physician, the four years of medical school 
which you have completed, in which education has 
been emphasized more than service, may be regarded 
in a very real sense as a preliminary but necessary 
artifact. These years will be substantially wasted 
unless continuing education and professional excel- 
lence become joined to the greatest extent possible in 
a process of growth and development. 

Unfortunately, the artificial separation of education 
from professionalism which characterizes formal edu- 
cation, medical or otherwise, is perpetuated by grad- 
uates who regard the movement from scholarship to 
practice as a great deliverance. Let me hasten to add, 
however, that there are no grounds for most of us to 
engage in finger-pointing, regardless of our location, 
styles of work, basic energies or intellectual capaci- 
ties. Sinners and saints that we continuously are, 
slipping and sliding in and out of grace, there is 
always more room for the growth and development of 
scholarly professionalism than even the best aca- 
demicians and practitioners among us may care to 
admit. Indeed, if the truth were known and the stupid- 
est man in the world could be assigned values of 1% 
genius and 99% fool, I daresay the values assigned to 
the smartest man in the world would be no more than 
10% genius and not less than 90% fool. These esti- 
mates are not designed to comfort the "have-nots" 
and to alarm the "haves"; these estimates are de- 
signed to stimulate us all. 

Apparently the human mind is so constructed that it 
simply cannot effectively grasp a single continuous 
process. Everything— like Caesar's Gaul, God, and 
even this speech — seems to be divided into three 
parts, more or less. In pediatrics, for instance, we 
have inserted young people into separate pigeonholes 
for infants, children, and adolescents, not to speak of 
subdivisions of these pigeonholes. We have told you 
very little, however, about the continuous process of 
growth and development which is what pediatrics is 
really all about. The reason we have told you so little 
about it is that our minds simply do not include that 
much understanding. These generalizations can be 
very easily extended to the other clinical departments 
and to the basic sciences as well. In short, your 
exposure to the continuum which is inscribed by man 
—from birth to death in health and in disease — has 
duplicated palpation of the elephant by blind men 
who could grasp parts but not the whole. 

By no means is this statement intended as an apology 
for your education which would have been ordered 



29 



along the same basic lines in any other medical school 
you might have attended. Medical educators have 
increasingly recognized the need for more unity in 
the medical curriculum, and many schools, including 
this one, are testing new approaches. Such revisions 
are both desirable and appropriate, and further re- 
visions in the future can be confidently anticipated. 
The fact remains, however, that as long as the mind 
of man has its present characteristics — and major 
changes cannot be foreseen — learning about a thing 
will continue to consist in analyzing its parts. There- 
fore, academic artifacts will stay with us. 

At this point let me hasten to remind you that these 
observations, whether right or wrong, are derived from 
ideas which have been cultivated for centuries. For 
example, in the 4th century B.C. the Greek philosopher 
Zeno of Elea suggested that an arrow in flight, instead 
of moving continuously from bowman to target, actu- 
ally occupies an infinite series of stationary points. 
According to a theory of continuous flight, the move- 
ment of the arrow is real and the stationary points 
fitting its pathway are academic artifacts. According 
to Zeno's theory, the stationary points are real and the 
apparent movement of the arrow is a practical artifact. 
This may seem to be a silly problem to worry about, 
especially in the age of Aquarius. But the fact remains 
that your education to date, including that in medical 
school, has taught you to think of the flight of the 
arrow as a series of points. 

Despite the proven effectiveness of this approach to 
some kinds of continuous phenomena — just ask Neil 
Armstrong — it is important, I think, to realize that 
formal education has tended to miss a vital point: the 
arrow in flight does not care at all about the series of 
points inscribed by its path. It is important, therefore, 
that by some kind of graceful magic which formal 
education cannot completely provide, the student be 
enabled to sense the whole as well as to analyze the 
separate parts of a continuous process. Without the 
magic, either of two basic errors may be committed: 
some may claim to sense the whole without bothering 
with analysis, and others may claim that their analysis 
can adequately encompass the whole. Although lack- 
ing perfect magic, wiser persons will engage in a 
continuous process of matching incomplete visions 
of the whole with imperfect analyses of its parts. This 
process of continuous effort, like Jacob's wrestling 
match with the angel, may produce the graceful 
magic. 

Obviously, it is much easier to talk about arrows in 
flight than to extrapolate from arrows to professional 
medical service without serious oversimplifications. 

Nonetheless, I hope you see the essential analogies. 
In short, professional medical service (whatever its 
form) and medical education should be a continuous 
and single process. In order to prepare you for your 
professional service, formal education has done the 
only thing it can or should do, and that is to present 
an analysis of some of the ingredients of your future 
service. It is now up to you, in partnership with this 
medical school, to try to blend the whole which will 



be your professional medical service with parts identi- 
fied and analyzed by medical education, now four 
years under way, in a marvelous adventure which 
should continue for the rest of your lives. 

Before closing, 1 would like to direct some personal 
remarks to you. For me you began somewhere back 
there with Joe and Linda Walton and Pat Browder, and 
the official phase has closed out with Jim McQueen 
and Bill Straughn. In between there have been high 
moments with the likes of a coffee expert from East 
Carolina, a philosopher who will probably go to the 
mountains of the West, a hard-driving soul from the 
North, a pundit from the Far East of whom one should 
not beware, a not-so-anorexic basketball player, an 
eye doctor, some excellent ladies who will never be 
run over by men, a thoughtful photographer, a would- 
be speech reviewer, a scientist who understands the 
smile of Mona Lisa, the owner of Willie Lump-Lump, 
and two excellent merrymakers who have been known 
to rescue slightly perishing citizens from Clarence's 
Grill. 

In sizing up the Class of 1970, I would say that you 
rank comfortably above the national average in regard 
to content of genius. But if you recall an estimated 
range of intelligence pulled out of the air and cited 
earlier, you will consider this counsel adapted from 
the ditty about the gentleman from St. Louis: "Baby, 
we've all got a long way to go!" 

For the beginning and the end and everything in 
between, I thank you — and I join the rest of the 
faculty, students, and personnel who make up the 
School of Medicine in wishing you excellent fortunes 
in the exceptionally troubled yet equally exciting 
times that appear to lie ahead. Be sure to keep in 
touch! 



30 



SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS 




By CHARLES E. CRUMLEY, M.D. 

In recalling the past four years, my mind can find only 
pleasant memories. I remember the feeling of excite- 
ment, anticipation, and — yes, even fear— of the first 
day we met in September of 1966 to begin our medical 
careers. I remember Ed Norfleet portraying Dr. Van 
Cleave in our first, and probably best-prepared, 
student-faculty skit. I can still see a classmate falling 
like a giant sequoia as 50 cc. of blood was being 
drawn from his arm for one of our biochemistry experi- 
ments. I remember the Watermelon Ranch party after 
our second-year exams, with a rugby match in the 
middle of the night; and the numerous individual 
experiences, both comical and touching, that took 
place when we arrived on the wards our third year. 
Places, too, hold fond memories: Clarence's, Mama 
Leone's, and the beach. 

This past year, however, stands out as a year of people 
and names — not events or places — because it was 
during this year that our class became a family. Events 
like the New York trip, poker on free evenings, and 
various parties somehow seemed to unite our class 
with a closeness perhaps unequalled in any previous 
class — a closeness not unlike the brother-sister rela- 
tionship of a family. Yet we are not a collection of 
similar beliefs and ideas. In fact, our political views 
range from the far right to the extreme left, and it is 
the rare classmate who fails to express his opinion 
on any germane subject at our social gatherings. We 
argue, we fight, we fuss— just like any family; but our 
differences in opinion have only sponsored respect for 
one another, not animosity. 

One common characteristic, I think, has linked us 
together over these four years, and it is the same 
characteristic that will make us good physicians in the 
future. We care. We care if someone is having a hard 
time with one particular professor or service; we care 
if someone does not seem to get along with the rest 
of the group; we care if someone is not showing as 
much interest in his work as he used to. Somehow to 
me that is what medicine is all about — caring. And it 



is not a quality one can simply learn, like how to close 
the incision following a laparotomy or how to conduct 
a successful interview. 

No, it's not learned; it evolves. It evolves from parental 
concern and interest in the goals we have set for our 
lives. And it evolves after 20 years of education as we 
watch some of our closest college classmates sud- 
denly disappear into the complexities of everyday life. 
And then we wonder, "Will our class simply disappear 
too? Will we forget the friendships and good times 
we've had here at medical school? Will it really be- 
come as nebulous a memory as our high-school days 
are to us now?" My answer is, "No, I don't think so. 
These friendships — these personal relationships — are 
built on stronger stuff than those in the past." Be- 
cause I care what happens to you all and I think some 
of you care what happens to me, I believe we will 
somehow find the time in our busy days of internship 
to communicate with one another; for concern without 
communication is sterile. 

Communication, however, is rarely innate in one's 
character. It requires effort and time; yet its place in 
the present-day medical community is so important 
that adequate medical care cannot be given without 
it. I stress this point because I have seen patients— 
unfortunately some with whom I have been concerned 
— who have entered our hospital, spent many hours 
and a great deal of money, and were then discharged 
without having the slightest idea who their doctor was 
or what was wrong with them. Medicine can be so 
exciting, so intriguing that even the best physician 
may lose sight of his first and most important objec- 
tive — the care of patients. Patient care without com- 
munication is practiced only in animal laboratories. 
The hospital bedside is no place for laboratory medi- 
cine. 

The sterility of noncommunication is nowhere more 
obvious than in a family practice within a small com- 
munity, where the resources of the best-trained physi- 
cian are simply not adequate to cope with the vastness 
of medical knowledge. When he meets a problem he 
cannot handle, he either puffs himself up and denies 
his ignorance or calls on another member of his pro- 
fession for help. If he chooses the latter course, the 
burden of responsibility falls on the new doctor's 
shoulders, for he now has an opportunity to expand 
the referring physician's knowledge simply by com- 
municating. 

Without communication, medicine and its professional 
members are simply stale-minded individuals, alone 
and egotistical. With communication, however, the 
medical profession can become the ideal family — 
each member concerned for the others, and all work- 
ing toward a common goal of thorough and complete 
health care for every patient. Our class has experi- 
enced this working relationship this year, and it is 
my hope that this feeling of closeness, of family co- 
operation, will endure as we continue our medical life. 

And now somehow, after four long but unforgettable 
years, we finally are going to receive our medical 
degrees. The writing of this speech has brought tears 



31 



to my eyes on several occasions, and the pages peri- 
odically blur as I read it to you. This ceremony is 
certainly an event full of diametrically opposed emo- 
tions. We seem like caterpillars who have been locked 
in a cocoon to mature and finally, today, we all emerge 
to go our separate ways. 

As your president, I want to thank you with all my 
heart for allowing me the privilege and honor of serv- 
ing you this past year. Thanks are also due to the 
parents, relatives, and friends who have encouraged 
and guided us through 20 years of schooling. I also 
want to express our sincere appreciation to members 
of the faculty and house staff who have taken time to 



pick us up when we stumbled and to give us the 
directional guidance that was often needed to set us 
back on the road to this graduation day. And finally, 
there are 45 wives and unknown numbers of girl 
friends who have stood by us during our medical- 
school careers. There have been many times when I 
wondered if Barbara shouldn't accept this degree 
today in my place. Like all our wives, she has cer- 
tainly worked hard to earn it. It is a comfort to know 
that they will be with us as we approach what 
promises to be another long and difficult year. 

My best wishes go with each of you, and may God 
bless you! 




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39 



SENIOR HONORS AND AWARDS FOR THE YEAR 1969-1970 



The Isaac Hall Manning Award 

DANIEL LIND CROCKER 

The James Bell Bullitt Award 

ROBERT BROOKE JONES 

The Roche Award 

RICHARD KIRBY PRIMM 

The George C. Thrasher, Jr., Award 

MICHAEL ALLAN MOORE 

The Upjohn Award 

THURLOW REED UNDERHILL 

The Mosby Book Senior Awards 

JAMES PATTERSON BROWDER III 

EDWARD ALVIN NORFLEET 

The Lange Senior Awards 

DAVID ATWELL RENDLEMAN III 

HENRY SHELTON EARP III 

The Merck Senior Awards 

FREDERICK WAYLAND HENDERSON 

EVERETT JOSEPH WALTON, JR. 

Order of the Golden Fleece 

ROBERT BROOKE JONES 

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society 

*JAMES PATTERSON BROWDER III 

*DAN1EL LIND CROCKER 

ROBERT LINVILLE HINKLE 

ROBERT BROOKE JONES 

CRAWFORD BRYAN KOON 

JOHN RICHARD LEONARD III 

MICHAEL ALLAN MOORE 
*GEORGE MOTLEY OLIVER 

RICHARD KIRBY PRIMM 

DAVID ATWELL RENDLEMAN III 

CHRISTINE OLIVER SUBERMAN 
*HEBER GREY WINFIELD III 
Life Insurance Medical Research Fellow 
ROBERT BROOKE JONES 
The W. R. Berryhill Merit Scholarship 
DANIEL LIND CROCKER 



The Student Research Paper Awards 
The Deborah C. Leary Memorial Award 
EDWIN LANCE WALKER 

"Evaluation of Transplanted Lung with Pulmonary 
Angiography and 133-Xenon Scanning" 
The Third Award 
MARTHA ELIZABETH PARKER 
"The Apex-Cardiogram 'A' Wave and the Austin 
Flint Murmur in Aortic Regurgitation" 
The Third Award 
EVERETT JOSEPH WALTON 
"A Comparative Study of the Metabolic Effects of 
Alternate-Day and Short-Interval Corticosteroid 
Administration" 
Special Distinction 
FREDERICK W. HENDERSON 
"Serum and Secretory Immunoglobulin Levels in 
Infants and Children in a Day Care Nursery" 
National Foundation First Award 
HENRY SHELTON EARP 

"The Effects of 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol in Pa- 
tients with Familial Hypophosphatemia and Vita- 
min D-Resistant Rickets" 

Student Research Day First Award 

HAROLD HARRINGTON CAMERON 

"Further Studies on the Effects of Hypothyroidism 
on the Incidence of DMBA Induced Breast Cancer 
in Sprague-Dawley Rats" 



i 



' Elected Junior Year 



CLASS OFFICERS 

President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



CHARLES EDWIN CRUMLEY 

THOMAS WESTRAY NICHOLSON 

LARRY WAYNE BOYLES 

JULIAN LEE LOKEY, JR. 




AOA members 



40 




Class officers Lokey, Boyles, Nicholson and Crumley 



Parker, Rendieman and Primm 




Henderson and Walton 




Crocker, Underhill and Moore 



Earp, Norfleet and Browdpr 



Walker, Cameron and Jones 




41 



News from the Hill 



DR. REGINAL G. MASON (Pathol- 
ogy) conducted a symposium on 
"Blood Compatibility of Biomedical 
Materials" at Corning Glass Works 
(Corning, N. Y.) on April 10. 

Some 100 physicians attended this 
year's spring symposium on neo- 
plasia organized by the Depart- 
ments of Surgery and Radiology. 
The two-day symposium on "Clini- 
cal Problems in Early Breast Can- 
cer" focussed on early detection of 
that type of malignancy, and meth- 
ods of diagnosis and treatment. 
DEAN ISAAC M. TAYLOR welcomed 
the participants and DR. JAMES F. 
NEWSOME (Surgery) made the 
opening remarks. The featured 
speakers were DR. WILLIAM DONE- 




GAN, Department of Surgery, Uni- 
versity of Missouri; DR. WILLIAM 




SHELLEY, Department of Pathology, 
Johns Hopkins University; DR. 




HENRY LEMON, Department of 
Medicine, University of Nebraska; 
DR. ELEANOR MONTAGUE, Depart- 
ment of Radiology, Anderson Cancer 
Institute (Houston); DR. NATHAN A. 
WOMACK (Surgery); DR. JEROME 




URBAN, N. Y. City Memorial Hos- 
pital; and DR. J. GERSHEN-COHEN, 
Department of Radiology, Albert 
Einstein Research Center (Philadel- 
phia). 

A panel discussion, moderated by 
DR. COLIN G. THOMAS (Surgery), 
closed the program. The symposium 
was co-sponsored by the school, the 
Clinical Cancer Training Program of 
the National Cancer Institute and 
the N. C. Division of the American 
Cancer Society (especially the Har- 
nett County Chapter). 

DR. GEORGE R. BREESE (Psychi- 
atry & Pharmacology) has been 
awarded a Career Development 
Award by the National Institute of 
Child Health and Human Develop- 
ment. Under the five-year grant, 
assistant professor Breese will be 
studying substances thought to 
function as messengers in the cen- 
tral nervous system. 

DR. LENORE B. BEHAR (Psychiatry) 

attended the American Orthopsychi- 
atric Association Annual Meeting, 
held in San Francisco during the 
early spring, where she chaired a 
workshop on "Treatment of Emo- 
tional Problems in Preschool Chil- 
dren." 

A member of the Steering Commit- 
tee of the Research Task Force of 
the N. C. Commission for Emotion- 
ally Disturbed Children, Dr. Behar 
received this summer a one-year 
faculty grant to further her studies 
on the psychological characteristics 
of parents of emotionally disturbed 
children. 

DR. CLAYTON E. WHEELER, JR. 
(Medicine) attended meetings of the 
Association of Professor of Derma- 
tology and the National Program for 
Dermatology (Chicago, April 3-5). He 
spoke on "Recruitment of teachers" 
at the APD meeting. 



On April 27-29 he was a visiting pro- 
fessor at the University of Arizona 
School of Medicine. During his visit 
he lectured on "Herpes simplex in- 
fections." 

The school was well represented at 
the 54th Annual Meeting of the 
Federation of American Societies 
for Experimental Biology (Atlantic 
City, April 12-17) by members of the 
faculty, research staff and student 
body. The following are some of 
their presentations: "Parathyroid 
hormone and the kidney in calcium 
homeostasis of the golden ham- 
ster": B. M. BIDDULPH and P. F. 
HIRSCH (Pharmacology). "Relation 
of experimental arthritis in rats to 
localization of group A streptococ- 
cal cell walls": C. H. YANG, S. K. 
ANDERLE and W. J. CROMARTIE 
(Bacteriology). 

"The effect of altering blood pH on 
rat tissue and plasma salicylate con- 
centrations": J. B. HILL (Pharma- 
col.-Toxicol.) 

"Cholinesterase activity of human 
platelets: possible role in aggrega- 
tion phenomena": R. G. MASON and 
S. R. SABA (Pathology). 
"Influence of partial hepatectomy 
on renal response to isotonic saline 
loads in conscious rats": J. H. 
PERLMUTT, L YELINEK and R. 
ZANDER (Physiology). 
"Thrombocytopenia of hibernation: 
mechanisms of induction and re- 
covery": R. L REDDICK (74) and 
G. D. PENICK (Pathology). 
"Brain tyrosine hydroxylase activity 
and catecholamine content after 
intracisternally administered 6- 
hydroxydopamine to rats": T. D. 
TRAYLOR and G. R. BREESE (Psy- 
chiatry). 

"Lead toxicity: a problem in en- 
vironmental pathology": R. A. 
GOYER (Pathology). 
"Enhancement of subclinical lead 
toxicity by low calcium diet": K. M. 
SIX and R. A. GOYER (Pathology). 
"Effects of l-A^- and l-A^-trans- 
tetrahydrocannabinol on schedule- 
controlled behavior of the pigeon": 
J. M. FRANKENHEIM, D. E. McMIL- 
LAN and L. S. HARRIS (Pharmacol- 
ogy). 



42 



"Ultrastructural effects of platelet 
aggregation inhibitors": D. E. 
SHARP (72), J. C. PAINTER and 
N. F. RODMAN (Pathology). 
"Elevation on tyrocalcitonin in pig 
thyroid vein blood following oral 
administration of calcium": C. W. 
COOPER (Pharmacology) and L. J. 
DEFTOS (Massachusetts General 
Hospital). 

"Multivisceral control of factor 
VIM": W. P. WEBSTER (Pathology & 
Sch. Dentistry) and former Depart- 
ment of Surgery members C. F. 
ZUKOSKI and P. HUTCHIN. 
"Evidence of ethanol dependence 
in dogs": F. W. ELLIS (Pharmacol- 
ogy) and J. R. PICK (Pathology). 
"Some autonomic, gastrointestinal 
and metabolic effects of two con- 
stituents of marihuana": W. L. 
DEWEY, J. S. KENNEDY and J. F. 
HOWES (Pharmacology). 
"Double hemophilia (hemophilia 
AB) in a male dog": W. D. MOLES- 
TER, P. D. DAVIS and K. M. BRINK- 
HOUS (Pathology). 
"Sex chromatin and x-chromosome 
replication patterns and incidence 
of sex chromatin": R. C. BROWN 
(Pathology) and K. W. COLE (Oak 
Ridge National Laboratories). 
"Effects of valinomycin and potas- 
sium on glycolysis and intracellular 
pH of Ehrlich ascites tumor ceils": 
D. T. POOLE and T. C. BUTLER 
(Pharmcol.-Toxicol.). 
"Respiratory activity in cats with 
chronic lesions in the pontile pneu- 
motaxic areas": W. M. ST. JOHN, 
R. L GLASSER and R. A. KING 
(Physiology). 

"Binding of hedamycin to DNA and 
chromatin": H. M. JERNIGAN, J. R. 
WHITE and J. L. IRVIN (Biochemis- 
try). 

"Environmental diseases: a patholo- 
gist's overview and public health 
responsibility": P. KOTIN (Pathology 
& Institute of Environmental Sci- 
ences, Research Triangle). Dr. Kotin 
also chaired a symposium on "Pa- 
thology of Environmentally Induced 
Diseases." 

"Parameterization in quantitative 
muscle mechanics": N. A. COUL- 
TER, JR. (Surgery) and J. C. WEST 
(Interscience Research Institute, 
Champaign, 111.). 

Several other members of the 
faculty, as well as trainees in differ- 
ent departments, also attended the 
meetings. 



"Hemophilia and New Hemorrhagic 
States" edited by DR. K. M. BRINK- 
HOUS (Pathology) depicts the pro- 
ceedings of the IV International 
Hemophilia Conference (New York, 
1968). Published this spring, the 
volume contains 34 papers on 
hemorrhagic disorders presented at 
the conference, four of which report 
work conducted in our school by 
members of the Department of Pa- 
thology. 

Pediatricians ROBERT A. RICHMAN, 
JUDSON J. VAN WYK and E. MAR- 
TIN RITZEN attended the meeting 
of the Society for Pediatric Re- 
search held in Atlantic City in April. 
Dr. Richman's presentation "Ad- 
verse effects of large does of med- 
roxyprogesterone in idiopathic sex- 
ual precocity" was co-authored by 
DRS. LOUIS E. UNDERWOOD, 
FRANK S. FRENCH and Van Wyk. 

Surgeons ROBERT D. CROOM III 
('64), NOEL McDEVITT ('64), and 
KELLEY WALLACE ('63) participated 
in the meeting of the N. C. Chapter 
of the American College of Surgeons 
held at Wrightsville Beach in April. 
Dr. Croom spoke on "Cancer of the 
small intestine," Dr. Wallace on 
"The burn wound" and Dr. McDevitt 
on the "Management of unusual 
coagulation disorders." 

DR. RONALD C. REITZ (Biochemis- 
try) attended the spring meeting of 



the American Oil Chemists' Society 
held in New Orleans in April. 

"Today's management of the patient 
with Gl bleeding" was the topic of 
DR. JOHN T. SESSION'S address to 
the joint meeting of the staffs of 
Womack Army Hospital, VA Hospital 
and Pope Air Force Base and the 
Cumberland County Medical Society 
in Fayetteville (April 14). On April 
18 he travelled to Atlanta and spoke 
to the Emory University Medical 
Alumni Association on "Intestinal 
auto-intoxication revisited." In July 
he participated in the IVth World 
Congress of Gastroenterology in 
Copenhagen. 

Results of work done by DR. ROB- 
ERT TWAROG and MR. EUGENE N. 
BASKERVILLE (Bacteriology) on 
"Regulation of tryptophan biosyn- 
thetic enzymes in Clostridium bu- 
tyricum" were presented by Dr. 
Twarog to the American Society for 
Microbiology in April (Boston). 

An Open House for prospective ap- 
plicants to the school for the class 
entering in the fall of 1971 was held 
on April 18. The annual program — 
sponsored by the Committee on Ad- 
missions and designed to familia- 
rize candidates and their premed 
advisors with our institution— in- 
cludes short talks, tours of the 
school and hospital, informal con- 
(Continued on page 45) 




Members of the committee in charge of organizing the annual series of postgraduate 
medical lectures to be conducted in Morganton, N. C. next fall met in that city to plan 
the course, which is held yearly under the auspices of our Department of Continuation 
Education and the Burke County Medical Society. L-r: seated: Dr. Benjamin W. Garrou '61 
of Valdese, Dr. Thomas R. Nichols of Morganton and Mr. Woodrow W. Jervis (Cont. Edu- 
cation). Standing: Dr. Hugh C. Hemming '54 of Morganton (president, Burke County Medi- 
cal Society), Dr. C. Glen Pickard '62 (Medicine), Dr. R. L. Rogers, Jr. of Lenoir, Dr, William 
H. Kibler '07 of Morganton (general chairman of the course) and Dr. Millard M. Riggs of 
the same city. 



43 



XlVth Annual Parents Day, April 4 

8:30 a.m.— Registration. Lobby, J. Spencer Love Clinics. 

9:00-10:00 a.m.— Tours of the new facilities.'" 

11:00 a. m.-2:30 p.m.— General Meeting, Clinic Auditorium. 

Presiding: MR. L 0. BRANCH, President, UNC Medical Parents' Club.s 
Greetings: DR. WILLIAM C. FRIDAY, President, UNC.e 
Remarks: DR. ISAAC M. TAYLOR, Dean, UNC School of Medicine.' 
General Business Session 

The Charles H. Burnett Scholarship Fund, the Berryhill Scholarship Fund, 
and the Student Emergency Loan Fund— DR. J. MITCHELL SORROW, JR., 
Associate Professor of Medicine and Assistant Dean. 
Remarks: T. REED UNDERHILL 70, President, Whitehead Society.s 
"Medical School: A New Look at the Learning Process"— THOMAS G. 
IRONS 72.9 

"Radiotherapy at UNC: The Most Modern Therapy Center in the South- 
east: HAROLD H. CAMERON 70.'° 

"The Uses of the Medical School Airplanes": RICHARD NELSON 71." 
"Alcoholism: An Experimental Study in Monkeys and Its Relationship to 
Man": DR. FRED W. ELLIS, Professor of Pharmacology.'^ 
Lunch. 





44 



versations with members of the 
faculty and student body, scientific 
demonstrations and exhibits. The 
success of the yearly gathering has 
largely been due to the interested 
participation of faculty and students 
and has proven quite valuable to 
applicants as well as to the mem- 
bers of the Committee on Admis- 
sions. 

"Dealing with abortion in Britain, 
1970" was the topic of a special lec- 
ture by DR. D. V. I. FAIRWEATHER, 
chairman of the Department of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology at the Uni- 
versity College Hospital (London). 
The lecture, given on April 20 and 
sponsored by the same department 
in our school and the Carolina 
Population Center, dealt with the 
medical, ethical, administrative and 
political problems associated with 
the liberalization of abortion laws. 

DR. A. GRISWOLD BEVIN (Surgery) 
spoke on "Aggressive combined 
management of the patient with 
hand injury and hand surgery" at 
the VI International Congress of the 
World Confederation for Physical 
Therapy held in Amsterdam last 
April. Dr. Bevin's presentation was 
co-authored by MR. GEORGE 
HAMILTON, former head physical 
therapist at the Hand Rehabilitation 
Center. 

Findings of investigations carried 
out by DRS. CHARLES R. MORRIS 
(Medicine) and DAVID J. HOL- 
BROOK, JR. (Biochemistry-Pharma- 
cology-Toxicology) on binding of the 
urinary bladder carcinogen 8-methyl 
ether of xanthurenic acid to DNA 
were presented in April to the 
American Association for Cancer 
Research (Philadelphia). 

DR. RICHARD I. WALKER (Medi- 
cine) presented "The significance 
of hematological abnormalities in 
patients with tuberculosis" to the 
North Carolina Thoracic Society 
(Raleigh, April 23). The paper was 
co-authored by DRS. RICHARD L. 
GLASSER and JOHN C. HERION 
(Medicine). 

DR. WILLIAM P. GLAZEN (Pediat- 
rics) also participated in the Raleigh 
meetings speaking on "Atypical 
mycrobacteriosis in children." On 
July 7 he delivered a lecture on the 
same topic to the Blue Ridge Insti- 
tute for Tuberculosis and Other 



Respiratory Diseases (Black Moun- 
tain. N. C). 






i^ 



DR. CARL W. GOTTSCHALK (Medi- 
cine & Physiology)— a new member 
of The American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences— was twice honored 
while attending the meetings of the 
Federation of American Societies 
for Experimental Biology. At the 
Renal Group Dinner and Lecture 
(April 24) he was conferred the 
Homer W. Smith Award in Renal 
Physiology. Presented by the New 
York Heart Association the award 
gives recognition for a major con- 
tribution to renal physiology. He was 
also elected to the Council of the 
American Association of University 
Professors and began serving his 
three-year term in April. 

CHAPLAIN CLAUDE V. DEAL, JR. 
was certified as Acting Chaplain 
Supervisor at the April meeting of 
the Mid-Atlantic Regional Certifica- 
tion and Accreditation Committee- 
Association for Clinical Pastoral 
Education. He is now certified to 
teach students in the CPE program 
at the hospital, joining Chaplain 
FRED W. REID, JR. in the respon- 
sibilities of supervision and train- 
ing^ 

The April 22nd Combined Staff Con- 
ference was presented by DAVID 
ROGERS, M.D., Dean of the School 
of Medicine at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. Dr. Rogers spoke on "The 
spectrum of histoplasmosis in man." 

In April DR. GERALD E. HANKS 
(Radiology) was a speaker at the V 
Annual Wilson Memorial Hospital 
Postgraduate Symposium, an all- 
day program for practitioners in 
pediatrics, medicine and surgery 
and designed to cover recent ad- 
vances in the field of cancer. 
Dr. Hanks presented a paper on "An 
indirect measure of the effect of 
fractionation on bone marrow endo- 
thelium" to the X International 
Cancer Congress (Houston, May 22- 



27). He also participated in the IV 
International Congress of Radiation 
Research (Evian, France, June 27- 
July 4) where he spoke on "Altered 
recovery in non-cycling bone mar- 
row stem cells." 

DR. THOMAS W. FARMER (Medi- 
cine) was elected a director of the 
American Board of Psychiatry and 
Neurology, Inc. Dr. Farmer attended 
the annual meeting of the American 
Academy of Neurology (May 1, Bal 
Harbour, Fla.) and presented his 
and DR. GARY R. WISE's findings 
on "Bacterial cerebral vasculitis." 
Dr. Wise, who at the time was a 
third-year neurology resident, is 
currently a member of the staff of 
the Division of Neurology at Ohio 
State University. 

DR. MILTON L MILLER (Psychiatry) 

attended the meeting of the Ameri- 
can Psychoanalytic Association as 
a delegate of the UNC-Duke Train- 
ing Center Board of Professional 
Standards. The meeting was held in 
San Francisco on May 6. 
Dr. Miller's book "A Psychoanalytic 
Study of Marcel Proust" has been 
reprinted by the Kenni Kat Press. 

DR. JUDSON J. VAN WYK (Pediat- 
rics) was guest lecturer at the Vir- 
ginia Academy of General Practice 
in Roanoke, Va. (May 9) and at the 
Peter Bent Bi-igham Hospital in 
Boston (May 12 and 13). He spoke 
on "Clinical signs of thyroid disease 
in childhood" to the Academy mem- 
bers and on "Growth hormone de- 
pendent plasma growth factors" at 
the Harvard teaching hospital. 

DR. JAMES W. WOODS (Medicine) 
attended the annual meetings of the 
American Federation for Clinical 
Research and the American Society 
for Clinical Investigation (Atlantic 
City, May 2-4). 




45 



In late May— during the XXI Annual 
Meeting of the North Carolina Heart 
Association held in Durham — Dr. 
Woods was elected vice-president 
and president-elect of the associa- 
tion and he and DR. BENSON R. 
WILCOX (Surgery) were awarded its 
Bronze Service Recognition Medal- 
lion. 

Drs. Wilcox, GEORGE JOHNSON, 
JR. and WINFRED L SUGG (Sur- 
gery) participated in the scientific 
program of the meeting by speaking 
respectively on "Surgical aspects of 
bacterial endocarditis," "Septic 
shock" and "Cardiac transplanta- 
tion and artificial heart assist de- 
vices in the treatment of cardio- 
genic shock." 

This summer Dr. Sugg returned to 
the University of Texas Southwest- 
ern Medical School to chair the 
Division of Thoracic and Cardiovas- 
cular Surgery. He had joined our 
faculty last year. 

DR. H. STANLEY BENNETT (Anat- 
omy) has been appointed American 
co-chairman of the U.S.-Japan Com- 
mittee on Scientific Cooperation. 
The committee was organized as an 
experiment in the bilateral coopera- 
tion of science; for the last eight 
years it has promoted exchange of 
scientists and information as well 
as stimulated joint research proj- 
ects in several fields. 

The Gamma Chapter of North Caro- 
lina of the Alpha Omega Alpha Na- 
tional Medical Honor Society held 
their annual ceremonies on May 13. 
The fourteenth Adam T. Thorp III 
Memorial Lecture was delivered by 
DR. ALEXANDER NADAS, professor 
of Pediatrics at the Children's Hos- 
pital Medical Center in Boston, who 
spoke on "Neonatal cardiology." 
The newly elected members were 
announced following the lecture: 
J. PATTERSON BROWDER III, 
DANIEL L CROCKER, ROBERT B. 
JONES, GEORGE M. OLIVER, JR., 
H. GREY WINFIELD III (70); ENSER 
W. COLE III, W. RAY GAMMON, 
WILLIAM A. LAMBETH and G. 
TERRY STEWART (71). Seniors 
ROBERT L HINKLE, C. BRYAN 
KOON, JR., JOHN R. LEONARD III, 
MICHAEL A. MOORE, R. KIRBY 
PRIMM, DAVID A. RENDLEMAN and 
CHRISTINE 0. SUBERMAN, who 
had been elected to AOA in the fall 




Dr. Wilcox receiving the N. C. Heart Association IVIedallion. 



of 1969, where also honored at this 
time. 

Social events included cocktails, 
dinner and initiation ceremony at 
the Ranch House and a reception at 
the home of DR. and MRS. JAMES 
B. BRYAN. Rising seniors George 
Terry Stewart, William A. Lambeth, 
Enser W. Cole and W. Ray Gammon 
will steer the society during the 
forthcoming academic year. 

On May 15 the Division of Physical 
Therapy held its 12th annual Pro- 
gram of Recognition for their grad- 
uating seniors. DEAN TAYLOR 
welcomed the guests. Division di- 
rector MISS MARGARET L MOORE 
presented the graduates and intro- 
duced speakers DR. CHARLES W. 
HOOKER (Anatomy) and MRS. 
LYDIA S. HOLLEY, president of the 
N. C. Physical Therapy Association. 
The division has expanded its en- 
rollment from 16 to 24 students for 
the coming school year. 

On May 18 DR. EDWARD GLASS- 
MAN (Biochemistry) visited the De- 
partment of Zoology of the Univer- 
sity College of Dublin and lectured 
on the relationship of macromole- 
cules to the functioning of the brain 
and on enzyme regulation in ani- 
mals. 

Dr. Glassman was a participant in 
a symposium on "Biochemistry of 
Brain and Memory" sponsored by 
the University of Wisconsin-Parkside 
(May 24-26) to discuss recent find- 
ings of scientists charting the 
depths of the mind through bio- 
chemistry. The presentations were 
grouped into three sessions which 



considered the biochemistry of 
mental disorders, nervous system 
and memory. Dr. Glassman pre- 
sented results of his studies on 
"Brain function and RNA" in the 
"memory" session. 

STUDENT RESEARCH DAY, MAY 6 
DR. JOHN C. PARKER (Medicine)— 

Introduction 

"The philosopher-king in a new per- 
spective." 

E. LANCE WALKER (70)— The 
Deborah C. Leary Memorial Award. 
"Evaluation of transplanted lung 
with pulmonary angiography and 
133-xenon scanning." Preceptor: DR. 
ORLANDO F. GABRIELE (Radiology). 
LARRY L. ADAMS (72)— The Sec- 
ond Award and American Society 
for Pharmacology Essay Award. 
"Inhibition of hepatic triglyceride 
synthesis by ethyl chlorophenoyiso- 
butyrate." Preceptor: DR. HAROLD 
J. FALLON (Medicine). 
M. ELIZABETH PARKER (70)— The 
Third Award. 

"The Apex-cardiogram 'A' wave and 
the Austin Flint murmur in aortic 
regurgitation." Preceptor: DR. ERN- 
EST CRAIGE (Medicine). 
E. JOSEPH WALTON (70)— The 
Third Award. 

"A comparative study of the meta- 
bolic effects of alternate-day short- 
interval corticosteroid administra- 
tion." Preceptor: DR. ROBERT L 
NEY (Medicine & Physiology). 
JOHN T. CUTTING, JR. (71)— Spe- 
cial Distinction and Student Re- 
search Day Second Award. 
"Evaluation of renal infarction in 
two non-surgical experimental 



46 



methods." Preceptor: DR. JAMES 
H. SCATLIFF (Radiology). 
JOHN M. GILKEY, JR. (72)— Special 
Distinction. 

"A simple test for quantitation of 
platelet adhesion to glass: studies 
in bleeder and non-bleeder sub- 
jects." Preceptor: DR. REGINALD 
G. MASON (Pathology). 
GREGORY HAYDEN (72)— Special 
Distinction. 

"infectious hepatitis at North Caro- 
lina Memorial Hospital, 1953-68." 
Preceptor: DR. JAMES A. BRYAN, 
JR. (Medicine & Family Medicine). 
FREDERICK C. HEATON (72)— Spe- 
cial Distinction. 

"The use of umbilical cord for re- 
construction of abdominal wall de- 
fects." Preceptor: DR. COLIN G. 
THOMAS (Surgery). 
FREDERICK W. HENDERSON (70) 
—Special Distinction. 
"Serum and secretory immunoglob- 
ulin levels in infants and children in 
a day care nursery." Preceptor: DR. 
GERALD W. FERNALD (Pediatrics). 
H. SHELTON EARP (70)— National 
Foundation First Award. 
"The effects of 25-hydroxycholecal- 
ciferol in patients with familial 
hypophosphatemia and vitamin D 
resistant rickets." Preceptor: DR. 
ROBERT L NEY (Medicine & Physi- 
ology). 

HAROLD H. CAMERON (70)— Stu- 
dent Research Day First Award. 
"Further studies on the effects of 
hypothyroidism on the incidence of 
DMBA-induced breast cancer in 
Sprague-Dawley rats." Preceptor: 
DR. COLIN G. THOMAS (Surgery). 
DEAN ISAAC M. TAYLOR— Presen- 
tation of awards. 

The Department of Psychiatry car- 
ried on its program on psychoana- 
lytic training through the spring 
semester. Seminars were conducted 
by DR. LEON ALTMAN of the New 
York Psychoanalytic Society, and 
DRS. MONTE JOSEPH, JAMES T. 

Mclaughlin and a. s. vujan of 

the Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic So- 
ciety. Drs. Altman and Joseph had 
been participating in the program 
since last September. 

Throughout the spring and summer 
DR. TAKEY CRIST (Obst. & Gyn.) 
gave formal talks and educational 
lectures on pregnancy, delivery, 
contraception and abortion to differ- 
ent coed groups on our campus as 




I Walton, Parker, Adams and Walker 



4,Heaton, Hayden, Cuttino and Cameron 




^^fSK 



Dr. Parker 




well as to several women civic 
clubs. 

DRS. MAGNUS PISCATOR and 
CARLOS KOZMA visited the Depart- 
ment of Pathology in May and lec- 
tured to its staff and other inter- 
ested persons. Dr. Piscator, from the 
Institute of Hygiene of the Karolin- 
ska Institute in Stockholm, con- 
ducted a seminar on "Cadmium and 
health." Dr. Kozma, director of pa- 
thology at Wellcome Foundation 
(Research Triangle Park, N. C.) 
spoke on "Chagas' Disease." 

The Department of Biochemistry 
sponsored several seminars during 
the spring semester that were con- 
ducted by visiting speakers as well 
as by UNC faculty members. Among 
the guest lecturers were DR. ROY 
VAGELOS, professor and chairman, 
Department of Biological Chemis- 
try, Washington University, St. Louis 
("Studies on the biosynthesis of 
lipids II"); DR. PAUL A. SRERE, 
Basic Biochemistry Unit, VA Hos- 
pital, Dallas ("Structure and me- 
chanisms of citrate cleavage en- 
zyme"); DR. JOHN C. CRAWHALL, 
director of Clinical Biochemistry, 
Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal 



("A variant of Fabry's disease with 
renal glycolipid deposition but with- 
out cutaneous lesions"); DR. WIL- 
LIAM S. LYNN, professor of medi- 
cine and biochemistry, Duke Uni- 
versity School of Medicine ("Role of 
ions in the function of biological 
membranes"); DR. DAVID COLE, 
Department of Biochemistry, Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley 
("Chemistry and metabolism of the 
histones"); DR. WILLIAM E. COR- 
NATZER, Department of Biochemis- 
try, University of North Dakota 
School of Medicine, Grand Forks 
("Phospholipid metabolism"); and 
DR. ROBERT ABELES, Department 
of Biochemistry, Brandeis Univer- 
sity, Waltham, Mass. ("The mechan- 
ism of action of B,- enzymes"). 

DR. WARNER L WELLS (Surgery) 
is author of a chapter of commen- 
tary in a new book entitled "William 
Osier — The Continuing Education," 
published in May by Charles V. 
Thomas Co. Dr. Wells wrote an 
analysis of "Science and War," a 
lecture delivered by Dr. Osier at 
the University of Leeds Medical 
School in 1915 on the increased kill- 
ing power of weapons owed to ad- 
vances in scientific research. 



47 



STUDENT-FACULTY DAY-MAY 9 

10:00 a.m. Memorial Hall— Skits and 
presentation of awards. 

12:30 p.m. Story Book Farm— Picnic. 

8:00 p.m. Legion Hut — Dance. 






Scut Work Keeps Falling on My Head 

Lyrics: J. S. McFadden 

Music: B. Bacharach 
Scut work keeps falling on my iiead 
and I've run the wards until my feet are almost dead, 
track is not for me. 
Scut work keeps falling on my head 
it keeps falling 

So I just did me some talking to the tern 
I asked "Is this the way that medicine should be learned, 
working like a dog?" 
Scut work keeps falling on my head 
it keeps falling 
But there's one thing I know 
the house staff who harass me soon will pass me 
It won't be long til lab technicians fear to sass me 
Scut work keeps falling on my head 
But that doesn't mean my eyes will soon 
be turning red 
Crying's not for me 

I'm never gonna stop the scut by rebuttal 
until I'm free 
When I get my M.D. 




48 



There is a man of some note. 
Who has won our class's vote. 
We award this to him today, 




This is the crowning of the sage of pathology- 





Bugs, worms, virus, and ugly green fungus 

These are the bad things that they spread among us. 

And if you will, it gives us a thrill 

To demonstrate our pathological skill. 



The Pineal Body by Henry Gibson 

Mysterious body up in the brain 
Filling up with ancient sand 
Perhaps we'll learn by our fourth year 

What you're really doing up there. 




The Axillary Sweat Gland by Henry Gibson 

Jungles of hair every where 

It's hard to get a breath of air 
Right Guard, Secret, roll-on Ban 

Make it so hard to be an axillary sweat gland. 



49 




The Professor Award 

DR. CAMPBELL W. McMILLAN (Pediatrics) 



The William deB. MacNider Award (Sophomore) 
THOMAS GRANT IRONS 




The Medical Basic Science Teaching Award 
DR. FREDERIC G. DALLDORF (Pathology) 







^^^kM^TTT^t., :t ^K ^H 


^^^^HA^B''"''' ' -^ 'Sfll^^^H ^ 


^^HHw"^^ J^^n X 




■; mi^^jmt^m^m^^' 



The Henry C. Fordham Award (Resident) 
DR. HENRY M. FARIS, JR. (Medicine) 



The Outstanding Intern Award 

DR. PETER DEVLIN UTSINGER (absent) and 

DR. MICHAEL ARTHUR NEWMAN (Medicine) 




50 




51 



MISS VIRGINIA LONG (Social Serv- 
ice) spent sometime in May at the 
School of Social Work in Teheran 
(Iran) as a guest lecturer to the 
twenty-five supervisors of the stu- 
dent social workers. 
Later that month, Miss Long visited 
Pierce College in Athens where she 
was invited to give consultation at 
their School of Social Work on its 
group sensitivity training course. 
While in Athens, she visited Dr. 
George Vassiliou at the Athenian 
Institute of Anthropos to observe 
his group treatment and to partici- 
pate in the faculty's post group dis- 
cussions. 

Elected by the student body WIL- 
LIAM D. KASSENS, JR. (71), CECIL 
M. "BUSTER" FARRINGTON, JR. 
(72), S. WAYNE SMITH (73) and 
VENITA C. NEWBY (73) will be re- 
spectively president, vice-president, 
treasurer and secretary of the White- 
head Society during the 1970-71 
academic year. 

DR. ROBERT A. BRIGGAMAN (Medi- 
cine) participated in the meetings 
of the Society for Investigative 
Dermatology (Atlantic City, May 2; 
Chicago, June 20), the Dermatology 
Section of the American Medical 
Association (Chicago, June 22-24) 
and the Second Conference on Epi- 
dermal Differentiation (Highland, 
Mich., July 13-16). He presented the 
results of different studies on adult 
human skin. DR. CLAYTON E. 
WHEELER, JR. also attended the 
June meetings. 

Dermatologists CLAYTON E. 
WHEELER and TOMMY B. GRIFFIN 
(Medicine) attended the meeting of 
the Dermatology Section of the 
Medical Society of the State of 
North Carolina (Pinehurst, May 18). 
Dr. Wheeler was a discussant on 
chronic urticaria, herpes simplex, 
lichen planus and drug reactions. 
At this meeting he began his term 
as chairman-elect of the Dermatol- 
ogy Section. 

In May, DR. HAROLD J. FALLON 
(Medicine & Biochemistry) spoke on 
alcoholic liver disease at a Sym- 
posium on Liver Disease held in 
Darby, Penn. and to the Atlanta 
Graduate Medical Assembly. 

Assistant professor of pathology DR. 
WILLIAM D. MOLESTER, resigned 



his position in the school to join the 
staff of the Cape Fear Valley Hos- 
pital in Wilmington, N. C. 

DR. KENNETH SUGIOKA (Anes- 
thesiology) chaired two scientific 
sessions at the Fifth Southeastern 
Anesthesia Residents Conference 
held at the University of Virginia in 
Charlottesville in May. DR. JAMES 
LUCAS, at the time senior resident 
in anesthesiology, spoke at the 
same meetings on 00;^ accumula- 
tion in inspired gases using the 
modified Ayres "T" tube system dur- 
ing spontaneous ventilation. 

DR. JAN HERMANS (Biochemistry) 

presented a paper on "Representa- 
tion of protein molecules in com- 
puter programs" to the Regional 
Crystallography Meetings held in 
Charlottesville, Va., in May. 

Assistant professors FRANK S. 
JOHNSTON, JR. ('59), RICHARD N. 
ANDERSEN and HORTON G. JOLLY 
{'65) resigned their positions in the 
Department of Medicine. Dr. Johns- 
ton entered private practice, Dr. 
•Andersen joined the University of 
Tennessee faculty and Dr. Jolly is 
currently in Winston-Salem at the 
Forsyth Memorial Hospital. 

DR. EDWIN T. PRESTON (Surgery) 
has been appointed Director of Re- 
habilitation. Promoted to assistant 
professor in surgery on June 1st, he 
serves specifically in the Division 
of Orthopedic Surgery. Dr. Preston 
received his undergraduate and 
medical education at Duke Univer- 
sity where he completed his intern- 
ship and a year in a research train- 
ing program. Two years in the U. S. 
Air Force were followed by a re- 
search and training fellowship in 
orthopedics at the Children's Hos- 
pital in Boston. He then spent 3V2 
years as an orthopedic resident in 
the Harvard program at Massachu- 
setts General Hospital, Robert Breck 
Hospital, Children's Hospital and 
Peter Bent Brigham General Hos- 
pital in Boston. He was chief resi- 
dent in orthopedic surgery at the 
latter two institutions prior to his 
coming to Chapel Hill in 1969. 

A Pediatric Symposium sponsored 
by the Division of Physical Therapy 
was held in early June. Guest speak- 
ers at the two-day meeting were: 
DR. WILLIAM F. WINDLE, Depart- 



ment of Anatomy, University of Cali- 
fornia (Los Angeles); DR. MARI- 
ANNE SCHUELEIN, Departments of 
Pediatrics and Neurology, George- 
town University; DR. THOMAS E. 
TWITCHELL, Department of Neurol- 
ogy, Tufts University; DR. MICHAEL 
GAZZANIGA, Department of Psy- 
chology, New York University; DR. 
JANET HARDY, Department of Pedi- 
atrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital; 
and DR. IRWIN M. SIEGEL, Depart- 
ment of Orthopedic Surgery, Uni- 
versity of Illinois. DEAN TAYLOR, 
DR. FLOYD W. DENNY (Pediatrics) 
and MISS MARGARET L MOORE 
(Rhys. Therapy) welcomed the visi- 
tors and MESSRS. DAVID ROHE and 
GARY GARRETT, fellows in pedi- 
atrics in physical therapy education 
here, presented papers. 

DR. WILLIAM P. HOOD (Medicine) 
represented the Division of Cardi- 
ology at the XVII Conference of 
Cardiovascular Training Grant Di- 
rectors, sponsored by the National 
Heart Institute and held in Pocono, 
Penn. on June 5-6. 

DR. ROBERT R. HUNTLEY, who had 
joined our faculty in 1959 and held 
the positions of associate professor 
in the Departments of Preventive 
Medicine and Medicine and assist- 
ant professor of Public Health Ad- 
ministration in the School of Public 
Health, left JNC to become profes- 
sor and chairman of the Department 
of Community Medicine and Inter- 
national Health at Georgetown Uni- 
versity School of Medicine. 

From June 8 to July 3 DR. ROBERT 
A. RICHMAN (Pediatrics) attended 
a course in radioisotopes in re- 
search at Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

DRS. FRANK S. FRENCH, E. MAR- 
TIN RITZEN, LOUIS E. UNDER- 
WOOD, JUDSON J. VAN WYK and 
MISS SANDRA VOINE (Pediatrics) 
and DR. SHIHADEH N. NAYFEH 
(Biochemistry) participated in the 
June meetings of the Endocrine 
Society (St. Louis). Dr. Ritzen pre- 
sented results of studies conducted 
by him and co-workers French and 
Nayfeh on "Cytoplasmic androgen 
receptors in normal and male 
pseudohermaphrodite rats." 

On June 15, DR. PIERRE LEYMARIE, 
from the Research Foundation on 



53 



Hormonology of the University of 
Paris School of iVIedicine, lectured 
on "Progesterone-binding by the 
soluble fraction of corpus luteum 
from the pregnant cow." 
The following day, DR. RENE DE 
HERTOGH, from the Department of 
Medicine of Louvain University 
(Belgium), conducted a seminar on 
"iVIetabolic clearance and tissue 
uptake of estrogens in the nonpreg- 
nant rat." Both speakers were in- 
vited by the Department of Pharma- 
cology. 

Again this summer, the school was 
represented at the hospital manage- 
ment course of the King's Fund Col- 
lege of Hospital Administration in 
London. DR. ROBERT SMITH 
(Family Medicine) was a member of 
the faculty and MESSRS. STEVEN 
P. DEWEES, WILLIAM D. KASSENS 
(71), CECIL M. FARRINGTON, 
RICHARD C. TAFT, J. RICHARD 
YOUNG (72) and FRANK E. DAVIS 
III (73) took the course sponsored 
by the Duke Endowment Foreign 
Fellowship program. Nine other 
medical and hospital administration 
students from North and South Caro- 
lina attended the course. DEAN 
TAYLOR visited the college while 
the special training was underway 
and participated in some of the 
activities. 

While in London, Dr. Smith deliv- 
ered the Albert Wander Lecture at 
the Royal Society of Medicine (June 
m. 

Fifty allied health educators at- 
tended the Division of Physical 
Therapy workshop "Inter-institution- 
al Agreements in the Education of 
the Allied Health Professions" held 
on June 22-24. The various aspects 
of the clinical education of students 
in the allied health professions were 
discussed, including legal implica- 
tions and responsibilities as well as 
types — and preparation — of agree- 
ments between a clinical facility 
and a school. The participants 
represented 19 states. 

DR. ROBERT A. GOYER (Pathology) 
attended the IV Annual Conference 
on Trace Substances in Environ- 
mental Health held at the Univer- 
sity of Missouri, Columbia, on June 
25. He spoke on the "Pathobiology 
of the kidney in lead poisoning." 



DR. ROBERT A. ROSS retired this 
summer after 18 years as a member 
of the Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. "Daddy" Ross was the 
original chairman of this depart- 
ment, having joined the faculty at 
UNC in 1952 at the time of the ex- 
pansion of the school to a four year 
institution. He served as a professor 
and chairman of the department 
until 1965 when he relinquished the 
chair but continued his position as 
professor in the department. Prior 
to his coming to UNC, Dr. Ross had 
been an Assistant Professor in the 
Department of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology at Duke University School of 
Medicine (1930-1952) except for a 
period when he rose from the rank 
of Lt. Commander to Captain in the 
U. S. Naval Reserve (1940-1946). He 
is presently a Rear Admiral in the 
Naval Medical Corps Reserve. 

Throughout his career Dr. Ross has 
served on numerous and varied 
local and national committees and 
boards having presided the Ameri- 
can Genecological Society, The 
South Atlantic Association of Ob- 
stetricians and Gynecologists and 
The North Carolina Genecologic So- 
ciety. 

Distinguished by his wit and wis- 
dom. Dr. Ross has been fondly ad- 
mired by his students, fellovi/ faculty 
members and patients alike, as at- 
tested by the universality with 



%, 
"X-. 



*%,^ 




which he is known by his nickname 
"Daddy" and by the existence of the 
Robert A. Ross Society of Obste- 
tricians and Gynecologists. 



On June 30, DR. CLARICE A. REBER 

resigned his position as instructor 
of surgery. 

DR. JAMES R. PICK (Pathology) at- 
tended a Symposium on Recent Ad- 
vances in Studies in Alcoholism, 
held in Washington in June. In the 
same month, he participated in the 
American Veterinary Medical Asso- 
ciation meeting (Las Vegas) as a 
member of the Board of Directors 
of the American College of Labora- 
tory Animal Medicine. Dr. Pick be- 
came secretary-treasurer of the Col- 
lege in July. 

Dr. Pick has been elected to serve 
on two committees of the Institute 
of Laboratory Animal Resources of 
the National Academy of Sciences: 
the Committee on Laboratory Ani- 
mal Diseases and the Committee on 
Laboratory Animal Ethnology. 



The Department of Preventive Medi- 
cine has become the Department of 
Family Medicine, it will continue to 
be chaired by DR. ROBERT SMITH. 

Assistant professor CLIFFORD B. 
REIFLER, who held positions in the 
Department of Psychiatry as well as 
in the School of Public Health, re- 
signed in July to assume the direc- 
torship of the University Health 
Services at Rochester University in 
New York. Dr. Reifler had joined our 
faculty in 1963. 

The UNC Neurobiology Program has 
been awarded a five-year $449,320 jj 
training grant from the National In- ] 
stitutes of Mental Health. DR. ED- ^ 
WARD GLASSMAN (Biochemistry) 
directs the interdisciplinary pro- 
gram which comprises 11 depart- 
ments throughout the university, 
eight in the School of Medicine. 



54 



New Appointments (March-August) 
DR. JEFFREY J. ANDRESEN, in- 
structor in psyciiiatry. 
DR. DAVID R. BROWN, assistant 
professor of anesthesiology. 
DR. JOSEPH A. BUCKWALTER, pro- 
fessor of surgery. 

DR. MICHAEL CAPLOW, associate 
professor of biochemistry. 
DR. CHARLES N. CARNEY, assistant 
professor of pathology. 
DR. TAKEY CRIST, assistant pro- 
fessor of obstetrics and gynecology. 
DR. ALBERT M. COLLIER, instructor 
and trainee in pediatrics. 
DR. ROSWELL D. DANIELS, clinical 
associate professor of family medi- 
cine. 

DR. ABDULLAH FATTEH, associate 
professor of pathology. 
DR. ARTHUR L FINN, associate 
professor of medicine. 
DR. JOHN I. FISHBURNE, JR., in- 
structor in obstetrics and gynecol- 
ogy. 

DR. MERREL D. FLAIR, associate 
professor of psychiatry and director. 
Office of Medical Studies. 
DR. FLOYD A. FRIED, professor of 
surgery. 

DR. LESTER D. GRANT, instructor 
in psychiatry. 

DR. DOUGLAS I. HAMMER, clinical 
instructor in medicine. 
MR. WILLIAM G. HARRIS, assistant 
to the dean. 

DR. DUDLEY F. HAWKES, instructor 
in surgery. 

DR. WILLIAM D. HEIZER, assistant 
professor of medicine. 
DR. AKIHIRO UNO, visiting assist- 
ant professor of anatomy. 
DR. ANDREW M. JOHNSON, assist- 
ant professor of pediatrics. 
DR. ROGER E. JOHNSONBAUGH, 
instructor in pediatrics. 
DR. ROBERT S. LAWRENCE, assist- 
ant professor of medicine. 
DR. NADIA N. MALOUF, instructor 
in pathology. 

DR. KEIJI MARUSHIGE, assistant 
professor of biochemistry. 
DR. LAWRENCE W. MOORE, JR., in- 
structor in ophthalmology. 
DR. MEIHAN NONOYAMA, research 
assistant professor of bacteriology. 
DR. RAYMOND L PAINE, instructor 
in psychiatry. 

DR. M. STEVEN PIVER, assistant 
professor of obstetrics and gynecol- 
ogy. 

DR. SAMUEL M. PUTNAM, instruc- 
tor in medicine. 



DR. HOWARD A. SCHNEIDER, pro- 
fessor of biochemistry. 
DR. CHARLES P. SCHUCH, assist- 
ant professor of physical therapy. 
DR. MYRON S. SILVERMAN, profes- 
sor of bacteriology and School of 
Dentistry. 

DR. HAROLD C. SMITH, assistant 
professor of surgery. 
DR. WALTER E. STUMPF, associate 
professor of anatomy. 
DR. ROY V. TALMAGE, professor of 
surgery. 

DR. AKIRA TAMURA, visiting assist- 
ant professor of bacteriology. 
DR. CATHERINE A. TAYLOR, assist- 
ant professor of psychiatry. 
DR. HARRY L. TAYLOR (Pathology), 
instructor in bacteriology. 
DR. MARJORIE A. WEXLER, instruc- 
tor in bacteriology. 
MR. GLEN I. WILSON, associate 
dean for Community Health Services 
and associate professor of family 
medicine. 

DR. LOUIS C. WILSON, instructor 
in surgery. 

DR. RICHARD V. WOLFENDEN, as- 
sociate professor of biochemistry. 
DR. WILLIAM J. YOUNT, associate 
professor of medicine. 

Promotions 
To professor: 

WILLIAM B. BLYTHE (Medicine). 
HARRIE R. CHAMBERLIN (Pediat- 
rics). 

J. WILBERT EDGERTON (Psychia- 
try) 

HAROLD J. FALLON (Medicine & 
Pharmacology). 

HERBERT S. HARNED, JR. (Pediat- 
rics). 

LOUIS S. HARRIS (Pharmacology). 
JOHN C. HERION (Medicine). 
JAN HERMANS (Biochemistry). 
PHILIP F. HIRSCH (Pharmacology). 
CORNELIUS T. KAYLOR (Anatomy). 
WILLIAM E. LASSITER (Medicine). 
ROBERT L NEY (Medicine & Physi- 
ology). 

PAUL A. OBRIST (Psychiatry). 
HAROLD R. ROBERTS (Pathology & 
Medicine). 

ROBERT SMITH (Fam. Medicine). 
RICHARD I. WALKER (Medicine). 
To associate professor: 
JOHN C. PARKER (Medicine & Bio- 
chemistry). 

ROBERT SMITH (Medicine) 
DONALD M. WOOD (Psychiatry). 
To assistant professor: 
JOSEPH F. APONTE (Psychiatry). 



WILLIAM E. BRENNER (Obst. Gyn.). 
CHI-BOM CHAE (Biochemistry). 
JAMES D. FOLDS (Bacteriology). 
GEORGE C. HEMINGWAY, JR. (Pedi- 
atrics). 

STANLEY R. MANDEL (Surgery). 
EDWIN T. PRESTON (Surgery). 
RICHARD W. SHERMER (Pathology). 
FRED D. SUMMERS, JR. (Obst. 
Gyn). 
LOUIE E. UNDERWOOD (Pediatrics). 




This summer DR. PAUL L. MUNSON 
(Pharmacology) was appointed 
Sarah Graham Kenan Professor, one 
of the top honors a UNC faculty 
member can receive. Dr. Munson, 
who holds B.A. (Antioch College), 
M.A. (Wisconsin University), Ph.D. 
(Chicago University) and Hon. M.A. 
(Harvard University) degrees, has 
chaired the Department of Pharma- 
cology since 1965. He was elected 
secretary-treasurer-elect and mem- 
ber of the council of the American 
Society of Pharmacology and Ex- 
perimental Therapeutics (assuming 
the position July 1) and president 
of the UNC Chapter of the Society 
of Sigma Xi. 

Among other Sigma Xi officers elect- 
ed were DR. GEORGE K. SUMMER 
(Biochemistry & Pediatrics), treas- 
urer, and DR. CLAUDE PIANTIDOSI 
(Sch. of Pharm. & Biochemistry), 
member-at-large. 

DRS. JOSEPH S. PAGANO (Medicine 
& Bacteriology), FLOYD W. DENNY 
(Pediatrics) and CHARLES E. MOR- 
RIS (Medicine) were granted one- 
year leaves of absence. 
In July, Dr. Pagano joined the staff 
of Dr. Roger Weil's laboratory in the 
Department of Biophysics of the 
University of Geneva. He was elect- 



55 



ed to membership in the American 
Society for Clinical Investigation at 
the organization's annual meeting 
in Atlantic City (May). 
Dr. Denny will travel to England in 
September to conduct research at 
Dr. David Tyrrell's laboratories in 
the Medical Research Council of the 
Clinical Research Center in London. 
Dr. Morris will go to Agana (Guam) 
in September, where he will be the 
neurologist-in-charge at the Na- 
tional Institute of Neurological Dis- 
eases and Stroke Research Center. 
He will carry out clinical investiga- 
tions on amyotrophic lateral sclero- 
sis and Parkinsonism-dementia in 
the chamorro natives of Guam. 

DR. KENNETH MURRAY of the 
Laboratory of Molecular Biology at 
Cambridge University conducted a 
seminar on "Histones of chicken 
erythrocytes" on July 23. Dr. Murray 
visited the school by invitation of 
the Department of Biochemistry. 

Pathology department members 
DRS. K. M. BRINKHOUS, REGINALD 
G. MASON, HAROLD R. ROBERTS 
(also Medicine), WILLIAM P. WEB- 
STER (also Sch. Dentistry), and 
MISS SILVIA HINNOM participated 
in the meetings of the International 
Committee on Haemostasis and 
Thrombosis held in Montreux, 
Switzerland (July 29-August 1) in 
conjunction with the I Conference 
of the International Society of 
Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Some 
of the above mentioned coagulation- 
ists also attended and presented 
papers at the VI Congress of the 
World Federation of Hemophilia 
(Baden, Austria, July 25-27) and/or 
the XIII International Congress of 
Hematology (Munich, Germany, 
August 2-8). 

"Regulation of adrenal medullary 
and sympathetic neuronal tyrosine 
hydroxylase activity" was the topic 
of a seminar given by DR. ROBERT 
A. MUELLER, from the Department 
of Anesthesiology at Northwestern 
University Medical School (Chicago), 
on July 28. The seminar was co- 
sponsored by the Departments of 
Anesthesiology and Pharmacology. 

National Board Examinations 

Members of both the classes of 
1972 and 1973 distinguished them- 
selves in their National Board exam- 
inations during the spring. Their 



average grades were above the na- 
tional mean in both anatomy and 
biochemistry for the class of 1973 
and in pathology, pharmacology, 
and bacteriology for the class of 
1972. In each of these subjects the 
percentage of the class obtaining 
honor grades was almost twice that 
of the percentage of national board 
candidates taken as a whole. The 
faculty is extremely proud of the 
performance of these students and 
is grateful for the distinction that 
they have brought to our school. 

DR. CARL B. LYLE, JR. (Medicine) 
began a two-year leave of absence 
on August 1. Dr. Lyie will work with 
a group practice in Charlotte to de- 
velop new and improve older 
methods of delivery of primary 
medical care. 

DR. LOUIS E. UNDERWOOD (Pedi- 
atrics) attended a Short Course in 



Medical Genetics at Bar Harbor, 
Me., on August 3-14. 

DR. JOHN A. EWING (Psychiatry) 

has become chairman of the Scien- 
tific Program Committee of the 
American Psychiatric Association. 
The next meeting of the association 
will be held in Washington, D. C. in 
May, 1971. 

Dr. Ewing spent three weeks in 
August at the Maudsley Hospital in 
London, carrying out research on 
alcohol and drug dependence. A 
particular objective of his work at 
Maudsley Hospital was to test a new 
instrument he developed at UNC for 
identifying "hidden" alcoholics 
when they are admitted to a hos- 
pital or seek a physician's help with 
complaints other than alcoholism. 

DR. HARRY L DERR, JR. left the 
university as of August 31. He was 
a clinical assistant professor of 




DR. JOHN H. FERGUSON retired as 
a member of the Department of 
Physiology after 27 years, 24 of 
which he served as chairman of the 
department. Born in Scotland— but 
raised in South Africa — he was a 
Rhode? Scholar at Oxford and ob- 
tained his M.D. at Harvard Univer- 
sity (1928). He taught at the univer- 
sities of Capetown, Harvard, Yale, 
Alabama and Michigan. 
In 36 years of research, mainly in 
the field of blood coagulation and 
related problems, he published over 



158 papers and three monographs. 
In 1957, his original alma mater, the 
University of Cape Town, awarded 
him the D.Sc. degree. Besides re- 
ceiving academic honors and schol- 
arships in his student days, he has 
been associated with many local, 
national and international profes- 
sional societies. 

Dr. Ferguson's ties with the school 
will not be severed completely, he 
has been appointed lecturer in the 
department he steered so devotedly 
for such long years. 



56 



social work in the Department of 
Psychiatry and an assistant profes- 
sor of social work in the Division of 
Allied Education. 

Assistant professors JULIAN H. 
CAPPS, II (Radiology) and MYRON 
B. LIPTZIN (Psychiatry) resigned 
their positions in the school to go 
into private practice. Dr. Capps has 
gone to Corpus Christi, Texas, and 
Dr. Liptzin to Washington, D. C. 

Two long-term members of the De- 
partment of Pathology will resign 
their positions in September to join 
the faculty of the University of Iowa 
College of Medicine. DR. GEORGE 
D. PENICK ('44) will head the de- 
partment of pathology there and 
DR. NATHANIEL F. RODMAN will 
assume a professorship in the same 
department. 



During his 21 years at UNC he was 
a member of many key committees, 
in the school as well as in the gen- 
eral university, chairing some of 
them. It was in great part due to his 
efforts as chairman of the Medical 
School Bulletin Committee that The 
Bulletin became what it is today. 
A concerned teacher who considers 
student participation in certain 
policy making affairs a vital part of 
education, he was responsible for 
the student membership in the 
Qommittee on Admissions (which 
he chaired from 1968 until this sum- 
mer) and influenced their repre- 
sentation in other committees. 
Dr. Penick has also been an active 
member of local, national and inter- 
national societies. 




Dr. Penick did his undergraduate 
studies in Chapel Hill and attended 
the two-year medical school here, 
transferring to Harvard Medical 
School where he received the M.D. 
degree in 1946. He began his aca- 
demic career when he returned to 
the Hill as an instructor in pathol- 
ogy in 1949. A Markle Scholar in 
Medicine, he became a full profes- 
sor in 1963. His primary research 
interest through the years has per- 
tained to the metabolism of plasma 
factor VIII, field in which he has 
published over 60 articles. He was 
the director of the NIH Thrombosis 
and Hemorrhage Program Project at 
UNC since the beginning of the pro 
gram in 1962 until his departure. He 
also was the principal investigator 
on a John A. Hartford Foundation 
grant carrying out organ transplan- 
tation studies in hemophilia. 



Dr. Rodman attended MIT for a 
year, transferring to Princeton Uni- 
versity where he received a B.A. de- 
gree in 1947. He holds an M.D. de- 
gree from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania School of Medicine ('51). He 
came to UNC in 1952 as a resident 
in pathology, served a two year 
period with the Navy and returned 
in 1955 to complete his residency, 
becoming a member of the pathol- 
ogy staff in 1958. He was an associ- 
ate professor when he left our 
faculty. 

A productive investigator, he is 
mainly interested in electron micro- 
scopic studies of blood platelets 
and elucidation of their role in pre- 
venting abnormal bleeding. His 
bibliography surpasses the count 
of 30. 

Dr. Rodman is the recipient of a 
Research Career Development 
Award and a member of local, na- 
tional and international organiza- 
tions. 



Freshman-Junior Honors and 
Awards, 1969-70 

Morehead Fellows, Class of 73: 

DAVID ALAN GRIMES 

DALE ALAN NEWTON 

JAMES WILLARD STRATTON 

Life Insurance Medical Research 

Fellow: 

DON ALEXANDER GABRIEL 72 

The Riggins Merit Scholarship: 

GEORGE TERRY STEWART '71 

Alumni Merit Scholarships: 

ENSER WILLIAM COLE III 71 

THOMAS GRANT IRONS '72 

CAMERON LANGLEY SMITH '71 

RONALD JAY STANLEY '72 

Foreign Fellowships: 

ROBERT LUTHER BARNES III '72 

NEIL CHAFETS 71 

JOHN VIKRAM THOMAS '72 

JOHN FREDERICK WOLFE '72 

MICHAEL FRANCIS YARBOROUGH 

'72 
The Heusner Pupil Award: 
WALTER RAY GAMMON '71 
The William deB. MacNider Award: 
THOMAS GRANT IRONS '72 
Other students were recognized by 
AOA (p. 46), the Duke Endowment 
Foreign Fellowship program (p. 54) 
and the Student Research Paper 
Awards Committee (p. 46). 



57 



THE FOURTH MERRIMON LECTURE 




DR. JOHN H. KNOWLES, professor of medicine at 
Harvard iVIedical Sciiooi and general director of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, is to visit the School 
of Medicine and deliver the Fourth Merrimon Lecture 
on November 3, 1970. Entitled "The Watershed of the 
1970's," this lecture will be given in the Great Hall of 
the Student Union Building. 

The bequest establishing the Merrimon Lectureship 
specifies that lecturers are to be distinguished in their 
profession both by an humane attitude tov^^ard the 
practice of medicine and by scientific and clinical 
distinction. In the tradition of previous lecturers, Dr. 
Knowles clearly combines these qualifications. 
A graduate of Harvard College and Washington Uni- 
versity School of Medicine, Dr. Knowles received post- 
graduate training in internal medicine at Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. Appointed to the Harvard 
Medical School faculty in 1959, he became director 
of the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1962. This 
appears to have been the "watershed" of his major 
career interests. Prior to 1963, his publications dealt 
with pulmonary disease, and although these continued 
for a while, they soon became interdigitated with titles 
dealing with the delivery of medical care. For example, 
"The Social Conscience and the Primary Function of 
the Hospital Viewed in Historical Perspective," in the 
Pharos, was followed by "The Balanced Biology of the 
Teaching Hospital" in the New England Journal of 



58 



Meaicine. 

Many of Dr. Knowles' interesting and provocative ideas 
on the delivery of medical care can be related to his 
active commitment to the premise that "medicine is 
a social as well as a biological science" and must 
"develop a holistic concept of the community health 
if it is to prevent disease, maintain health, and en- 
hance the quality of life." His concerns include re- 
search in delivery of medical care and education of 
future physicians to a broader view of that particular 
subject. 

The breadth of his own interests are attested by some 
of his current diverse activities. As professor of medi- 
cine, he continues to conduct ward round and was 
author last year of one of the "Case Records of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital" in the New England 
Journal of Medicine. He serves as research associate 
to the Program on Technology and Society at Harvard 
College, a member of the Board of Directors of the 
Harvard Community Health Plan, Inc., and a visiting 
faculty fellow at the Harvard College Institute of 
Politics. He is a fellow of the American College of 
Physicians, the American Academy of Arts and Sci- 
ences, and the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Sciences. He is also a member of the Royal 
Society for the Promotion of Health. In 1969 he was 
awarded an honorary LL.D. degree by Northeastern 
University. 



I 



Alumni News 



OFFICERS AND COUNCILLORS 1971-72 

President— Charles L Herring '55, Kinston, N. C.f 
President-Elect— Harold L. Godwin '45, Fayetteville, N. C.ft 
Vice-President— Lewis S. Thorp, Jr. '50, Rocky IVIounty, N. C.ft 
Secretary— Hugh C. Hemmings '54, IVIorganton, N. C.f 
Treasurer— James H. M. Thorp '57, Rocky Mount, N. C* 

Councillors 

North Carolina: 

District I— Samuel G. Jenkins '55, Elizabeth Cityft 

District II— Charles J. Sawyer III '63, Ahoskie* 

District III— Cornelius T. Partrick '54, Washington! 

District IV— John L McCain '50, Wilsonff 

District V — Charles P. Nicholson, House Staff, Morehead Cityf 

District VI— J. Clin Perritt '50, Wilmington* 

District VII— S. Malone Parham '43D, Henderson* 

District VIM— Vernon Watson Pugh '51, Raleighff 

District IX— Joseph W. Baggett '430, Fayettevilleft 

District X— George Johnson, Jr. '50, Chapel Hill* 

District XI— Robert M. McMillan '36, Southern Pines* 

District XII— Samuel B. Joyner '55, Greensborof 

District XIII— Julian S. Albergotti, Jr. '55, Charlotteff 

District XIV— F. A. (Ted) Blount '42, Winston-Salem* 

District XV— Edward B. McKenzie '49, Saiisburyf 

District XVI— J. Iverson Riddle '56, Morgantonf 

District XVII— Dean C. Jones, Jr. '56, Jefferson* 

District XVIII— Rodney L McKnight '55, Shelbyff 

District XIX— Zebulon Weaver III '61, Asheville* 

District XX— Daniel H. Seals '51, Sylvaft 

Out-of-state— Charles E. Flowers, Jr. '43M, Birmingham, Ala.ft 

Councillors At-Large 

John Gotten Tayloe, Jr. '60, New Bern* 
George D. Penick '44, Chapel Hillf 
Alton James Coppridge '51, Durhamff 
G. Reginald Tucker, Jr. '55, Hendersonff 
Abram Hewitt Rose, Jr. '48, Raleighff 



* Elected 1968 

t Elected 1969 

tt Elected 1970 




President Herring 



VISITING COMMITTEE 1970-71 

Chairman— John R. Chambliss 'M43 

Co-Chairman— G. Reginald Tucker '55 

Julian S. Albergotti, Jr. '55 

F. A. (Ted) Blount '42 

Isaac V. Manly '44 

William W. McLendon '56 

Charles P. Nicholson (House Staff 

'60) 

John S. Rhodes '27 

Zebulon Weaver III '61 

Medical Alumni Association: 
1970-71 Officers: 
Charles L. Herring '55 
Harold L. Godwin '45 
Lewis S. Thorp, Jr. '50 
Hugh C. Hemmings '54 
James H. M. Thorp '57 

Immediate Past-Presidents: 
H. Haynes Baird '40 
James E. Davis '42 
H. McLeod Riggins '22 



59 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
April 30-May 1, 1970 




60 




61 




62 




8:00 p.m. NCMH, Clinic Auditorium 

Hodges Lecture: "Hypertrophic Subaortic Stenosis- 
Some Clinical and Hemodynamic Features and the 
Results of Operative Treatment." 
Andrew G. Morrow, M.D., Chief, Clinic of Surgery, 
National Heart and Lung Institute. 



63 



May 1 

9:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m. NCMH, Clinic Auditorium 

Presiding: H. Haynes Baird, IVl.D. '40, President, Medi- 
cal Alumni Association.' 

Introduction— George Johnson, M.D. '50*, Chief, Divi- 
sion of Vascular and Traumatic Surgery.^ 

"Ambulatory Care"— James A. Bryan, M.D.*, Chief, 
Ambulatory Facility.3 

"Ambulatory Facility"— Mr. Clarence Cauble, NCMH 
Assistant Director in Charge of Ambulatory Facility.* 

"The Clinical Research Unit"— William B. BIythe, M.D. 
'51*, Chief C.R.U.5 

"Laboratories for Reproductive Biology"— H. Stanley 
Bennett, M.D.*, Chairman, Department of Anatomy 
and Director, LRB.e 

"Air Transportation" — Col. Earl Provancha*, Chief 
Pilot.7 

"Library Acquisitions"— Miss Myrl Ebert*, Chief Li- 
brarian. s 

"New Operating Room"— Kenneth Sugioka, M.D.*, Act- 
ing Chairman, Department of Anesthesiology. ^ 

"Drug Breakthrough"— Paul L. Munson, Ph.D.*, Chair- 
man, Department of Pharmacology.'° 

Questions and Answers. 

*UNC School of Medicine and/or NCMH. 




Speakers: 4, 9, 8, 7, 6, 10, 3, 1, 5 and 2. 




Incoming President Herring and Vice President Godwin with 
outgoing President Baird. 




12:30-2:30 p.m. Carolina Inn, Ball Room 
Luncheon and Annual Business Meeting. 
Presiding: H. Haynes Baird, M.D. '40. 
A Tribute to the Members Who Have Died 

During the Past Year. 
Report of the Visiting Committee. 
Other Old or New Business. 
Report of the Nominating Committee. 
Report on the School— Dean Isaac M. 

Taylor, M.D. 
Adjournament. 
3:00-5:00 p.m. 
NCMH— Tours of New Facilities. 



64 



I 






5:30-9:30 p.m. Carolina Inn, Ball Room. 
Social Hour and Alumni Dinner. 

Presiding: H. Haynes Baird, M.D. '40. 

Welcome: Dean Isaac M. Taylor, M.D. 

Addresses: Mr. T. Reed Underhill 70, President, 
Whitehead Medical Society.' 

H. Haynes Baird, M.D. '40, President, Medical Alumni 
Association. 
Presentation of Twenty Five-Year Certificates to the 

Class of 1945.2 
"Quo Vadimus?"— Howard A. Patterson, M.D. '23.3 
Presentation of Distinguished Service Awards 
Honoring 

W. Eugene Cornatzer, Ph.D. '44, M.D. 

Charles E. Flowers, Jr., M.D. '43 

Miss Grizzelle M. Norfleet 

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority 

Henry S. Willis, M.D. 




65 




66 



The Distinguished Service Award was established in 1955 on 
the 75th anniversary of the founding of the School of Medicine 
to recognize those who contributed importantly to the estab- 
lishment and early growth of the four-year medical school. The 
award was designed to honor as well alumni and friends whose 
distinguished careers and unselfish contributions to society 
have added luster and prestige to the University and its School 
of Medicine. 

A committee appointed by the Dean of the School of Medicine 
selects the recipients from nominations solicited from the 
medical faculty and members of the Medical Alumni Associ- 
ation. Faculty members are not eligible for this award unless 
unusual circumstances demand it. 




Dr. William Eugene Cornatzer was 

born in Mocksville, North Carolina, 
on September 23, 1918. He received 
a B.S. degree from Wake Forest Col- 
lege in 1939 and an M.S. and Ph.D. 
in Biochemistry from UNC in 1941 
and 1944, respectively. 
As an Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry at the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine (1945), he di- 
rected some of his energies toward 
studies in clinical medicine. This 
led to his receiving the M.D. degree 
from that institution in 1951. 
While at Bowman Gray, Dr. Cornat- 
zer was influenced by Dr. Camillo 
Artom, one of the world's foremost 
lipid chemists. The importance of 
his subsequent research on the 
metabolism of lipids and phospho- 
lipids was recognized by the Ameri- 
can Medical Association in 1951 by 
presentation of the Billings Award. 
In addition, he has made important 
contributions in the development of 
liver function tests and in the study 
of biochemical effects of radiation. 
Dr. Cornatzer was appointed Profes- 
sor and Head of the Department of 
Biochemistry at the University of 
North Dakota School of Medicine in 
1951. He played an important role in 
the establishment of the Ireland Re- 
search Laboratories at that univer- 
jsity and is currently Director of 
these laboratories. He is a member 
bf the American Board of Clinical 



Chemists, the Biochemical Testing 
Committee of the National Board of 
Medical Examiners, and a consult- 
ant to the Medical Division of the 
Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Stud- 
ies. 




Dr. Charles Ely Flowers, Jr., was 

born in Zebulon, North Carolina, on 
July 20, 1920. He received a B.S. 
from The Citadel in 1941, a Certifi- 
cate in Medicine from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina School of 
Medicine in 1943, and an M.D. from 
Johns Hopkins University in 1944. 
Dr. Flowers was the first member of 
UNC Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology recruited by Dr. Robert 
A. Ross, then Chairman, in the sum- 
mer of 1952. From that time until 
his departure fourteen years later, 
he proved to be an excellent 
teacher, superb clinician and pro- 
ductive clinical investigator. His 
outstanding talents as an adminis- 
trator aided in stabilizing the new 
department and the sound growth 
of its faculty and students. 
In 1966 Dr. Flowers accepted the 
chairmanship of the Department of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology at the 
Baylor University School of Medi- 
cine in Houston, Texas. During the 
two and one-half years of his tenure 
at Baylor, he reorganized the de- 
partment, improving the undergrad- 
uate and house officer teaching, as 



well as the status of the residency. 
He gained the respect and confi- 
dence not only of the members of 
his department but also of the 
faculty in general and of the prac- 
ticing gynecologists in Houston who 
had no connection with Baylor. 
At present Dr. Flowers is Professor 
and Chairman of the Department of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology of the 
University of Alabama School of 
Medicine where enthusiasm runs 
high for his recruitment of faculty 
and for the progress made in the 
department since his arrival at 
Birmingham. 

In 1959 Dr. Flowers received the Dis- 
tinguished Service Plaque from the 
North Carolina Division of the 
American Cancer Society and in 
1964 the Distinguished Service 
Plaque from the United Cerebral 
Palsv of North Carolina. 




Miss Grizzelle Mitchell Norfleet, a 

native of Winston-Salem, has long 
devoted much of her time, thought, 
and energy to improving the condi- 
tion of orthopedically handicapped 
children and adults in North Caro- 
lina. 

Miss Norfleet received her A.B. de- 
gree at Salem College and B.S. and 
M.S. degrees at Columbia Univer- 
sity. Outstanding among her early 
contributions was a major role in 
establishing an institution in Dur- 



67 



ham for the treatment of children 
with cerebral palsy; an outgrowth 
of this project is the Duke-connect- 
ed, state-supported N. C. Cerebral 
Palsy Hospital in Durham. In 1952, 
when the School of IVIedicine at 
UNC was expanded from two to 
four years and the N. C. Memorial 
Hospital was opened. Miss Norfieet 
began a long series of meaningful 
contributions to the development of 
orthopedic surgery, orthopedic re- 
habilitation, physical therapy, and 
allied services in Chapel Hill. She 
has been responsible for the acqui- 
sition of treatment facilities, fellow- 
ships, travel funds, and book collec- 
tions. Her assistance alone made 
possible the establishment of the 
North Carolina Memorial Hospital 
brace shop in 1959 and its subsequ- 
ent development into one of the 
very few full-time orthotics and 
prosthetics centers in academic 
institutions in America. 
Miss Norfieet — Dell, as she is known 
to her many devoted friends — has 
worked personally with crippled 
children, followed them in state 
clinics, and attended many courses 
and seminars on their treatment. 
She is a diligent student of all as- 
pects of the locomotor system, and 
in 1969 was author of a book entitled 
Motor Concepts in Muscle Training. 
She is a warm-hearted, modest, 
highly constructive member of a 
number of institutional committees 
and boards dedicated to the physi- 
cally handicapped citizens of North 
Carolina. 




The Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority 

has devoted for many years a major 
portion of its energies to improving 
the care and treatment of the sick 
children of North Carolina. At the 
North Carolina Memorial Hospital, 
this has been done through the 
Robbie Page Memorial which was 
established in 1951 in memory of 




interest in innumerable ways in im- 
proving the health and welfare of 
children at NCMH. 



Robbie Page, son of Mary Hastings 
Page, national president of the So- 
rority at the time of his death. 
The Sorority provided funds to the 
hospital for the construction of a 
model playroom on the children's 
ward. This was accompanied by 
funds for a conference room and 
library for physicians, house staff 
and students caring for children. 
Since then, the Sorority has sup- 
ported the building of a 10-bed iso- 
lation unit for children and recently 
a playroom in the new Ambulatory 
Facility. This playroom for children 
visiting an out-patient clinic is a 
step into the future and is probably 
the only one of its kind. At present 
an intensive-care unit for the chil- 
dren's ward is in the final stages of 
planning. 

In addition to funds for construc- 
tion, the Sorority has also sup- 
ported, with monies and volunteer 
personnel, the development of a 
play program which has now ex- 
tended from the main children's 
ward to all areas of NCMH where 
children are hospitalized, including 
Gravely Sanatorium and the out- 
patient department. The play pro- 
gram has become such an integral 
part of the overall program for chil- 
dren that an academic program of 
play therapy has been developed in 
association with the Recreation Cur- 
riculum of the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Financial 
support from the Sorority has al- 
lowed the addition of personnel to 
run the play program over the years 
since its inception. A fellowship 
fund has also been established by 
the Tri Sigmas to support young 
people who are working toward ad- 
vanced degrees in therapeutic rec- 
reation. 

Possibly the greatest support given 
by the chapters throughout the 
country has been their concern and 




^♦i« 



Dr. Henry Stuart Willis is a native of 
High Point, North Carolina. He re- 
ceived an A.B. degree from UNC in 
1914 and earned both an M.D. and 
an M.A. at Johns Hopkins University 
in 1919 and 1920, respectively. 
The character and philosophy of 
Henry Stuart Willis was apparent 
when, as an undergraduate at UNC,- 
he instituted an evening program 
for the education of illiterate non- 
academic university employees. In 
the years since then his scholarly 
activities, progressive attitudes, and 
warm human characteristics have 
continued to the present where he 
stands as one of the most eminent 
individuals in the field of tubercu- 
losis. His contributions to the field 
of the basic microbiology and pa- 
thology of tuberculosis, the field of 
applied immunology of tuberculosis, 
and the clinical and administrative 
activities in pulmonary medicine 
have been outstanding. He is the 
author of several books and mono- 
graphs, and his bound reprints fill 
two large volumes. The quality of 
these publications is as impressive 
as the number. Even in retirement 
his contributions to the university 
and to medicine in general continue 
and are particularly valuable in view 
of his progressive outlook combined 
with his extensive experience. 
Dr. Willis is a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can College of Physicians, a mem- 
ber of the Association of American 
Pathologists and Bacteriologists, 
the American Public Health Associ- 
ation, the American Clinical and 
Climatological Association, the Na- 
tional Tuberculosis Association, and 
the American Thoracic Society to 
name a few. In 1956 he received the 
Southern Tuberculosis Conference 
Award and in 1960 the Brace Doug- 
las Award. 



68 



ALUMNI NECROLOGY 

ELIZABETH IRVING CHRISTIAN '31— Trenton, N.J. 
DAVID ALEXANDER COOPER '19— Wynnewood, Pa. 
ROBERT DRANE '11— Savannah, Ga. 
ARTHUR BROWN ENGLISH '04— Bristol, N.C. 
EARL STUART HUNTLEY, JR. '51— Miami, Fla. 
ROBERT FRANKLIN KEADLE '41— Hagerstown, Md. 
DUNCAN ROLAND McEACHERN '30— Wilmington, N.C. 
HARRY BLAKE SHERRILL '54— Sneads Ferry, N.C. 
ROGER SHORE SIDDALL '18— Winston-Salem, N.C. 
RIVES WILLIAM TAYLOR '24— Oxford, N.C. 
WILLIAM TROY TURLINGTON, JR. '27— Jacksonville, N.C. 
ZACK JAMES WATERS '27— Salisbury, Md. 



69 



ATTENTION, RESIDENTS, INTERNS And SENIOR STUDENTS 

WE HAVE SERVED THE MEDICAL PROFESSION OF NORTH 
CAROLINA AND SOUTH CAROLINA FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 



EACH YEAR WE EQUIP MANY PHYSICIANS OFFICES COMPLETE WITH 
FURNITURE, MEDICAL and SURGICAL EQUIPMENT, INSTRUMENTS, 
LABORATORY SUPPLIES, ORTHOPEDIC SUPPLIES, FRACTURE APPLI- 
ANCES, DIAGNOSTIC EQUIPMENT, STERILIZERS and AUTOCLAVES, and 
many other items. 

Let us furnish your office when you are ready 



WINCHESTER 

•'CAROLINAS' HOUSE OF SERVICE" 



Winchester Surgical Supply Company 

200 SOUTH TORRENCE ST. CHARLOTTE, N. C. 28201 

Phone No. 704-372-2240 



Winchester-Ritch Surgical Company 

421 WEST SMITH ST. GREENSBORO, N. C. 27401 

Phone No. 919-272-5656 



70 




Official Group Disability Income Plan 

for 

Members Of North Carolina Medical Society 

Since 1939 
RENEWAL GUARANTEED TO AGE 70 



We ore as close as your phone . . . Call us Collect — Phone 682-5497 — Durham 

$300.00 Weekly Income — ($1300.00 Monthly) Tax Free 



CHOICE OF TWO PLANS 



Plan L-7 



Weekly Benefits 

$300.00 
250.00 
200.00 
150.00 

Plan L-65 



Weekly Benefits 

$300.00 
250.00 
200.00 
150.00 



Maximum Accident Benefits 
Lifetime 



Maximum Sickness Benefits 

**7 Years or to age 65 



Under 30 
$148.50 

124.50 

100.50 

76.50 



Under 30 

$184.50 

154.50 

124.50 

94.50 



30 - 39 

$169.50 

142.00 

114.50 

87.00 



SEMI-ANNUAL RATES 

40 - 49 50 - 59 

$340.50 

284.50 
228.50 
172.50 



$244.50 
204.50 
164.50 
124.50 



60 - 69 

$421.50 
352.00 
282.50 
213.00 



Maximum Accident Benefits 
Lifetime 



Maximum Sickness Benefits 
To age 65 
SEMI-ANNUAL RATES 

30 - 39 40 - 49 50 - 59 60 - 69 

$211.50 $289.50 $388.50 $421.50 

177.00 242.00 324.50 352.00 

142.50 194.50 260.50 282.50 

108.00 147.00 196.50 213.00 



Accident benefits commence with the first day of disability. Sickness benefits commence with the eighth day of disability or the 
first day of hospital confinement, whichever occurs first. 

J. L. & J. Slade Crumpton, Inc. 

J. L. CRUMPTOTN J. SLADE CRUMPTON 

ADMINISTRATORS PROFESSIONAL GROUP INSURANCE PROGRAMS 

SUITE 401 HOME SAVINGS BUILDING POST OFFICE DRAWER 1767 

DURHAM. NORTH CAROLINA 27702 

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CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

Underwritten by 

THE CONTINENTAL INSLRANCE COMPANIES 

80 Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. 



71 



Glen Lennox 

GARDEN APARTMENTS 

AND 

SHOPPING CENTER 



LOCATED: 

15-501 BYPASS AND RALEIGH ROAD 
IN CHAPEL HILL 



GLEN LENNOX CORPORATION 

Box 107 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Rental Office 
Phone 967-7081 



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^ 



"An association of Northwestern Mutual agents offer- 
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NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE BLDG. 

P. 0. Box 71 Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Phone: 942-6966 

Greensboro Phone: 275-8773 



72 




YATES MOTOR CO., INC. 

419 WEST FRANKLIN STREET 
CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 27514 



LONG 
MEADOW 




MILK 



BankAmericard 



^. (?. ^^a.*.^-^^^ 



DOCTOR'S 
FRIEND 

The Complete Credit Card is your friend in more 
ways than one. As a personal all-purpose credit 
card, it lets you replace all the "specialized" cards 
you now carry in your wallet. It's welcome at more 
than 12,000 North Carolina businesses and in 
many cities across the country. You get just one 
monthly bill for all your purchases, and you can 
take up to 20 months to pay. You can even use your 
BankAmericard to "charge" cash — up to $500 — 
at any NCNB office. 

BankAmericard also works for you as a business 
tool. Every time a patient uses his BankAmericard; 
you eliminate an accounts receivable item. Just 
deposit your BankAmericard charge slips at 
any BankAmericard Bank, and receive immediate 
credit for the total amount of your patient charges, 
less a moderate discount. And all BankAmericard 
professional charges are without recourse to you 
— so that you have more available cash for the 
day-today operation of your practice. If you'd like 
more information about BankAmericard, for either 
personal or professional purposes, just call the 
BankAmericard Representative at any NCNB 
office. 



NCNB 

North Carolina National Bank 



Member Federal Re 



• Federal Deposit 



Burlington 


Chapel Hill 


Charlotte 


Durham Fayetleville 


Greensboro 


High Point 


Morganton 


North Wilkesboro 


Raleigh 


Research Triangle 


Statesville 


Tarboro Tryon 


Wilmington 


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Total Resources over $1,275 billion 
Capital Funds in excess of $68 million 



73 



At The Pines,., 




Charcoal Steaks 




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Free gift wrapping, wrapping for mail, delivery 
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And remember: Your Gifts Mean More 
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74 



Silverware Diamonds Watches 



Orange Blossom 



• Towle 

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Distinctive Styling 



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CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 




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Choice and Prime Western Steaks 

Hickory Smoked, Charcoal Broiled on our Open Hearth 



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PARTIES 



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75 



DON'T BE FOOLED! 



Be sure your Kodachrome 



film is processed by 



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Eastman Kodak Company Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



Wf WANT TO HELP YOU BUILD 



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Optimum results in printing depend on proper planning — ^just as they do in 
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without expensive haste or waste. 

Since printing is a highly developed art requiring finely honed skills and 
marvelously complex though versatile machinery, be sure to consult with your 
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Formerly Colonial Press of Chapel Hill and Christian Printing Company of Durham 



76 



mUi&y/sM^i 




PRESCRIPTIONS 




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77 



Do You Know The Answers To The Following Questions? 

1 . Why does the Student American Medical Association endorse the 
SAAAA program with Minnesota Mutual? 

2. Why do so many young physicians go into the SAMA program? 

3. Why do more doctors handle their life insurance program with 
Minnesota Mutual? 

4. How do I get my copy of Estate Planning for Physicians? 

YOUR STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION CONSULTANTS WILL BE 
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LOCAL PHONES: 
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LOCAL OFFICE: 



Security Savings & Loan Building 

1428 Watts Street 

Durham, North Carolina 27701 



IF YOU CAN FIND A BETTER BUY THAN THE SAMA LIFE PROGRAM- 
THEN BUY IT 1 1 



78 




Eastgate Shopping Center— Chapel Hill 

ALL THE FAMILY WILL APPRECIATE THAT 

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THE WORLD 



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Collier Cobb 

& Associates, Inc. 

Insurance and Surety Bonds / Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



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A Gracious Welcome to the Calm Comfort 

of the New Carolina Inn 




A Unique Inn for a Great University 

About the only thing that you tvill recognize about the new Carolina Inn is 
the same friendly atmosphere and courteous service that has existed since John Sprunt 
Hill presented the original Inn to the University in 1935. 

Over the past two years we have added additional rooms, built a new cafeteria 
and more banquet room space. We moved the lobby. Now we welcome you to use 
our facilities the next time you are in Chapel Hill. 

Be it a leisurely meal in the Hill Room or an extended stay, you will always 
be made to feel at home at The Carolina Inn. 



Carolina Inn 

Owned and Operaled by Ihr University of Norlh Carolina 
Carl Moser, Director 



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DIANIME, JOHN and DEBORAH KINSEY DAVIS 



(Space courtesy of HICKORY FARMS OF OHIO. Eastgate Shopping Center, Chapel Hill. 



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